Navigant Research Blog

Storage in the Northwest: Overview of Threats and Opportunities

— October 10, 2017

Last week I had the opportunity to open up day 2 of the Northwest Demand Response + Energy Storage Summit. I gave an overview of what is happening with energy storage in the Pacific Northwest.

What Is the Current Market?

The region has a long history with pumped and dispatchable hydropower, so energy storage is not a new concept. However, battery powered systems are relatively new. Since 2010, many utilities have deployed 22 MW worth of projects for research, development, and pilots. Some of the larger projects include Portland General Electric’s Salem Smart Power Center and Puget Sound Energy’s Glacier Project. In the near term, the region’s pipeline for non-hydro project is small, but several drivers are quickly changing that.

Energy Storage Tracker for Oregon, Washington, Idaho, British Columbia, and Montana

(Source: Navigant)

What Is Driving Growth?

Key drivers for new storage developments include resilience needs, evolving business models, renewables integration, and greater access to financing, but the largest drivers are the following:

  • Policy: In Oregon, House Bill 2193 is requiring all investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to procure at least 5 MWh (but up to 1% of 2014 peak load) worth of energy storage. In Washington, the Clean Energy Fund has sponsored many storage demonstrations and the Utilities and Transportation Commission has directed all IOUs to include energy storage in their integrated resource plans.
  • Improving project economics: Energy storage costs continue to fall and we expect that to continue. Falling costs make energy storage competitive in more and more applications.
  • Customer interest: Customers of all types—from residential to large industrial—are getting interested in energy storage to help manage energy costs, provide resilience, and support sustainability.

What Barriers Does Storage Face in the Region?

Potential barriers that could slow down storage deployment in the region include the following:

  • Business models: Not finding the right regulatory and business models that allow a range of values to be captured for individual projects.
  • Pilots and projects: Poorly executed and evaluated pilots and early projects.
  • Technology issues: Technology—including communications, data gathering and management, and operations—that is not ready for energy storage.

Click here for a copy of my presentation.

 

Saving the Sun for Later: Opportunities and Barriers for Solar PV plus Energy Storage

— June 22, 2017

At the recent Better Buildings Summit, I had the opportunity to moderate a session with Karen Butterfield of Stem, Ben Myers of Boston Properties, and Jessie Denver with the City of San Francisco to discuss their strategies and experiences related to adopting solar PV plus energy storage. It was a spirited discussion and we received in-depth, informed questions from the audience on feasibility, system costs, lessons learned, and how to make the business case for project deployments.

Lessons Learned

Stem opened the session and provided many great lessons learned from its experience to date:

  • Solar PV plus energy storage can be applied to save energy costs and demand charges, but a concise site- and tariff-specific use case is required to make a project work.
  • Robust software is required to integrate building load, solar PV system performance, and battery deployment scenarios to generate cost savings.
  • Utility partnerships can improve project economics and help make the business case.

Boston Properties highlighted that, as part of its sustainability plan, it has installed solar PV at many of its properties across the United States and has reduced its energy charges. The company is now looking at solar PV plus energy storage to guarantee tariff-specific demand charges as well. While Boston Properties has yet to complete a project, it is in the process of negotiating contracts using a solar PV plus energy storage power purchase agreement with a shared demand charge savings component.

Whereas Boston Properties’ drivers were financial and sustainability, the City of San Francisco’s drivers are resilience and sustainability. The city recently won a US Department of Energy SunShot grant to study the feasibility of installing solar PV plus energy storage at critical facilities to provide power in case of an earthquake or another emergency. San Francisco is currently selecting pilot sites and completing its feasibility analysis. As part of the project, the city and its project partners have created a free online tool to help others assess the feasibility of using solar PV plus energy storage for resilience.

Growth of Distributed Solar PV plus Energy Storage

The topics and session discussion at the Better Buildings Summit highlighted several key issues that Navigant sees as important for the growth of distributed solar PV plus energy storage markets:

  • The ability of energy storage software platforms to forecast energy and demand charge savings for anticipated building load and battery deployment scenarios is critical to the business case for these projects.
  • The multitude of regulations and rate structures affecting both solar and energy storage, and their expected evolutions, will increase the value of project design and operating software by helping lower customer acquisition and development costs.
  • As with standalone energy storage deployments, the predictability of costs savings from these projects will further the development of financing innovation to drive the deployment of these technologies.
  • The value of resilience and resulting business case criteria will differ greatly between solar PV plus energy storage customers. For example, the resilience value of solar PV plus energy storage for commercial office building occupants differs from that for a municipality like the City of San Francisco. Building occupants likely have a business continuity plan to address long-term energy outages at their facilities while the city is charged with critical first responder responsibilities in the event of a disaster or emergency.
 

Solar PV on Leased Buildings: Drivers, Barriers, and Solutions

— June 17, 2015

Andrea Romano co-authored this blog.

Navigant Consulting works with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Better Buildings Alliance (BBA) to understand barriers and solutions to promoting solar PV adoption. Currently, we are focusing on solar PV on leased buildings. We have teamed with the SunShot Initiative to develop a request for information to better understand the barriers, benefits, and solutions to installing solar on leased buildings. We are encouraging those active in the solar industry to voice their opinions so that we can develop tool to meet the market’s needs.

Why Leased Buildings?

As of 2012, there were 5.6 million commercial buildings in the United States, comprising 87 billion SF of floor space and representing a huge sustainability and clean energy opportunity. However, a large portion of these buildings are multi-tenanted leased spaces facing a split incentive in that the building owner does not typically pay the energy bills, but would bear the upgrade costs. A number of green leasing initiatives have developed concepts, tools, and guides to overcome this barrier for energy efficiency, but have not focused on solar PV. As a result, Navigant is focusing on this issue in 2015.

Benefits of Solar PV

In many cases, solar PV benefits both the landlords and tenants; however, the division of the economic and environmental benefits depends on the structure of the building lease. The lists below demonstrate the potential benefits.

Solar Benefits for Landlords

  • Reduces operating costs and exposure to volatility of energy prices (due to reduced utility electricity consumption)
  • Enhances marketability of the building
  • Lowers occupancy costs, which facilitates the ability to charge higher rent
  • Improves tenant retention due to lower operating expenses

Solar Benefits for Tenants

  • Lowers electricity costs
  • Stabilizes electricity costs
  • Supports corporate sustainability goals
  • Demonstrates environmental responsibility to employees and the community

In general, for commercial buildings, reducing operating expenses through the installation of a PV system can provide a hedge against escalating energy prices. Buildings may see lower costs of capital and higher market value because of this reduced risk. Depending on how the lease is structured, some or all of these benefits can lead to increased revenue for the building owner. Additionally, solar helps diversify revenue streams, reducing the overall volatility of the property’s income.

Barriers to Solar PV

A number of factors affect the growth of the commercial solar market, with the greater obstacles being the lack of project standardization and high transaction costs. Within the commercial real estate market, owner-tenant facilities in particular have an added level of complexity:

  • Split incentive: Energy costs often paid by tenants and solar PV system is purchased and owned by building owner
  • Short payback requirement: Building owners want 2- to 3-year payback
  • Timeframe discrepancy between building lease and solar PV system life: Solar PV system has a 20- to 25-year life, which is often longer than building leases
  • Property owner creditworthiness: Many properties owned by LLCs without publicly rated investment quality
  • Property ownership entity: Determines 30% Business Energy Investment Tax Credit eligibility

Overcoming the Barriers

While many barriers to installing solar PV on leased buildings exist, companies are developing innovative solutions to address or overcome these challenges. The figure below summarizes the ideas by system ownership. Navigant Consulting is currently working with the DOE and BBA on a guide summarizing these strategies, and it will be available later this summer.

System Ownership Strategies

diagram

(Source: Navigant Consulting)

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies, Utility Transformations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Jay Paidipati","path":"\/author\/jpaidipati","date":"10\/20\/2017"}