Navigant Research Blog

With Gas Prices Low, EV Drivers Adjust to Timely Price Info

— January 22, 2015

While the falling price of gasoline is welcome news for many drivers, it undercuts the financial argument for driving a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV).  On a per-mile basis, electricity in the United States is between 20% to 35% of the cost of driving a gasoline-powered car, depending on the utility rates and gas taxes.  Avoiding paying $50 or more for a weekly fill-up on gas compared to around $40 per month for charging an EV gives EV drivers financial satisfaction.

Gas has dipped below $2 in some states, and U.S. sales of plug-in hybrids have simultaneously slumped, falling 26% in November 2014 versus a year ago, according to HybridCars.com.  However, EV economics can be further improved by charging off-peak, and recent studies show that not only are significant savings possible, but also that consumers will adjust their charging to take advantage of the lower rates.

Time to Charge

A recent demonstration that provided EV owners with timely information about the cost of electricity and grid health indicates that the cost of charging can be reduced by up to 60% through smart charging.  Customers in the study had access to hourly utility rates through a connection to the Siemens energy cloud, and charging power levels were alternated based on the needs of the grid.  The study was performed by Duke Energy and Siemens and delivered charging information to mobile phones, tablets, and computers, enabling EV drivers to schedule charging based on the anticipated costs given the varying rates at different times of the day.

Siemens delivered electricity rate information via its computing cloud using the OpenADR demand response protocol, which enables energy-consuming devices (including charging stations) to respond to grid conditions.  The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has established many standards for communications between charging stations and EVs; others, including the CEA-2045 modular communications interface standard, enable communications between charging stations with smart meters and home networking devices.

A Bad Connection

Meanwhile, in December, the U.S. Department of Energy published a report summarizing six projects related to EV charging that were funded in 2009 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  Entitled Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging Behaviors, the report states that when provided with discounted overnight rates for EV charging, consumers will adapt their charging habits.  “Customers took advantage of time-based rates to save on overnight residential charging” when they were able to pre-program charging, according to the report.  Convenience in managing charging is viewed as essential to minimize the cost of EV charging.

The report also points out that work needs to continue on connecting EV chargers with smart grid devices.  The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), which was one of the six utilities managing the projects, found that charging equipment “successfully connected to SMUD meters about 50% of the time for several reasons, including poor ZigBee radio signal quality (often range related), problems with power supply circuits in the EVSE [electric vehicle supply equipment] communications module packet loss recovery, and environmental interference.”

Simplifying and reducing the cost of EV charging is critical to convincing more consumers to opt for EVs over conventional vehicles –  especially when prices at the pump are low.

 

Solar-Powered EV Charging Network Takes Shape in Jordan

— January 5, 2015

Jordan is now among the growing list of countries intent on encouraging electric vehicle (EV) usage to reduce emissions and increase domestic energy security.  Strategically located between Israel and Saudi Arabia, Jordan has waived the import tariffs on EVs (which otherwise could double the price of a vehicle) and is embarking on a $120 million project to install a national network of solar-powered EV charging stations.

The plan is for 3,000 charging stations and 30 MW of solar power to be installed, with the first 11 charging stations to be placed in the capital of Amman.  Jordan imports 95% of its energy, according to Said Al-Hallaj, the chairman and CEO of AllCell Technologies, which is leading the consortium that will build the charging network.  Other participants include Hyseo International of France, which will provide solar systems for the charging stations, and the U.S. subsidiary of French supplier DBT, which will provide the charging equipment.

Greening the Desert

The Jordanian government views EVs as cost-effective since electricity is approximately 25% of the cost of gasoline as a fuel in Jordan.  While the price of crude oil and gasoline in many regions were in free fall during the second half of 2014, the current low prices are likely temporary in nature.

Some of the charging stations will have solar canopies, while others will use energy from nearby solar farms.  Shopping malls, tourist destinations, and parking lots are likely locations for the first charging stations, Al-Hallaj told me in an interview.  In 2013, Jordan’s Ministry of the Environment first began evaluating the use of EVs for the public transit fleet, according to The Jordan Times.

Al-Hallaj, who is Jordanian and leads AllCell from its headquarters in Chicago, said funding for the project  will come from the USAID Jordan Competitiveness Program (JCP), which has the goal of creating jobs and increasing the country’s competitiveness in technology, healthcare, and energy.  He expects sales of EVs in the country to be around 10,000 annually.  AllCell will provide the battery packs that will be used to store the solar energy that would be used to power the charging network.

Since transportation is a major producer of greenhouse gases, “the EV is considered to be an integral part of [the Jordanian] Ministry’s drive to support and strengthen our national Green Economy,” said Raouf Dabbas, Jordan’s senior ministry of environment advisor, in an email.

 

“Costly” Amtrak Payments Dwarfed by Parking Largesse

— December 16, 2014

Rail service company Amtrak posted its annual financial report on November 25, and progress was reported all around.  Revenue ($3.2 billion) and ridership (31.6 million passengers) are up over the previous year, and the operating loss of $227 million was the lowest since way back in 1973.  However, the loss would have been much greater if not for payments from states and the federal government, which pony up nearly $2 billion annually to support infrastructure upgrades and other costs.

Amtrak is profitable in the Northeast, where it is viewed as indispensable for commuting along the I-95 corridor from Boston to Washington, D.C., but runs far in the red elsewhere, especially on long-distance routes.  For fiscal year 2015, Amtrak has requested a federal grant of $1.6 billion, and the number gets higher each year to counter the tunnels, bridges, and tracks that continue to fall into disrepair.

No Free Parking

Perpetually deficit-running Amtrak is a favorite target for fiscal conservatives, such as Mitt Romney, who frequently spoke of defunding the service during the 2012 presidential election.  However, the federal government is actually funding the parking of private vehicles at a much higher level.  According to a new report by the TransitCenter and the Frontier Group, employers providing tax-free parking allowances cost the federal government $7.3 billion annually in lost revenue.

The Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS’) tax code allows parking allowances of up to $250 per month sans taxes, which is nearly twice the amount allowable for taking public transit ($130), and more than 10 times the allowance for bicycle commuters ($20).  The study claims that the tax abatement adds approximately 820,000 commuters who would otherwise find other means of getting to work, including motorists who increase use of roads, another hidden cost to taxpayers.

The True Costs

According to Streetsblog.org, Congress is violating the IRS maximum parking allowance by providing free street parking to staffers in pricey downtown D.C.  So we have CAFE regulations aimed at reducing transportation emissions by requiring carmakers to invest billions to produce increasingly fuel efficient vehicles, while at the same time, we subsidize the use of private vehicles in congested urban areas at a cost more than 3 times the total spent to support Amtrak.  Taken together, these policies can be viewed as somewhere between inconsistent and outright contradictory.

 

Street Lights Add EV Charging

— December 11, 2014

Sometimes a solution forms at the intersection of two challenges that may not seem, at first glance, to have anything in common.  For example, cities are perpetually seeking ways to increase revenue, and many owners of electric vehicles (EVs) want access to ubiquitous charging infrastructure.

Enter the new concept of retrofitting street lights with money-saving LEDs and EV charging ports.  City managers are moving toward central control of street lights by adding a control node, which enables them to reduce cost and integrate the lights with other systems, as my colleague Jesse Foote recently wrote.  With smart street lighting technology (as covered in Navigant Research’s report, Smart Street Lighting) in place, EV charging capabilities can also be added to street lights, creating a new revenue stream for municipalities.

A Light and a Charge

Among the first pilots of this combination are occurring in the cities of Munich in Germany, Aix-en-Provence in France, and Brasov in Romania.  BMW has two such lights at its headquarters in Munich and will add a series of enhanced lights in the city next year.  A consortium called Telewatt, led by lighting manufacturer Citelum, is similarly installing LED street lights with EV charging in Aix-en-Provence.  In Romania, local company Flashnet has integrated its inteliLIGHT management platform with an EV charger.

Motorists can pay for the EV charging using a mobile phone app.  Cities that have regulations allowing them to provide EV charging services can gain revenue to help balance the books.  They can also balance the additional power demand of EVs within their overall power management system.  Placing a Level 1 or Level 2 charging outlet on a light pole reduces the installation cost of bringing power to the curb, which otherwise can be several times greater than the cost of the equipment.  Cities that install these systems will help drive demand for EVs, which has the added benefit of increasing urban air quality.

This is another example of the integration of seemingly disparate city services into a smart city.  As detailed by Navigant Research’s Smart Cities Research Service, the move toward integrating power, water, transportation, waste, and building management will yield considerable savings while improving the quality of urban life for city dwellers.

 

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