Navigant Research Blog

The Dutch Blaze an EV Trail

— November 12, 2014

With the most recent alarming report on climate change from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), governments are once again faced with the question of how to develop policies to address the climate crisis.  The IPCC says that the unrestricted use of fossil fuels must be phased out by 2100.  For some governments, like in the United States, the challenge lies in even getting the public to agree there is a problem.  But even in the European Union (EU), where there is broad consensus on the need for action, it can be challenging to convert this into policies that will successfully drive down greenhouse gas emissions.

One challenge is setting appropriate and achievable targets based on clear-headed analysis, not wishful thinking.  Another challenge is then devising the right mix of carrots and sticks to allow the goal to be met.

The Right Place

The Netherlands’ electromobility initiative is one example of how to develop and implement an environmental policy effectively.  I recently had the chance to talk with a delegation from the Netherlands about the country’s push to promote plug in vehicle (PEV) adoption and its successes to date.  The first and most critical step was recognizing that the country had the right conditions for PEV adoption.  The Netherlands is a small country, densely populated and highly urbanized.   The Dutch tend to be environmentally conscious already, and the country has an extensive and stable grid network (fueled mostly by fossil fuels but with around 15% renewables).  The country also has some of the highest gas prices in Western Europe, thanks in part to the highest fuel tax in the EU.

Given these conditions, the government’s belief that PEVs could find success was well-founded.  The government has set a goal of having 200,000 PEVs in the Netherlands by 2020.  According to Navigant Research’s report, Electric Vehicle Market Forecasts, total light duty vehicle (LDV) parc (i.e., vehicles in use) in the country will be 8.6 million in 2020.  Two hundred thousand PEVs would be 2.3% of the total vehicles on the road.  That may seem small, but it’s actually an aggressive target, requiring PEVs to average more than 5% of annual LDV sales over the next 6 years.   According to Navigant Research’s PEV forecasts, only Norway, Estonia, and the Netherlands have broken 1% annual PEV sales as of 2014.

Tax Relief

The Dutch government offers significant tax incentives for PEV purchases, PEV leasing, and EV charging equipment installation.  The PEV purchase tax rebate amounts to around €7,000 to €10,000 ($8,700-$12,500).  Perhaps more important, however, is the income tax relief on private use of a company car.  A significant number of cars in use in the Netherlands are company cars or cars leased for company use.  PEVs were exempt from the income tax, saving drivers as much as $5,000 annually.

At the same time, the Dutch government provides incentives for EV charging station deployment, for public and workplace use especially.  As of October 2014, there were more than 9.5 million public charging points in the Netherlands.  The effort to roll out infrastructure is supported by Dutch energy and grid companies.

The policies have worked: as of 2014, annual PEV sales in the Netherlands amount to 4% of total LDV sales, and there are a total of more than 32,000 PEVs on Dutch roads.  Moreover, Navigant Research forecasts that the country will actually reach the 200,000 PEV goal by 2019, a year early.

The next phase for the electromobility initiative will see it moving beyond the early PEV adopter phase and promoting further EV charging station workplace and public deployments.  The country’s next target – 1 million PEVs by 2025 – will be a challenge to reach.  But the Dutch have proven that progressive policies can truly shift the vehicle market.

 

Shakeout Looms in Fledgling E-Truck Market

— October 17, 2014

Despite significant government and private-sector investment over the past 10 years, the global market for hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and pure electric trucks has been slow to grow.  Although it’s challenging to get fleets to provide numbers on how many of these trucks  they are running – many companies view it as competitive information –the Navigant Research report, Transportation Forecast: Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicles, estimates that, in 2014, hybrid and plug-in technologies constituted well under 1% of medium and heavy duty (MHD) trucks fleets in North America and Western Europe.  This lack of progress matters, because MHD trucks account for 32.6% of U.S. fuel consumption.  Electrification could significantly reduce this rate of fuel guzzling.  Yet, as my colleague John Gartner noted in a recent blog, there is a real lack of PEV options in the trucking world.

Investment in these technologies has borne fruit, however, and will help the electric drive truck market grow.  Deployments have helped fleets determine the applications for which hybrid or plug-in trucks will work best, both in the sense of being able to meet the demands of the duty cycle, but also providing the greatest fuel savings benefit.  The range of MHD truck applications into which hybrid and plug-in technology can be integrated is broad, with widely varying performance requirements.

Filling the Gaps

First are vocational applications, including delivery and distribution trucks, such as refrigerated vehicles and service vehicles, especially those used by the utility and telecommunications sectors.  And within these segments, there is a multitude of usage patterns.  Delivery trucks may be long haulers, traveling at steady, high speeds; used for suburban delivery, operating with both high and low speeds; or used for delivery exclusively within an urban center, with stop-and-go driving and very low mileage.

All of these variances mean that there is no single technology that will meet all the needs of the trucking sector.  Thus, this sector will be highly segmented, with each technology option fitting into certain niches.  While hybrids have no range limitations, it can be challenging to achieve payback of the price premium unless the vehicle operates with some stop-and-go driving and accrues significant mileage – probably a minimum of 20,000 miles annually.  By contrast, while the range of a pure battery electric truck has proven too short for most applications, these trucks are ideal for deliveries within an urban center.  This application is likely to see more interest in the Western European market in particular, as cities are increasingly looking to limit vehicle access to the city center.

Winnowing Ahead

So, as the British say, it’s horses for courses for the trucking industry.  This will pose a challenge for the sector given the very high percentage of small firms supplying this market.  These are companies that may struggle to stay afloat in a market with low volumes in its early stages.

But pressure on truck OEMs and fleets to reduce the environmental impacts of their vehicles – a major theme of the Automotive Megatrends conference held by Automotive World in Brussels in September – is likely to increase.  A small company with a proven technology will find increased interest from fleets to trial new vehicles and perhaps interest from the major vehicle manufacturers in securing access to their technology through investment or acquisition.

 

Fuel Cell Vehicles Set to Arrive – with Fueling Stations

— September 5, 2014

Heading into the 2015 launch of commercial fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) from Toyota and Honda (Hyundai’s is already out), California and Japan appear to be leading the race to build infrastructure.  In the past 12 months, the governments in California and Japan have each made a firm commitment to support extensive refueling networks.  Japan set a target of building 100 stations by March 2016.  California has committed to providing up to $20 million annually in support of a 100-station network.

Those timelines are aggressive given that, up to now, hydrogen stations have taken 18 months or more to build.  In California in particular, the timeline for building a hydrogen fueling site has been very lengthy, 24 months and even more.  This is one reason that the state has lost its leading position as a first market for FCVs.  A year ago, it looked like Europe was going to step up, with the United Kingdom announcing its own H2Mobility program to follow on the one that Germany established to develop and execute a hydrogen roadmap.  However, both of these programs are moving rather slowly.  By contrast, California secured a funding commitment from the state of up to $20 million per year in September 2013.  Now, the state is moving forward at a much faster pace.   In May, the California Energy Commission (CEC) announced awards for 28 stations, to be built by November 2015, for a total of around $46 million.

New Entrants

Of course, being first also means being a guinea pig for this market, which still faces a good deal of uncertainty in terms of potential demand.  I’ll be outlining FCVs sales prospects through 2023 in my upcoming report, 2014 Fuel Cell Annual Report.  Participants in the buildout of California’s first nine stations learned some lessons that are now being implemented.  One of the most critical differences is that the CEC is using its funding to provide support for operations and maintenance in addition to station construction.  This represents a tacit admission that the stations will be a cost center for owners and operators for the first years of the market.  The CEC awarded $300,000 to four current stations to support ongoing operations.

Another striking difference with the new 28 stations is that only 3 of the 28 awards are going directly to industrial gas companies (IGCs).  In place of IGCs, new entities have sprung up specifically to build and manage retail hydrogen fueling; these entities were given 23 awards.  Startup FirstElement Fuel received awards to build 19 stations.  The company was launched with funding support from Toyota and IGC Air Products but is open to working with any IGC that wants to use a third party to operate a retail station.  The company plans to become an operator of hydrogen fueling networks, similar to electric vehicle (EV) charging network operators.  FirstElement secures a retail gas station where there is real estate available to add a hydrogen pump and takes responsibility for the station once it’s up and running.  This removes risk from both the gas station owner and from the IGC providing the hydrogen.

Quite a bit of risk remains for the CEC in placing much of the responsibility for stations needed in 2015 on one company.  But the good news for the FCV market is that some early lessons learned are paying off in terms of new ways to tackle the problem of providing fuel to potential FCV drivers.

 

Helsinki’s Plan to Make Private Cars Obsolete

— August 12, 2014

Helsinki, Finland, has proposed a strikingly ambitious mobility on demand system that presents the logical extension of current innovations in passenger travel.  The city plans to create a subscriber service that would let users choose from, and pay for, a range of transportation options through their smartphones.  The options will include conventional public transit, carsharing, bikesharing, ferries, and an on-demand minibus service that the city’s transit authority launched in 2013.

The major innovation that makes this work will be an integrated payment system.  This part of the scheme may prove the most complicated to implement, but it is the final piece of the puzzle that makes this scheme truly transformative.  No longer forced to choose between the on-demand capability of private car ownership versus the eco-friendliness of shared transit, Helsinki residents will be able to easily get where they want to go, when they want to get there, without needing a car.

I’ve been using the phrase mobility as a service for this phenomenon, but it looks like the mobile phone companies may have claimed that moniker already.  Whatever the name, the concept is the transportation version of other businesses that are moving from selling a product to selling the service or utility the consumer wants from that product.  Planned obsolescence no longer makes good business sense, and consumers can benefit from constant improvements in technology.  This is most common in information technology (in cloud computing and storage, for instance), but it’s also happening in the energy sector – especially for clean technologies like solar, where leasing programs offer a way to overcome the upfront price premium barrier.

Share, Don’t Buy

Globally, carsharing membership has grown around 28% since 2010, with Europe as the leader in this sector.  Navigant Research’s report, Carsharing Programs, forecasts that global carsharing members will surpass 12 million in 2020.  The rise of on-demand ride services, such as Uber, Lyft, and Sidecar, are also transforming the way city dwellers use taxi services.  Taking on the highly regulated taxi business, these companies face considerable opposition, but at this point, it will be hard to put the genie back into the bottle. Bikesharing and even scooter share services are also spreading.  Today’s young urban dwellers expect to be able to use an array of transportation options to suit an array of needs, at the touch of an app.

Helsinki’s program has the potential to tie into other transportation innovations, such as the rise of electric vehicles (EVs) – more carsharing programs are deploying EVs as a selling point for their service – and autonomous vehicle technology.  Wireless charging would also support schemes like Helsinki’s by ensuring that shared EVs are recharging when parked, rather than relying on the driver to remember to plug in.

Faced with dwindling demand in mature markets like North America and Western Europe, automakers are exploring a range of new services to offset lower demand and to gain a competitive edge.  Farsighted companies will look to begin selling mobility as well as vehicles, changing transportation as much as the IT and energy sectors have changed.

 

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