Navigant Research Blog

Sunny Outlook for Multifamily Housing Energy Advances

— February 10, 2015

In January, the Obama administration announced a new partnership with the state of California to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy in the multifamily housing market. As part of this new agenda, President Obama established a target of 100 MW of renewable energy across federally subsidized housing by 2020. The program aims to deliver both climate change and economic benefits, estimating that improving energy efficiency in the country’s subsidized multifamily homes by 20% would deliver a $7 billion annual savings and a reduction of 350 million tons of carbon in 10 years.

Accelerating PACE

Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing will have a big role to play in achieving the goals of the White House and the state of California. PACE programs enable customers to finance up to 100% of an energy efficiency or renewable project and repay the debt as a property tax assessment over a period of up to 20 years. These programs are locally defined by city or state legislation.

The off-balance sheet financing model hit a major roadblock in 2010 when the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) put residential PACE programs on hold over a battle initiated by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae over the first lien status of the energy efficiency debts of a PACE-funded project. The FHFA argued the PACE debts put a heightened risk of default on home mortgages and that Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae should not back mortgages on properties with PACE debt.

Four years later, FHFA has not formally changed its stance, but PACE programs are once again funding residential projects. The government of California was so certain the program did not add default risk that the state legislature passed SB 96 in 2013. SB 96 established the PACE Loss Reserve Program and ultimately rejuvenated programs throughout the state. California is not alone in the local drive for PACE financing. In fact, according to PACENow, the non-profit advocate for PACE financing, there are over 25,000 PACE projects underway across the United States, and 18% are supporting improvements in the multifamily housing segment.

 

(Source: PACENow)

Going West

The opportunity for energy management in the multifamily market is opening the door to growing business in the private sector, as well. For example, Bright Power, a company specializing in comprehensive energy management solutions for multifamily housing, including energy audits and benchmarking, energy efficiency upgrades, and solar, announced a $5 million round of financing that will help support the company’s entry into the California market. The overall buildings market is ripe for the adoption of renewable energy and investment in energy efficiency, and innovative financing models are helping customers overcome the upfront capital challenge. An upcoming Navigant Research report will examine the evolving market for energy efficiency financing as a part of Navigant Research’s Building Innovations syndicated research service.

 

Building Innovations Form Pivotal Spokes in the Circular Economy

— February 2, 2015

The annual World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, has come and gone again, and the usual irony of 1,700 private jets delivering the global elite to discuss climate change and inequality was perfectly ridiculed by Jon Stewart last week. But, beyond the spectacle of outsized wealth, there are some valuable economic and policy projects that hold promise outside the weeklong schmooze-fest.

In particular, the Circular Economy, an ongoing project at the forum, aims to tackle the current paradigm of consumption in light of a future of constrained resources and exponential growth in demand.  The Ellen McArthur Foundation, which supports an ongoing dialog on the circular economy explains the concept as thus:  “A circular economy seeks to rebuild capital, whether this is financial, manufactured, human, social or natural. This ensures enhanced flows of goods and services.”  An important question is how the theory of the circular economy can become tangible, which was a hot topic for this year’s discussions in Davos.

Rethink, Remodel

In the run-up to this year’s event, a Forbes article explained that the circular economy “requires businesses to rethink more than just their resource footprints and energy efficiency. It demands a more radical remodelling of business models.”  Reflecting on the big ideas of the circular economy, it seems the intelligent building, smart city, and innovations in energy management could be an ideal proving ground for these concepts in action.

The intelligent building is characterized by automated and responsive systems that maximize efficiency in consumption and productivity.  Intelligent buildings offer a new sort of resource that extends beyond the walls of any single facility to support key goals of grid modernization and the development of smart cities.  The technology exists to enable this kind of facility optimization, and investment in intelligent buildings and smart cities can demonstrate the benefits of a circular economy.  The following examples highlight how companies are bringing solutions to the intelligent building and smart city marketplace that align with the opportunity of the circular economy.

  • Philips has committed to the circular economy and the company’s lighting as a service offering aims to engage cost-constrained customers and manage the end-of-life treatment of lighting and system components.
  • Schneider Electric and Autodesk have announced a new partnership to bring innovation to building lifecycle management and “drive a deep and long-term transformation in the construction industry, providing greater value to each user and contributing to solve the energy challenge.”
  • Cisco’s position is presented as an “engineering strategy around the Internet of Everything [supporting] the transition to a circular economy, with new connected devices enabling the tracking of products, components and materials for re-use and recovery; new business models through greater connection with customers; and more effective reverse logistics chains.”

While the circular economy might seem like a lofty ideal that will demand major shifts in our consumption mindset, advances like these demonstrate steps in the right direction.

 

What It Will Take To Transform Buildings in Large Cities

— January 22, 2015

From New York to Los Angeles, a growing number of the largest U.S. cities are recognizing that tackling building efficiency translates into progress toward climate resilience.  The underlying assumption is that better information leads to action.  As these cities compile baselines on commercial building energy use and educate the public on the cost-effective opportunities for energy reductions, the next question that arises is whether building owners will take action.

New York State of Mind

New York City was the first to launch a comprehensive strategy to tackle energy waste in commercial buildings through four local laws under the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan.  The complementary laws not only mandate energy benchmarking, but also require performance upgrades to meet local energy codes for citywide renovations, major retrofits in buildings over 50,000 SF to meet lighting efficiency standards, and the installation of submeters by 2025.  Mayor Bill de Blasio has continued the commitment to improving the city’s climate readiness and, in September, announced a new goal for a citywide 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.   According to a recent article in The New York Times, the mayor’s office estimates that the energy efficiency advances in buildings deliver tremendous economic benefits.  According to the director of the Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency, the city spends $800 million a year to run its facilities, and energy efficiency retrofits could generate $180 million in annual savings by 2025.

Best Practices

The City Energy Project (CEP), a national initiative directed by the Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), aims to help 10 cities design energy efficiency plans and share best practices for promoting change in their largest commercial buildings.   Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Kansas City (Missouri), Los Angeles, Orlando, Philadelphia, and Salt Lake City have each joined the project, according to the CEP fact sheet. As outlined on the CEP website, in 3 to 5 years, the initiative will create transparency on building energy use and create financial vehicles for investment in energy efficiency.

New financing channels are a critical element in the mission to tackle commercial building energy efficiency.  While many of the most attainable energy efficiency improvements can be low-cost or no-cost improvements through scheduling and procedures, transformational changes require capital investment.  The challenge is how to engage building owners with financing mechanisms that enable those investments.

Opening the Purse

At the 2014 World Energy Engineering Conference, held in October in Washington, D.C., several sessions honed in on the challenge of financing energy efficiency.  The market recognizes the opportunity and benefits associated with energy efficiency, but the reality is that capital budgets are tight.  Former President Bill Clinton, the keynote speaker, declared, “Financing is holding back the energy revolution.”

In Navigant Research’s view, the challenge is two-fold.  On one hand, there is the opportunity to adjust perspectives on energy efficiency investment.  Advocacy efforts, such as the CEP, could help building owners broaden their views from a focus on payback to a longer-term view of how energy efficiency and intelligent building investments enhance the value of their facilities.  On the other hand, our research suggests that a change is underway in the performance contracting and shared savings models that have helped fuel investment in energy efficiency historically.   Watch for a new report on energy service companies and the transformation of intelligent buildings financing in 2015 as a part of our Building Innovations Service.

 

How Technology Partnerships Will Shape the Future of Building Innovation

— January 20, 2015

The last 5 years have been monumental for the smart buildings industry.  Major building automation vendors have repositioned themselves as tech companies, a flurry of startups have entered the market, and building owners have become increasingly aware of the business value of integrating energy and operations management technologies.  Navigant Research expects to see a shift from the rash of acquisitions that dominated the smart buildings news a few years ago to partnerships shaping the market’s near future.  Companies are coming together to help customers overcome the challenges of enterprise awareness and integration and to make energy service offerings even smarter.

Enterprise Awareness

Even as the economy improves, many customers resist investing in energy efficiency.  The upfront capital costs of systems integration and equipment upgrades can be a daunting proposition for building owners and managers still learning the business value of intelligent energy and operational management.  Yet, a growing number of startups are finding new ways to bring cost-effective solutions to market that will help deepen the market penetration of smart building technologies.

In August, for example, Panoramic Power and Lucid announced a partnership to help customers capitalize on enterprise efficiencies through wireless energy monitoring and analytics.  Panoramic Power’s self-powered micro-sensors and Lucid’s BuildingOS software help customers aggregate building data and generate useful data across diverse systems and facilities.  In October, GridPoint and MicroStrategy announced a new partnership to enhance the software platform and visualization capabilities of GridPoint Energy Manager for cost-effective insight across light commercial building portfolios.  These two examples epitomize the partnering activity in the market that’s helping customers realize the benefits of smart building technologies at lower costs.

Enhanced Energy Services

Energy and engineering service companies are also seeing the benefits of partnering to bring smart building technologies to their customers.  AtSite is now enhancing its smart building professional services with the BuildingIQ Predictive Energy Optimization software.  The collaboration converges cloud-based software analytics with engineering expertise to elevate the service offerings to their customers.  ForceField Energy has partnered with Noveda to enhance its energy service company (ESCO) offerings with the IntelliNET Luminaire Management System (LMS) offering.  These partnerships illustrate how smart building technologies can generate new efficiencies and insights for professional service providers and differentiate offerings to customers who increasingly demand data-driven decision support.

Navigant Research will continue to track how new partnership models unfold in 2015 and whether these companies can successfully utilize their individual core competencies to deepen market penetration and expand the market for smart building technologies.

 

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