Navigant Research Blog

Differing Diesel Views Sow Auto Industry Confusion

— February 17, 2015

During January’s North American International Auto Show (NAIAS), several manufacturers announced new diesel models to help them meet increasingly stringent fuel economy standards. Nissan unveiled a second-generation Titan XD that straddles the line between light and heavy duty pickups. Nissan will initially build the Titan XD, scheduled to launch this fall, with only a diesel engine; gas trucks with V6 and V8 engines will come later.

GM will be introducing a diesel engine in its Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon later this year that could potentially increase fuel economy from the current 27 mpg to 30 mpg. Fiat Chrysler announced it will be increasing production of the Dodge Ram 1500 EcoDiesel pickup from 10% of models to 20%.

In the world of diesel cars, Volkswagen will unveil the Golf Gran Turismo Diesel (GTD) car at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show in March. Later this year, Suzuki will add an automatic transmission and several other updates to its SX4 S-Cross.

A Particular Problem

Diesel cars and trucks usually attain higher fuel economy ratings than their gasoline counterparts. According to Navigant Research’s report, Automotive Fuel Efficiency Technologies, the share of diesel cars and light trucks in North America is expected to increase from 1% in 2015 to 2.8% in 2025 as automakers continue to introduce more fuel-efficient models.

However, across the Atlantic, cities are looking to decrease the number of diesel vehicles driving in urban areas due to concerns that diesel vehicles’ higher levels of particulate emissions are causing environmental and health problems.

Not in My Town

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has designs on eliminating diesel vehicles from her city by 2020. Mayor Hidalgo recently announced a ban on some diesel delivery trucks and buses, beginning by July 2015. According to Paris24.com, Hidalgo will provide significant financial incentives for investing in less polluting vehicles. London Mayor Boris Johnson has similar concerns around particulate emissions and is doubling the congestion charges for driving diesel vehicles in the city center to £20.

One solution to reduce the amount of diesel emissions is to add a hybrid drivetrain to a diesel vehicle. Hybrid vehicles reduce the use of the diesel engine by relying on battery power during low speeds and when idling, thus reducing particulate emissions. According to Navigant Research’s report, Electric Drive Trucks and Buses, the currently small market for medium and heavy duty diesel hybrid trucks will grow by a 2014–2023 compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 28.5% to nearly 95,000 units worldwide by 2023.

 

2018: When EVs Will Change Everything

— February 11, 2015

Disruptive technologies don’t appear overnight. They come in gradual iterations until refinements and related technologies evolve to a point when they become so overwhelmingly useful that they are viewed as a necessary replacement for what came before.

While plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have come a long way since their introduction in the 1990s, they are not viewed by the general public as must-haves today, due to their higher prices and driving range limitations.  However, the next generation of PEVs, due to arrive in 3 years, will likely have a combination of features and prices that will convince most car buyers that driving a car with an internal combustion engine is a habit worth breaking.

Compare the development of PEVs to that of the smartphone. GM’s EV1 was the first significant PEV available in the 1990s, and its limitations in driving range and overall comfort prevented it and other PEVs of that era from catching on with consumers.

The evolution of smartphones can also be traced back to the early 1990s, when handheld personal digital assistants included an operating system with personal productivity features, and the first mobile phones that enabled talking (almost) anywhere became available. While these innovations quickly became popular with geeks and aficionados, they didn’t exactly capture a mass market.

10 Years After

Flash forward to 2009, and along came the Nissan LEAF and Chevrolet Volt, which took advantage of advances in battery technology, electric drive, display screens, navigation, and faster wireless communications to provide a driving experience that in most respects is superior to your father’s gas car. Most people have at least heard of a PEV by now, though PEV sales in the United States in 2014 were still less than 1% of all new light duty vehicles.

It similarly took more than a decade for personal digital assistants and mobile phones to converge, and for the then rudimentary technologies to be enhanced with better display screens and wireless connectivity, and new applications including texting, navigation, data sharing, and voice commands. For smart phones, the Blackberry, Windows smart phones, and then the iPhone became must-have devices that initially came with a high premium, but within a few years other manufacturers prompted competition that put this combination of features within reach of most consumers.

Tipping Point

That hasn’t happened yet with PEVs. But by 2018 we’ll have the Tesla Model 3 and the Chevrolet Bolt, which will package new technologies and driving enhancements to further separate PEVs from the pack. Anticipation for the Model 3’s extended range and Model S-like performance has been building since it was first announced, in 2013. The Chevrolet Bolt concept, which was announced at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in January 2015, promises similar or better range for a lower price.

GM has said that owners will be able to start the Bolt with a smartphone application, and that ride-sharing and self-parking features will be included with the vehicles. Some of these features may be available in conventional cars by that time, but with the Bolt (and likely other PEVs), you’ll get them all under one roof for around $30,000, along with  superior electric drive performance and the savings and convenience of driving on electricity.

As with Apple and Samsung in the mobile device sector, Tesla and GM aspire to be the agents of change, and for now we can only guess at the electric alternatives that Nissan, Ford, Volkswagen/Audi, BMW, and Daimler will have at dealerships in 2018. Like smartphones, PEVs have certainly had their shares of missteps in their march toward ubiquity, but as Albert Einstein said, “Failure is success in progress.”

 

With Gas Prices Low, EV Drivers Adjust to Timely Price Info

— January 22, 2015

While the falling price of gasoline is welcome news for many drivers, it undercuts the financial argument for driving a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV).  On a per-mile basis, electricity in the United States is between 20% to 35% of the cost of driving a gasoline-powered car, depending on the utility rates and gas taxes.  Avoiding paying $50 or more for a weekly fill-up on gas compared to around $40 per month for charging an EV gives EV drivers financial satisfaction.

Gas has dipped below $2 in some states, and U.S. sales of plug-in hybrids have simultaneously slumped, falling 26% in November 2014 versus a year ago, according to HybridCars.com.  However, EV economics can be further improved by charging off-peak, and recent studies show that not only are significant savings possible, but also that consumers will adjust their charging to take advantage of the lower rates.

Time to Charge

A recent demonstration that provided EV owners with timely information about the cost of electricity and grid health indicates that the cost of charging can be reduced by up to 60% through smart charging.  Customers in the study had access to hourly utility rates through a connection to the Siemens energy cloud, and charging power levels were alternated based on the needs of the grid.  The study was performed by Duke Energy and Siemens and delivered charging information to mobile phones, tablets, and computers, enabling EV drivers to schedule charging based on the anticipated costs given the varying rates at different times of the day.

Siemens delivered electricity rate information via its computing cloud using the OpenADR demand response protocol, which enables energy-consuming devices (including charging stations) to respond to grid conditions.  The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has established many standards for communications between charging stations and EVs; others, including the CEA-2045 modular communications interface standard, enable communications between charging stations with smart meters and home networking devices.

A Bad Connection

Meanwhile, in December, the U.S. Department of Energy published a report summarizing six projects related to EV charging that were funded in 2009 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  Entitled Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging Behaviors, the report states that when provided with discounted overnight rates for EV charging, consumers will adapt their charging habits.  “Customers took advantage of time-based rates to save on overnight residential charging” when they were able to pre-program charging, according to the report.  Convenience in managing charging is viewed as essential to minimize the cost of EV charging.

The report also points out that work needs to continue on connecting EV chargers with smart grid devices.  The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), which was one of the six utilities managing the projects, found that charging equipment “successfully connected to SMUD meters about 50% of the time for several reasons, including poor ZigBee radio signal quality (often range related), problems with power supply circuits in the EVSE [electric vehicle supply equipment] communications module packet loss recovery, and environmental interference.”

Simplifying and reducing the cost of EV charging is critical to convincing more consumers to opt for EVs over conventional vehicles –  especially when prices at the pump are low.

 

Solar-Powered EV Charging Network Takes Shape in Jordan

— January 5, 2015

Jordan is now among the growing list of countries intent on encouraging electric vehicle (EV) usage to reduce emissions and increase domestic energy security.  Strategically located between Israel and Saudi Arabia, Jordan has waived the import tariffs on EVs (which otherwise could double the price of a vehicle) and is embarking on a $120 million project to install a national network of solar-powered EV charging stations.

The plan is for 3,000 charging stations and 30 MW of solar power to be installed, with the first 11 charging stations to be placed in the capital of Amman.  Jordan imports 95% of its energy, according to Said Al-Hallaj, the chairman and CEO of AllCell Technologies, which is leading the consortium that will build the charging network.  Other participants include Hyseo International of France, which will provide solar systems for the charging stations, and the U.S. subsidiary of French supplier DBT, which will provide the charging equipment.

Greening the Desert

The Jordanian government views EVs as cost-effective since electricity is approximately 25% of the cost of gasoline as a fuel in Jordan.  While the price of crude oil and gasoline in many regions were in free fall during the second half of 2014, the current low prices are likely temporary in nature.

Some of the charging stations will have solar canopies, while others will use energy from nearby solar farms.  Shopping malls, tourist destinations, and parking lots are likely locations for the first charging stations, Al-Hallaj told me in an interview.  In 2013, Jordan’s Ministry of the Environment first began evaluating the use of EVs for the public transit fleet, according to The Jordan Times.

Al-Hallaj, who is Jordanian and leads AllCell from its headquarters in Chicago, said funding for the project  will come from the USAID Jordan Competitiveness Program (JCP), which has the goal of creating jobs and increasing the country’s competitiveness in technology, healthcare, and energy.  He expects sales of EVs in the country to be around 10,000 annually.  AllCell will provide the battery packs that will be used to store the solar energy that would be used to power the charging network.

Since transportation is a major producer of greenhouse gases, “the EV is considered to be an integral part of [the Jordanian] Ministry’s drive to support and strengthen our national Green Economy,” said Raouf Dabbas, Jordan’s senior ministry of environment advisor, in an email.

 

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