Navigant Research Blog

In South Korea, an Energy Storage Bonanza

— October 14, 2014

South Korea has gone from having little to no energy storage to procuring about 50 MW in the span of a few months.  This procurement makes the early projects in deregulated markets in the United States, such as PJM Interconnection, seem small in comparison.

Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) is procuring 52 MW of advanced batteries for frequency regulation in 2014 through two installations totaling 28 MW and 24 MW.  Proposals will be evaluated in the coming weeks, and four consortia, including major South Korean lithium ion (Li-ion) vendors and systems integrators, are bidding in the procurement.  Located at the West Anseong Substation and the New Yongin Substation, these installations will handle power supply to Seoul and the surrounding area.  KEPCO estimates the cost for these two projects will be ₩60 billion ($58.3 million).  The total market size for frequency regulation in South Korea is estimated by to be 1.1 GW, and in order to meet this requirement, KEPCO typically requires thermal generators hold back 5% of capacity, for which it pays them ₩600 billion ($583 million) per year.

Less Regulation = Lower Costs

Instead of using thermal generators for all its frequency regulation requirements, KEPCO estimates it can procure 500 MW of energy storage for frequency regulation for ₩625 billion ($607.8 million) between now and 2017.  By investing in these resources, KEPCO would be able to avoid a portion of the yearly payments to thermal generators.

Lessons from existing projects and market reforms in Chile and the United States suggest that these changes will have major effects on the South Korean grid.  First, wholesale energy prices should decrease once thermal generators are not obligated to hold back 5% capacity for frequency regulation.  Although KEPCO is not planning to displace its entire frequency regulation requirement with Li-ion batteries, releasing half the power plants from this obligation (or halving the obligation to 2.5%) would make a difference in energy prices.

Ratepayer Returns

Second, the overall amount of frequency regulation that KEPCO must procure should decrease with the addition of fast, accurate resources such as Li-ion batteries.  Fast and accurate resources correct the deviation in frequency more quickly, meaning that less frequency regulation is required overall.  Therefore, 5% (52 MW) of fast-response resources could deliver more than 5% of the regulation required on the South Korean grid.

Ultimately, the South Korean ratepayer will benefit because these savings should be passed on to the customer.  Keeping energy prices low is an economic and political issue in South Korea, where many key industries rely on energy-intensive exports.  Manufacturers are keen to keep their products priced competitively, and the government is under pressure to keep improving economic growth.

 

A Comeback for Community Storage

— August 20, 2014

Two years ago, community energy storage (CES) was heralded as the most promising distributed storage market.  The market subsequently stalled when demonstrations failed to take off.  Originally, most utilities in the United States pared back on ambitious pilots due to high transaction cost.  Although the business-to-business model of community-level systems was appealing, North American utilities struggled to secure permission from homeowners to install systems and transaction costs skyrocketed.  System development for distribution transformers in North America was also costly, and this, combined with the high cost of customer engagement, killed all large-scale projects.

Now this model could be staging a comeback.  Toronto Hydro, along with eCAMION Inc., the University of Toronto, and Dow Kokam LLC, recently installed a CES system at the Roding Arena and Community Centre in Toronto, Canada.  The pilot project will allow Toronto Hydro to monitor the technology and will help validate its benefits to Toronto’s electrical grid.  This system uses 250 kWh/500 kW Dow Kokam lithium polymer nickel manganese cobalt cells, along with thermal management and controls from eCAMION.  The University of Toronto is managing the control, protection, and power management.

Small Is Beautiful

Situating storage near the customer provides several benefits.  First, it allows a utility to correct power quality where it matters most – near the customer.  Community storage can also help utilities maintain service during grid outages, at least for a few hours.  Finally, CES gives the utility information about what is happening at the edge of the grid, which is an important management tool.

More interest is developing in Europe, where distribution system operators are experiencing difficulty with behind-the-meter solar PV and instability from intermittent renewables upstream.  The United Kingdom is especially bullish, with several departments funding community storage.

Sharp Laboratories of Europe was awarded a grant of £396,541 ($661,858) from the United Kingdom’s Department of Energy & Climate Change to develop and scale up a new battery technology for residential energy storage and CES systems.  Electrovaya began delivering systems to Scottish and Southern Energy Power Distribution (SSEPD) in the second quarter of 2014 as part of an order for 25 distributed and independent energy storage systems.  The systems range in energy capacity from 12.5 kWh to over 80 kWh.  SSEPD has a separate community storage demonstration with S&C Electric that consists of three 25 kWh lithium ion units on the low-voltage network.

Europe is emerging as a leader in community storage by launching small pilots to test and prove the concept, instead of ambitious 80-unit projects.

 

Power-to-Gas Comes to North America

— August 14, 2014

Ontario has emerged as hub of clean energy innovation.  The province has rapidly changed its energy mix from coal to renewables in the past 10 years, and Ontario’s latest Long-Term Energy Plan, finalized in 2013, calls for 50 MW of energy storage to be procured in 2014.  Ontario is also home to several innovative storage companies, including Electrovaya, Temporal Power, Hydrostor, and Hydrogenics.

In addition to the 50 MW storage plan – split between 35 MW announced earlier this year and 15 MW slated for the second half of 2014 – Ontario also has a number of storage demonstrations underway.  A 250 kWh/500 kW lithium ion community storage system is being tested by Toronto Hydro, and Temporal Power has two projects: one for wind integration with Hydro One and one for frequency regulation developed by NRStor.  Hydrostor is testing a 4 MWh/1 MW demonstration facility to showcase the firm’s underwater compressed air system, 80 meters underwater.

First the Old World

In addition to batteries, compressed air energy storage, and flywheels, Ontario is adding hydrogen energy storage.  Hydrogenics has announced a 2 MW power-to-gas project in Ontario as a part of the 35 MW procurement.  Power-to-gas systems use surplus electricity and an electrolyzer to generate hydrogen for direct injection into the natural gas grid, or to generate hydrogen and then syngas for direct injection into the natural gas grid.  Ancillary benefits include using the electrolyzer for demand response (including frequency regulation).

In Navigant Research’s recent white paper, The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Industries: 10 Trends to Watch, one of the trends examined is power-to-gas.  Specifically, the white paper suggests that the power-to-gas concept will be proven in Europe.  In the near term, Navigant Research estimates a $100 million market for power-to-gas in Europe in 2015.  The European power-to-gas market is expected to grow to as much as 665 MW in 2018, representing $850 million in revenue, according to Navigant Research estimates.  This base scenario equates to 4% of the wind capacity to be installed in Europe that same year, with a total installed capacity by 2018 equivalent to 1.9% of the installed capacity of wind from 2014 to 2018.

Although North America has a smaller grid system and the advantage of cheap natural gas – which makes it difficult to make a business case for any alternative technology to gas turbines – there is clearly room for power-to-gas.  Hydrogenics intends to find out how much.

 

In New York, Greening Older Buildings

— July 21, 2014

Building energy efficiency has reached the mainstream.  Clean energy technologies have become so common that technical training in renewable energy and energy efficiency retrofits is becoming more and more accessible.

Green City Force (GCF), a Brooklyn, New York-based non-profit, has trained nearly 300 young adults living under the poverty line in New York City for careers in the green economy with the group’s Clean Energy Corps.

Clean Energy Corps supports a variety of projects related to energy and efficiency, including energy audits in low-income homes, urban agriculture, and energy efficiency retrofits.  The corps provides its members with an academic and technical training program to prepare them for college; the program leads to certification for entry-level work in energy efficiency and includes GPro, a nationally recognized certification in building science.

Retrofitting

One of the major partners for GCF, and for Clean Energy Corps specifically, is the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA).  More than 8.4 million people reside in New York City, and 615,199 of them are served by the authority’s Public Housing and Section 8 programs.  This represents 7.4% of the population of New York City.  Together, both programs cover 12.4% of the rental apartment stock in one of the most expensive cities in the world.

NYCHA’s property portfolio is equally impressive and rivals commercial housing developers.  It oversees 334 developments, including 2,563 buildings and nearly 178,000 apartments.  In contrast, the Chicago Housing Authority has 21,000 apartments in 128 properties.  Los Angeles has 2,491 apartments across a portfolio of 93 properties.   Only 20% of the developments in NYCHA’s portfolio are less than 30 years old, and one-third of the authority’s developments are more than 50 years old.  Modern buildings are built with energy efficiency in mind, but older buildings have more room for improvement.

The More the Better

GCF develops service projects in partnership with NYCHA, city agencies, and other non-profits.  One example is the Love Where You Live Challenge, which bring corps members together with fellow NYCHA residents to reduce energy use in homes.  Corps members gain experience and skills, while the authority reduces its energy costs.  NYCHA spends $535 million annually on utilities.

NYCHA is not the only public agency using innovative approaches to promote energy efficiency.  The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) recently awarded Philips Lighting a 10-year lighting performance contract to upgrade lighting across 25 parking garages to LED lighting.  Instead of paying out of pocket for the 13,000 fixtures, WMATA will share the savings in energy costs with Phillips over the 10-year period.

For disruptive technologies such as energy efficiency, the more business models in the market, the more accessible the clean energy economy becomes.

 

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