Navigant Research Blog

Utilities Explore Different Approaches to Residential Energy Storage

— August 31, 2015

Residential energy storage systems are anticipated to see exponential growth over the coming decade. The capacity of annual installations worldwide is expected to grow from 562 MWh in 2015 to 38,525 MWh in 2024, according to Navigant Research’s report, Community, Residential, and Commercial Energy Storage. While numerous storage system developers are lining up to begin selling residential batteries, utilities around the world are struggling to determine how to integrate these new distributed energy resources into their networks.

Utilities can receive numerous benefits from residential storage, including deferring investments in distribution grid upgrades and stabilizing circuits with high penetrations of solar PV. Additionally, the use of residential storage in an aggregated virtual power plant configuration helps utilities manage their financial risk by calling on distributed batteries to supply loads at times of peak demand, thus avoiding purchasing costly wholesale energy. Despite these benefits, many utilities are unsure how residential storage can be integrated into their networks. While much uncertainty remains, two major utilities have recently announced pilot projects employing very different business models.

Different Approaches

In August, Australian utility Ergon Energy announced a program with leading vendors SunPower and Sunverge to deploy residential storage systems tied to solar PV (initially in 33 Queensland homes). Through this program, Ergon will own the battery systems located behind the meter in customer homes. The utility claims these 5 kW/12 kWh lithium ion systems paired with a 4.9 kW PV array will supply around 75% of a home’s electricity needs. Participating customers will pay an $89 monthly fee, and Ergon claims they will save at least $200 per year by purchasing much less grid-supplied electricity. This utility-owned approach to residential storage represents one path, while a very different model is being tested across the Pacific.

California utility San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) recently launched a pilot program to encourage homeowners to install residential storage themselves. In contrast to Ergon’s program, SDG&E would like its customers, or third-party vendors, to own the distributed systems. The utility will offer a tiered system of cash incentives and reduced rates that could, when combined with the state’s other incentives, render the storage free to customers. SDG&E envisions a rate that reflects forecasted system and circuit conditions on a day-ahead basis, and through hourly price signals, will incent both charging and discharging activity. Grid operators will then rely on energy stored in these batteries during peak demand, reducing the need to upgrade their equipment, and avoid utilizing more costly conventional generation sources. This approach can greatly improve the overall efficiency of the grid and help address the duck curve issues that arise from the ramping down of distributed solar PV systems during peak demand. A key feature of this model is that outside of peak demand periods, customers can utilize the battery however they want to maximize their consumption of solar energy, reduce demand charges, and ensure they have power during grid outages.

Potential Paths

The economics of both pilot programs will be determined over the next several years and will likely influence other utilities around the world. SDG&E has also proposed a separate pilot project that will deploy utility-owned batteries under its direct control, and it will compare that project’s performance against the tariff-based systems in terms of cost and effectiveness. Key questions for both utilities revolve around opening the residential storage market to additional participants and ensuring optimal benefits for both customers and grid operators. Despite the uncertainty, these pilot programs demonstrate potential paths forward for what is expected to be a massive global industry.

 

Smart Buildings Provide New Opportunities for Energy Storage

— July 15, 2015

As the energy storage industry continues to rapidly develop, systems in large commercial buildings are becoming one of the most attractive applications. Energy storage systems in these settings can offer reduced utility bills by continuously monitoring facility usage and taking action when demand is about to cross a specified limit, thus avoiding costly charges.  This business model has been successful in California, where high demand charges combined with incentives through the state’s Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) make for an attractive return on investment.  As battery prices continue to fall, this model is likely to be replicated in other regions.  As explored in Navigant Research’s report, Community, Residential, and Commercial Energy Storage, global deployments of storage in commercial buildings are forecast to increase from 75.2 MW in 2015 to 1,773 MW by 2020, at a compound annual growth rate of 88%.

Emerging Opportunities

There is a natural synergy in energy service companies already providing building automation and energy management/efficiency solutions partnering with storage system providers or offering these solutions themselves.  These companies already have a deep understanding of building operations and energy usage, typically using energy management software, which can be upgraded relatively easily to include an onsite storage system to shave demand peaks.  Similar partnerships already exist between building management and solar energy companies that work together to reduce a facility’s energy costs.  Additionally, the increasing popularity of workplace electric vehicle charging is expected to result in a greater demand for storage systems, as they can help reduce the cost of providing day-time charging to employees and visitors.

New Partnerships and Offerings

The benefit of these types of partnerships has been demonstrated by recent announcements from leading storage and building energy management providers.  Notably, Tesla Motors, which recently announced a line of commercial energy storage systems, has partnered with demand response and energy management software provider EnerNOC.  EnerNOC’s energy intelligence software (EIS) will serve as the connection between batteries and a customer’s facility, enabling more effective demand charge management and demand response programs.  Tesla has also recently announced a partnership with Black & Veatch to provide a similar offering for larger commercial, industrial, and municipal facilities.  Black & Veatch has existing experience in this area, having already designed more than 24 MW of behind-the-meter energy storage capacity for commercial and industrial facilities.

Tesla is far from the only battery manufacturer targeting this emerging space.  Leading lithium ion provider LG Chem recently inked a similar partnership with energy management firm ONEnergy to offer lithium ion-based storage systems to commercial, industrial, and residential customers in northeast North America.  However, one of the most interesting players in this space is likely to be Johnson Controls.  The building and automotive systems giant already manufactures a line of battery products, and it is expected to soon be launching a lithium ion offering primarily targeting its existing building automation and energy management clients.  These existing relationships and the company’s expertise with building systems may give it a significant competitive advantage.  The coming years will likely see more partnerships of this nature as increasing attention is paid to this rapidly growing market.

 

Tesla Announcement Highlights Importance of Energy Storage Partnerships

— June 9, 2015

Boatbuilder_webTesla Motor’s April announcement of stationary energy storage solutions brought an unprecedented level of attention to the burgeoning energy storage industry, benefiting all stakeholders.  Competing products providing storage for residential, commercial, and industrial customers are already on the market, however.

These systems are designed for a variety of distributed energy storage applications—currently some of the fastest-growing areas of the global storage market.  Navigant Research estimates that the global installed capacity of residential and commercial energy storage systems will grow from around 246 MW in 2015 to over 10,484 MW by 2024, with lithium ion (Li-ion) expected to account for 58% of total capacity.

The new product launches from Tesla highlight the growing importance of partnerships within the industry.  While Tesla provides a sleek battery module, the company does not offer bidirectional inverters or installation services.  The energy storage ecosystem is comprised primarily of companies like Tesla, with specialized offerings that must seek out partners to offer the complete solutions that customers demand.  (Navigant Research’s recent report Energy Storage Enabling Technologies analyzes the value chain within this industry.)

Tesla has established partnerships to complete their offering and provide storage systems for a range of end users through channel partners.  The systems will be available through solar PV provider SolarCity, demand response aggregator EnerNOC, and engineering/construction specialist Black & Veatch, among others.  These partnerships each target different market segments, each requiring varying business models and product specifications.  With Tesla’s plans, competition has intensified in the distributed storage market, as several leading companies have recently announced new partnerships to offer similar integrated solutions.

Competition Heating Up

Partnerships are essential for most storage market players: battery manufacturers need supply agreements for their products and system integrators need component suppliers, while software and power electronics providers look for integrators and developers to get their products into complete solutions.

Electrical solutions provider Gexpro recently announced an agreement with battery manufacturer LG Chem, the power conversion provider for Ideal Power, and energy management software vendor Geli to offer a fully integrated battery energy storage systems (BESS) for commercial and industrial (C&I) customers.  This follows similar announcements from LG Chem to provide Li-ion batteries in the Northeast United States through an agreement with energy services company OneEnergy for C&I customers and Eguana for residential customers.

Other notable relationships recently announced include solar PV provider SunPower partnering with storage system vendors Stem and Sunverge to offer BESSs for their C&I solar customers.  Additionally, leading Li-ion battery vendor Samsung SDI recently announced supply agreements with GreenCharge Networks, as well as with microgrid developer ABB.

Aside from battery vendors, other companies in the market are establishing similar relationships to solidify their offerings.  Notably, microinverter manufacturer Enphase, which is developing energy storage solutions utilizing its products, recently announced an agreement with battery vendor ELIIY.

Coming into Focus

While supply agreements and distribution partnerships have been developing in the stationary storage market for some time, more recent announcements targeting C&I customers are increasingly important.  In this segment, it is crucial for companies to offer integrated solutions that are easy to operate and quick to install.  As a result, leading companies are joining forces to combine their specialties into the most effective offering.  We explore these relationships within the energy storage ecosystem through various reports, including the recently published Navigant Research Leaderboard Report: Energy Storage System Integrators and an upcoming Leaderboard Report on Li-ion grid storage.

 

Offshore Wind Farm a Milestone for New England Energy

— May 18, 2015

At an industrial facility in Rhode Island, work has finally begun on what will likely be America’s first offshore wind farm. Originally proposed in 2008, Providence-based company Deepwater Wind’s project has overcome significant headwinds to receive permits, sign power purchase agreements, and finally begin construction. Made up of only five turbines, work on the relatively small project comes at a time when New England’s energy future faces uncertainty. The region generates almost no energy locally, being dependent primarily on natural gas and coal imports from other parts of the country. As a result, consumers are susceptible to volatile rates due to severe weather and supply constraints. A proposal to expand natural gas pipelines represents one way forward for the region, while the wind farm on Block Island represents a very different path.

As a former resident of Block Island, I have been intently following the progress of this project since its initial announcement. While working on the ferry to the mainland, I spent many hours on a nearly empty ship hauling truckloads of diesel fuel to be burned at the island’s one power plant. It comes as no surprise that island residents have to pay some of the highest electricity rates in the country, around $0.50 per kWh. These rates are significantly higher than even Hawaii, where expensive electricity has set off a rush of solar PV and other local energy generation.

Looking Ahead

The wind farm is a crucial component of Block Island’s energy future. Deepwater Wind claims that once operational, the farm could reduce island electricity rates by nearly 40%. Many island communities around the world have recently initiated ambitious plans to wean themselves off imported fuels completely by integrating locally generated energy. Local energy storage has been an important aspect of many islands’ plans to reduce dependence on imported energy, as discussed in a recent post by my colleague Anissa Dehamna. A great example of this can be found on Kodiak Island in Alaska. Global power electronics provider ABB worked with the local electric cooperative to install both battery and flywheel-based energy storage systems to help stabilize the output from the island’s wind turbines, and to store excess power generated at night to be used at times of high demand. The addition of energy storage on Kodiak Island has enabled up to 100% penetration for renewable energy and greatly reduced diesel consumption.

The development of the wind farm on Block Island will present great opportunities to demonstrate the value that other clean energy technologies can provide. The island is an interesting case due to the dramatically smaller population outside of the summer months. There are only around 1,000 year-round residents on the island, meaning demand for electricity most of the year is only a fraction of summer demand. For most of the year, the 30 MW output from the wind farm will be far more than is needed to power the island. By integrating local energy storage, the island could easily be a net exporter of energy through the soon-to-be-built transmission line connecting the mainland while only ever using locally produced clean energy. This can provide substantial benefits to residents through lower electricity rates and a much cleaner, more reliable power system.

 

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