Navigant Research Blog

Disrupting the Trash Business

— May 5, 2014

One of the hallmarks of human society’s advance has been the ability to distance itself from the trash it produces.  This collection and disposal of waste – a role traditionally played by large waste haulers like Waste Management (United States) and Veolia (France) – has historically involved picking up trash from the curb and dumping it in a remote landfill.  As circular economy efforts begin to materialize, however, and emerging technology solutions increasingly target trash as a strategic resource, we are learning to get a little cozier with our trash … with disruptive consequences for the waste industry.

Solena Group’s recent announcement that it has selected a site to build a first-of-kind waste-to-advanced biofuels facility outside of London demonstrates how quickly the waste industry is evolving.  The facility will produce waste-derived aviation biofuels for British Airways and renewable diesel, as well as excess power for the electrical grid, while diverting 50 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) from crowded landfills annually.

To be sure, the management of solid waste remains big business.  According to the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries spend an estimated $120 billion annually on municipal waste management.  In low- and middle-income countries, urbanization and rising levels of affluence are projected to drive a four- to five-fold increase in waste management costs in places where 20% to 50% of recurring municipal budgets are already spent managing waste.  For upstart ventures, the waste value chain is potentially big business.  These entities are causing a disruption mirroring the  impact of distributed generation on the traditional electric utility business model.

Trash Doesn’t Equal Prosperity

The evolution of the waste management industry is precipitated by two key trends.

First, conscientious consumers who aim to trim consumption excess and reduce bulky packaging have contributed to a slow decline in per-capita waste generation in developed economies.  While the total volume of MSW generated globally is expected to nearly double in a little over a decade, the decoupling of waste generation from GDP growth in Europe and the United States is a cause for concern among haulers.  Less waste means less potential revenue from hauling and disposal.  Like electric utilities faced with increasing adoption of distributed energy resources, there is very little waste haulers can do to stem this trend.

The second trend involves the proliferation of zero waste policies seeking to divert waste from landfills.  These policies indirectly bolster waste’s value as a strategic resource, rather than something to be managed for health and environmental reasons alone.  This paradigm shift carves out opportunities for companies, such as Solena Group, that seek to mine trash for strategic resources and carbon, often at the expense of traditional waste management company revenue.

On the Offensive

Waste haulers, seeking to drive new revenue growth, are increasingly going on the offensive.  Since 2007, Waste Management, the largest waste hauler operating in the United States, has been engaged in a multiyear transformation aimed at turning its business model on its head.  Traditionally designed to pick up waste and drop it into a landfill, the company has invested between $300 million and $400 million in a portfolio of startup waste-to-energy solutions providers in order to take waste materials and put them to their highest and best use.  Rather than pick one technology, the company is betting on a suite of solutions gaining incremental market share.

As Navigant Research’s forthcoming report, Smart Waste, will highlight, the parallels between the electric utility and the waste hauler are many.  To maintain market share, both sets of companies are adapting, rather than resting on poles and wire or hauling and disposal laurels.

 

Distributed Energy’s Big Data Moment

— April 9, 2014

As my colleague Noah Goldstein explained in a recent blog, the arrival of big data presents a multitude of challenges and opportunities across the cleantech landscape.  Within the context of distributed energy resources (DER), among other things, big data is unlocking huge revenue opportunities around operations and maintenance (O&M) services.

As illustrated by large multinational equipment manufacturers like GE and Caterpillar, big data represents not only a potential key revenue source, but also an important brand differentiator within an increasingly crowded manufacturing marketplace.  Experience shows, however, that capitalizing on this opportunity requires much more than integrating sensors into otherwise dumb machinery on the factory floor.

The recent tragedy of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 brought international focus to the concept of satellite pings whereby aircraft send maintenance alerts known as ACARS messages.  These types of alerts highlight the degree to which O&M communication systems are already in place in modern machinery.  But Malaysia Airlines reportedly did not subscribe to the level of service that would enable the transmission of key data to Boeing and Rolls Royce in this instance.  Although data may be produced via a complex network of onboard sensors, it is not always collected in the first place.

The collection and utilization of big data is not necessarily as simple as subscribing to a service, however.  Today, the sheer volume of data produced by industrial machinery is among the main challenges facing manufacturers of DER equipment.

A Different Animal

Bill Ruh, vice president and corporate officer of GE Global Software Center, which helped lead GE into the big data age in 2013, describes the Internet of sensors as a very different animal than the Internet used by humans.  While “the Internet is optimized for transactions,” he explains, “in machine-to-machine communications there is a greater need for real time and much larger datasets.”  The amount of data generated by sensor networks on heavy equipment is astounding.  A day’s worth of real-time feeds on Twitter amounts to 80 GB.  According to Ruh, “One sensor on a blade of a gas turbine engine generates 520 GB per day, and you have 20 of them.”

Despite volume-related challenges, this opportunity proved too lucrative for GE to pass up.  Estimating that industrial data will grow at 2 times the rate of any other big data segment within the next 10 years, the company launched a cloud-based data analytics platform in 2013 to benefit major global industries, including energy production and transmission.

Similarly, Caterpillar is one of the latest industrial equipment manufacturers to recognize the value of streaming a torrent of real-time information about the health of products in order to generate new revenue.  Already integrating diagnostic technologies into its nearly 3.5 million pieces of equipment in the field, the company launched an initiative across its extensive dealer network aimed at leveraging big data to drive additional sales and service opportunities.  Currently, the company’s aftermarket business accounts for 25% of its total annual revenue.  As Caterpillar and other companies manufacturing energy technologies have realized, a healthy pipeline of aftermarket sales and service opportunities is of vital importance to market competitiveness in an increasingly competitive manufacturing landscape.

With distributed power capacity expected to increase by 142 GW according to a white paper published by GE in February, the addressable market for aftermarket DER data is rapidly expanding.  Despite these opportunities, data analytics still represents a mostly untapped opportunity for manufacturers of emerging DER technologies.  Allowing manufacturers and installers of everything from solar panels to biogas-fueled generator sets (gensets) to closely monitor hardware performance, better utilization of data has the potential to not only drive aftermarket service offerings, but also accelerate return on investment (ROI) through better optimization and greater efficiency.  And this is a highly valuable differentiator for a class of technologies still scrambling for broad grid parity.

 

Utilities Enter the Era of Distributed Generation

— March 31, 2014

From the “Internet of energy” to the “utility death spiral,” the causes and effects related to the distributed generation (DG) transformation go by many names.  Faced with what is increasingly recognized as DG’s inevitability, utilities and the companies that supply DG technologies are faced with the difficult challenge of defining viable business models in a multi-dimensional technology landscape.

Former Energy Secretary Steven Chu and outspoken NRG CEO David Crane have loudly pointed out the futility of business-as-usual thinking in the face of DG’s advance.  It’s a mistake to think the power sector is oblivious to the changes enveloping it, though: most utilities do not actually have their heads in the sand, as recent headlines suggest.  According to Utility Dive’s 2014 State of the Electric Utility survey, 67% of U.S. utility professionals believe their company should take a direct role in supplying DG to their customers ‑ either by owning and leasing distributed assets or by partnering with established DG companies.  At the same time, key suppliers like GE, recognizing a dawning opportunity, are positioning themselves for growth.

Tip of the Iceberg

Although solar PV has provided a blueprint of sorts, a suite of technologies – collectively called distributed energy resources (DER) – is primed to usher in a reimagining of DG’s value proposition.  Composed of renewable and fossil-based generation, diverse fuel sources like the sun and biogas, power generation and storage assets, and applications from microgrids to combined heat and power (CHP), DG’s multi-dimensionality suggests that existing business models are just scratching the surface.  An estimated 37 million homes in the United States, for example, now have natural gas lines running directly to them, which opens up the possibility of micro-combined heat and power and fuel switching.

For utilities, the challenge is fairly straightforward.  Demand-side generation is leading to death by a thousand cuts, as the cost of maintaining and operating the grid is spread over a gradually declining revenue base due to eroding customer demand.

In its widely-cited Disruptive Challenges report, published in 2013, Edison Electric Institute lists the financial risks created by DG: declining utility revenues, increasing costs, and lower profitability potential.  Simply charging higher rates – one solution offered by the most entrenched utilities – risks accelerating the revenue ”death spiral,” as rising rates make it increasingly attractive to adopt otherwise expensive DG technologies.  Recent experiences across Europe have demonstrated that utilities must adapt (see RWE) or risk obsolescence, at least in the traditional revenue sense.

Transforming is Grand

On the supplier side, companies like GE are positioning for what is an inevitable expansion of DG globally.  The company announced last month the creation of a new business unit called GE Distributed Power, targeting the global distributed power opportunity.  Merging three existing business lines – Aeroderivative Gas Turbines, Jenbacher Gas Engines, and Waukesha Gas Engines – GE will invest $1.4 billion to combine formerly niche generation products into a cohesive distributed power offering.

The move coincides with the publication of a recent white paper, “The Rise of Distributed Power,” in which GE forecasts that distributed power will grow 40% faster than overall global electricity demand between now and 2020.  The trend, according to GE, is nothing short of a “grand transformation.”  The company estimates that globally, about 142 gigawatts (GW) of distributed power capacity was ordered and installed in 2012, compared to 218 GW of central power capacity.

Four key trends are driving the distributed power transformation, according to GE: the expansion of natural gas networks; the rise of transmission infrastructure constraints; the growth of digital technologies; and the need for grid resiliency in the face of natural disasters.  While these trends are playing out in the U.S., GE’s efforts are focused primarily on the fast-growing Asia Pacific market and the expansion of natural gas.

Big in Bangladesh

The momentum behind DG is especially strong in the developing world, where electricity demand outstrips the pace at which centralized power stations and transmission infrastructure can be financed and built.  The IEA estimates that in 2009, 1.3 billion people lacked access to electricity, representing around 20% of the global population.  A significant proportion of this population lives in Asia Pacific.

While the DG era represents a degree of complexity that has yet to be fully grasped, initiatives from both utilities and their suppliers point to increasing acceptance of its inevitability.

 

Targeting Aviation, Dedicated Energy Crops Take Root

— March 10, 2014

In our forthcoming report on aviation and marine biofuels, we forecast that global nameplate production capacity will reach 2.3% of global jet fuel demand.  This is just shy of 2.5 billion gallons of installed production capacity, up from just under 750 million gallons in 2014.  Depending on whom you speak to, this would be either a significant achievement or an abject disappointment.

For the optimists, surpassing a critical threshold of 1% is viewed as an important milestone in the emerging aviation biofuels market.  Experience with the commercialization of new technologies demonstrates that 1% to 2.5% market penetration often represents a technology inflection point, leading to accelerated market acceptance and diffusion.  Current nameplate production capacity for aviation biofuels stands at 1%, beating Boeing’s target to do so in 2015 by nearly 2 years.

For the pessimists, 2.3% in 2020 falls well short of aspirational industry targets.  The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has set a goal of meeting 6% of aviation fuel demand by sustainable aviation biofuels by 2020; Boeing’s primary competitor in the aircraft manufacturing business, Airbus, is targeting 5% by 2020.

Below Threshold

Adding further fodder for the pessimists, actual bio-derived jet fuel (biojet) production at emerging advanced biorefineries will fall below nameplate capacity.  Note that petroleum jet fuel – a high-performance kerosene-based product tailored for turbine engines – represents roughly 10% to 15% of the refined gallons produced from a barrel of crude oil.  Based on forecasts, the actual production of biojet fuel in 2020 is likely to represent just 1% of total jet fuel consumption.  ASTM certification of green diesel as a blend fuel with jet fuel would increase this share to just below 2%, still a ways off from achieving a technology diffusion threshold.

One of the primary obstacles impeding growth in the aviation biofuels market is feedstock availability.  It’s a multifaceted problem with no single solution.  While aspirational targets may prove lofty, based on recent developments, they may have accomplished their primary purpose: to stimulate industry investment, innovation, and development.

Two developments, in particular, show significant potential despite scant attention in the U.S. media.

From Prairies to Desert

Brassica carinata, or simply carinata, is an industrial oilseed mustard crop with two subtle characteristics: its oils produce long carbon chain molecules (C22) that can be tailored to match the carbon length (C9-C15) of petroleum-based jet fuels (picture a sawmill using whole logs rather than scrap timber); and it produces more fuel per acre on semiarid lands than any other oilseed in existence today.  The result is better yields of finished fuel than soy or other conventional oilseed crops, a significant achievement for an industry aiming to reach a production threshold measured in the billions of gallons.

Agrisoma Biosciences, a Canadian-based crop company, currently has exclusive global rights to commercialize carinata.  This effort is gaining traction in North America.  Technology developed by Applied Research Associates (ARA) and Chevron Lummus Global is processing test batches of carinata into renewable fuels that are 100% replacements for petroleum based fuels.  In 2012, Canada’s National Research Council (NRC) flew the world’s first 100% biojet civilian flight powered by carinata-derived fuel.  While Popular Science magazine named the milestone one of the top 25 scientific events of 2012, the event was overshadowed by a surge of aviation biofuels tests and commercial flights logged that same year.  More than 15 individual aviation biofuels initiatives took place that year, each relying on a fuel blend of no more than 50% biofuels.

Halfway around the world, a team of researchers in Abu Dhabi led by the Masdar Institute, Boeing, and Etihad Airways is studying the potential of halophytes, a salt-resistant desert crop that can be grown on marginal land.  Scientists leading the effort plan to build an integrated aquaculture ecosystem in which waste seawater from a fish and shrimp farm will nourish halophyte crops, which in turn, act as a filter that cleans the water for discharge into mangrove swamps.  The consortium recently announced that halophytes show even more promise than originally expected as a source of renewable fuel for jets.

 

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