Navigant Research Blog

Green Roofs Sprouting Up Globally

— September 18, 2014

Many cities have mandated increased energy efficiency in buildings and, in some cases, net zero energy use by buildings.  A variety of solutions is needed to meet these goals; some are cutting-edge digital technologies, while others have been around for thousands of years.  Green roofs, one of the oldest energy-saving technologies, are becoming increasingly popular and having an impact on sustainability efforts.

Modern green roofs employ advanced design and materials to provide residents with rooftop oases while saving energy.  There are two primary types of green roofs: extensive green roofs, which generally have 2 to 12 cm of planting medium and are designed to be virtually self-sustaining; and intensive green roofs, which are far more complex and act as rooftop parks and gardens.  Intensive green roofs have soil depths of more than 12 cm and can include shrubs, small trees, and conventional lawns.  Given the amount of materials and the additional weight required for intensive designs, they are not suitable for all roofs.  Companies such as Illinois-based TectaGreen have been installing various types of green roofs on buildings across the United States for many years.

Cool Under Cover

Green roofs have been used for centuries to provide insulation and protect roofing materials, and they provide many benefits to building owners, occupants, and the general public.  Rooftop vegetation offers several public benefits; it improves urban air quality, manages stormwater runoff, and helps moderate the urban heat-island effect.  But it’s the private benefits for building owners that are primarily driving the market for green roofs.

The most direct benefit is reducing the amount of energy required to heat and cool buildings.  Several studies have shown that installing a green roof reduces summer cooling needs and winter heat loss by as much as 26%.  Green roofing can also extend the lifespan of a roof by protecting the waterproofing membrane from ultraviolet radiation and physical damage.  Other benefits include noise reduction, the reduction of electromagnetic radiation, and compliance with building codes such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).

Small but Growing

While costs for green roofs have dropped in recent years, there is an ongoing debate over their cost-effectiveness and payback period.  Installed costs of green roof systems can vary dramatically; extensive roofs (shallower) generally cost from $10 to $23 per square foot to install.  Intensive roofs can cost anywhere from $25 to $220 per square foot and may require regular maintenance.  Some argue that at those prices, green roofs cannot pay back their installation costs.  But it can also be argued that the most important benefits are those which are not easily quantified.  What’s more, compared to other, more intrusive energy efficiency measures, green roofs are relatively inexpensive.

Despite the cost, green roofs continue to be installed around the world.  Navigant Research’s recent Zero Energy Buildings report discusses the efforts underway to lower building energy consumption; green roofs represent a small but growing part of that effort.  In addition to energy efficiency, green roofs are part of a growing movement to improve the sustainability of urban environments and reconnect residents with the natural environment that their cities have largely erased.  They are sure to grow in popularity over the coming years.

 

Hybrids Need a Refresh

— September 18, 2014

Worldwide sales of hybrids through August were off 9% over sales during the same period in 2013.  The drop contrasts starkly with the last 3 years, which have seen January-August sales rise 65% from 2011 to 2012 and 24% from 2012 to 2013.  While the market for hybrids is certainly not going away – 2014 sales will likely hit 400,000 by year-end – it is becoming significantly more competitive, and expansion outside of the midsize hatchback segments that hybrids crowd is just not happening.

Toyota’s introduction of the Prius family in 2012, alongside a market for plug-ins that was limited to few costly models, signaled a revival of the hybrid market.  Since then, though, plug-in makers have cut costs sharply, and the number of available models has grown considerably.  Only 1/20th the size of hybrid market in 2011, sales of plug-ins are now one-quarter of hybrid sales.  Meanwhile, the difference between hybrids and conventional gas- and diesel-powered vehicles in terms of fuel economy is shrinking.

Weight Loss

Driven by Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, automakers are introducing vehicles with stop-start systems that are already widely popular in Europe and have significant weight reductions through materials engineering and engine downsizing.  Tracked by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), the average new vehicle sold in the United States hit 25.8 mpg last month ‑ 5 mpg higher than the 2008 average.

All of this means that, for new hybrids to succeed, they must show significant fuel economy savings over conventional competitors ‑ and at a price point significantly lower than plug-in rivals (minus government subsidies).  Or they must be new: they have to fill a segment outside the densely populated small hatchback or offer cutting-edge technologies that can grab some of the spotlight that Tesla, Nissan, BMW, and Chevrolet eat up with each new plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) introduction.

Ford has announced it will introduce a new dedicated hybrid – another small hatchback — to compete with the Prius in late 2018, and industry sources believe that Hyundai may also soon join the fray.  But the wisdom of these introductions is questionable if current trends continue.  Breaking into the cross-over market, as plug-ins are poised to do next year with the Model X and Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, would do much to keep hybrids relevant.  Bringing a diesel hybrid over from Europe would also help capture car buyers’ imaginations.

 

Waste-to-Energy Needs New Regulations

— September 18, 2014

A recent study published by the Earth Engineering Center (EEC) of Columbia University estimates that if the total volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) produced in the United States were incinerated in waste-to-energy (WTE) power plants, 12% of the country’s total electricity demand could be met.  This is more than 5 points higher than the current share of U.S. energy demand met by renewable sources today (7%), with WTE representing just a small fraction of the total energy mix.

Just 86 WTE plants are in operation in the United States today.  No new plants have been built since 1995.  Meanwhile, Waste Management recently divested its Wheelabrator Technologies subsidiary, which operates 17 plants around the country.

With so much upside, why does this market continue to stagnate?

Waste Pyramid

The United States currently produces 250 million tons of trash annually across the country.  This represents 15% to 20% of the global total.  Despite an abundance of feedstock, three primary barriers limit market growth: lack of regulatory support, lack of public support, and low electricity rates.

Among these, lack of regulatory support is often cited as the primary barrier to realizing the market’s full potential.  Across the United States, for example, landfilling continues to be the de facto solution for disposing of MSW, with relatively few exceptions.  On average, about 11% of the MSW is diverted to WTE and around 35% is recycled or composted.  The remainder (54%) is landfilled.  This reflects a waste management regulatory regime in the United States that falls well short of more aggressive policies set forth by European policymakers.

European principles articulated under a waste management hierarchy pyramid framework provide strong support for WTE and energy recovery.  A combination of land constraints, higher electricity prices, and a perilous dependence on Russian natural gas have provided European policymakers the motivation needed to enact strong support for WTE and other energy conversion technologies.  Combined with higher tipping fees – the cost of disposing of waste – these policies help reduce dependence on landfills.

Plenty of Fuel

By contrast, waste management in the United States is not coordinated at the federal level.  Instead, policy implementation is left to state discretion.  Individual states – Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and New Hampshire among the leaders – have been far more aggressive in investing in infrastructure to boost recycling and energy recovery from MSW, but these policies have not yet found broad support across the rest of the country.

Recent market developments in the United States, however, signal a likely pendulum shift in favor of WTE and other waste conversion technologies.

In anticipation of tightening restrictions around coal-based generation from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), utilities and state policymakers are actively seeking alternative sources of energy that provide the coveted baseload capabilities of centralized fossil plants.  Among baseload renewables, WTE is among the few options logistically feasible across the country, with MSW generated in abundance and continuously in areas of high population density.

Meanwhile, according to findings in Navigant Research’s Smart Waste report, the traditional waste management market is facing a disruption similar to that faced by electric utilities at the hands of distributed generation.  Although these solutions seek to turn a liability (trash) into a strategic resource, WTE and other energy conversion technologies will benefit from greater emphasis placed on the value of waste as an input for renewable energy generation.

We expect energy recovery solutions to generate 70% of the revenue attributable to next-generation waste management technologies in North America.  While this represents a healthy growth opportunity, it’s just the tip of the iceberg, as the EEC study demonstrates.

 

Toyota Commits to Active Safety Features

— September 18, 2014

If the world’s largest automaker gets its way, by the end of this decade, we can expect advanced active safety and semi-automated driving features to become as familiar as anti-lock brakes and stability control have in the past 10 years.

During an advanced safety systems seminar near Toyota’s North American technical center in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the automaker challenged its competitors when it committed to offering advanced active safety systems across its lineup by 2017.  Toyota also increased its commitment to advanced safety R&D by extending the initial 5-year mandate of the Collaborative Safety Research Center (CSRC) from 2016 through 2021 and adding $35 million in new funding.

At the same event, Simon Nagata, senior vice president of the Toyota Technical Center, announced an expansion of the scope of the CSRC, which was launched by company president Akio Toyoda in 2011.  Nagata described the program as unique in the industry because “all findings are openly shared in order to benefit people everywhere.”

CSRC research initially focused on three areas, driver distraction, active safety, and helping to protect the most vulnerable traffic populations, including children, teens, and seniors. Automated and connected vehicle technologies are now part of the CSRC scope of work. To date, CSRC has initiated or completed 34 projects with 17 universities and research hospitals.

Join the Crowd

Ford has drawn attention in recent years for offering a full suite of driver assist capabilities, including active park assist, blind spot information, lane departure warning and prevention, and adaptive cruise control on the high-volume Fusion midsize sedan.  Some of these features are even available on the smaller Focus and Escape.  Other manufacturers, including Nissan, Honda, and even Hyundai, have since added some of these features to mainstream products.  Toyota, on the other hand, has largely restricted these technologies to its premium Lexus brand.

“Many of these capabilities will be added to Toyota brand vehicles starting in 2015 and with the goal of becoming the first full-line manufacturer to offer these technologies across the entire lineup by 2017,” said Bill Fay, Toyota group vice president and general manager.  Fay didn’t provide details about exactly which vehicles will get what features.  However, the updated 2015 Camry sedan, announced in April at the New York Auto Show, will offer radar-based adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, cross traffic alert, lane departure alert, and a pre-collision system.

Toyota’s increased emphasis on active safety and automated driving is likely to inspire both the competition and regulators who may well see this as an opportunity to begin mandating the technologies that are building blocks for autonomous vehicles, just as they did previously with stability control and rear cameras.  And it will provoke a wider discussion of how we incorporate automated vehicles into the transportation ecosystem.

 

 

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