Navigant Research Blog

Floating Offshore Wind Showing Potential

— November 1, 2017

Offshore wind is notching up impressive cost reduction success, evidenced by record low power purchase agreement prices in recent UK and other European competitive bidding auctions. This is great news, but the game changer is if floating offshore wind foundations could achieve commercial success.

This could reduce offshore wind foundation costs and open cost-effective wind power in locations coincident with large coastal population centers, energy demand, and deep ocean sea beds that currently aren’t cost-effective with today’s variety of fixed bottom foundations. Potential markets are the entire west coast of the Americas, Hawaii, Japan, South Korea, parts of China, South Africa, New Zealand, and many European markets, including much of the Mediterranean.

Floating Offshore Wind Becoming a Reality

With that context in mind, it’s great news to see that floating offshore wind is moving from the conceptual and design phase to actual projects. In 4Q 2017, Norway’s Statoil installed a 30 MW wind farm on the northeast coast of Scotland. It is made up of five 6 MW Siemens turbines installed on floating structures at Buchan Deep, 25 km off Peterhead, Scotland.

The Hywind Scotland wind farm is expected to power around 20,000 households. Statoil believes the project will demonstrate the feasibility of future commercial floating wind farms “that could be more than four times the size.” From the first pilot floating turbine outside Karmøy, Norway in 2009 to the launch of this new wind farm, capital costs have fallen by around 60%-70%. Statoil says cost reductions of a further 40%-50% are realistic for future projects.

Hywind Scotland Wind Farm

(Source: Statoil)

Hywind Scotland

The Hywind project will cover around 4 square kilometers at a sea depth of 95-120 meters. The floating turbines have a total height of 253 meters, with 175 meters of the structures floating above the surface of the sea (to the wingtip) and 78 meters submerged underwater. The rotor diameter is 154 meters. This is only the first step of the project, with the end goal being to develop a large-scale floating offshore wind project of 500 MW-1,000 MW. Statoil is a serious company with serious money backing its efforts, including the company agreeing in a competitive auction round in December 2016 to pay $42.4 million for lease rights to develop an offshore wind project off the New York coast.

Following France’s Example

The Hywind launch comes on the back of the inauguration of France’s first floating offshore wind turbine—Floatgen—in October and represents an important breakthrough for floating offshore wind. It shows it is ready to be integrated into the energy market. Floatgen’s 2 MW turbine features a number of innovative solutions, from the concrete composition and its construction to the nylon mooring lines.

The consortium developer Ideol has optimized some areas of the design and the construction method. It is building its supply chain in preparation for mass production, all with an eye to driving costs down. Ideol says its solution is ideal because it is compact and does not need to increase in size and mass at the same ratio as the turbine nameplate rating. Ideol says it can potentially be adapted to turbines up to 15 MW, the size range the leading turbine OEMs are planning for next-generation 2025-2030 offshore installations.

Offshore Wind Soon to Be a Legitimate Power Option

Floating offshore wind is not yet commercially viable against fixed bottom foundations. Plenty of fixed bottom locations are available, but these two projects show that commercial viability just around the corner. If the past decade has been any guide, with the costs of onshore wind falling 77% in the past 7 years, the wind market has been attacking challenges, costs, and other impediments and disproving doubters. Floating offshore wind is increasingly likely to prove its legitimacy as a cost-effective offshore wind option.

 

The Peer-to-Peer Future of EV Charging

— November 1, 2017

In cities where EV drivers believe they have limited access to publicly available charging infrastructure, the resulting range anxiety hinders plug-in EV (PEV) adoption rates. VW’s subsidiary, Electrify America, required investment in infrastructure because of the dieselgate settlement, which should help reduce range anxiety in many areas. A variety of new technologies are bringing new value to the existing EV charging infrastructure, a trend that could also help ease range anxiety and grow the EV market.

Communication Standards

Many standards from organizations such as the Society of Automotive Engineers have been established for communications between EVs and EV supply equipment (EVSE). Of note is International Standards Organization (ISO) 15118, which specifies a common understanding of all processes between an EV and EVSE. Specifically, ISO 15118 standardizes the communications between the EV communication controller and the supply equipment communication controller. The communication standards enable everything from bidirectional charging to transaction services. Vehicles that comply with ISO 15118 will allow for automatic owner account authentication at charging points that both prevents data manipulation and initiates seamless smart charging of EVs. The establishment of this standard enables bidirectional charging, which can provide utilities with grid services and creates the groundwork for the buying and selling of electricity between the grid, EVSE, and EVs.

RFID Technology

South Korea has been aggressively trying to support and expand its EV fleet. In 2015, the City of Seoul partnered with company Power Cube to give out special electric charger cables to enable drivers to recharge their vehicles at 100,000 locations with standard outlets. These cables are equipped with RFID readers that scan an RFID tag attached to the power outlet to be used. Power Cube then processes the transaction by transmitting the driver’s identity, time, place, and electricity purchased via a 3G wireless module included in the charging cable to Power Cube. Power Cube bills the user later, and then pays the electricity provider.

Seoul hoped that the giveaway would incentivize more private EV ownership; as of the program launch, the majority of EVs in Seoul were owned by public sector entities. It intended to give out all 100,000 cables by 2018. Each cable costs 1 million won (about $917) and has a charge capacity at 3.3 kW. While there has been no coverage of the program since its inception, there continues to be a market opportunity for transaction authentication in the EV charging space, with the City of Busan’s launch of a similar program in 2016.

Blockchain Technology

Blockchain could offer a low cost and reliable way for transactions to be recorded and validated across a distributed network with no central point of authority. It also removes some of the technological barriers associated with dynamic and wireless charging; these services can use blockchain technology to record and validate the purchase of electricity from these chargers automatically, without driver intervention.

In Germany, blockchain technology can be used to authenticate and manage the billing process for EV charging stations. For example, Car eWallet will enable a driver’s car to pay for charging, with no need for pulling out a credit card.

Share&Charge, another e-mobility service, has completed its pilot in Germany and is partnering with eMotorWerks to bring its services to California. Participation in the pilot will be based on a first come, first serve basis. Share&Charge uses the Ethereum blockchain because of its support for smart contracts. It creates a token on this chain and users provide/receive payment in these tokens that then can be redeemed for traditional currencies.

Although the use of these services for widespread dynamic charging services is still a ways down the road, these EV-focused transactional services could expand publicly available charging infrastructure by enabling point-to-point sharing of private EV charging stations. They could also enable future applications such as toll payments and carsharing services.

Navigant Research’s upcoming report, Wireless EV Charging, focuses on how wireless charging technology has become increasingly more efficient over the past couple years. A growing number of pilot programs and applications are popping up around the world. As these actors move forward with expanding charging infrastructure, developing technologies may help process and authenticate future transactions.

 

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