Navigant Research Blog

With 3D Technology, You Can Print Your Ride

— September 29, 2014

At the recent International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago, a car was printed in just 44 hours.  A sporty-looking black coupe, the Strati was built using a large-scale printer known as a Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system.  A BAAM can build products that reach up to 8 feet in length, as opposed to the 1-foot dimension now available from desktop commercial 3D printers or at your nearby UPS Store.  Printing the body of the car in carbon-reinforced ABS plastic live at the conference, the demonstrators showed the utility of 3D printing for industrial and commercial products.  Not that cars can or will be mass printed anytime soon, but the cost and time in the engineering design process, from concept to design to prototype, can be reduced for high-end industrial products.  The likelihood of seeing a Strati roll down your street anytime soon is very, very small.  Perhaps if the Strati was printed with carbon fiber or other strong materials from new arrival MarkForged, coming across one in public would be more likely.

The use of 3D printing in the automotive industry is increasing, even though automakers have been using advanced manufacturing for decades.   Ford has used 3D printing for testing axles, brake rotors, and cylinder heads.   General Motors (GM) recently highlighted the use of 3D printing to prototype parts for the 2014 Chevy Malibu, both inside and out.  At GM’s Rapid Prototyping lab, the front end was redesigned, printed, and tested for aerodynamics in the wind tunnel, cutting costs and saving time.  Inside the car, designers are using 3D printing to test the visual look and accessibility of parts like internal trim and seat-back panels.  Yet, it took an act of nature for GM to make waves in the 3D printing world.  In early September, a rainstorm caused flooding in GM’s Rapid Prototyping facility in Detroit, Michigan, ruining equipment.  As a result, GM purchased over $6 million worth of 3D Systems products, including the iPro 8000 Stereolithography printer.  In the small 3D printing world, this is large, as it validates the value of the small form factor 3D printer.

Auto API

Other manufacturers are showcasing the use of 3D printing.  A scaled-down version of Toyota’s FT-1 concept car, presented in April at the New York International Auto Show, now seems like old news.  At first glance, the same appears true for Honda printing 3D versions of its concept cars.  Yet, Honda is going one step further by making the printing plans (the computer-aided design [CAD] files) available for free download, in the hopes that fans will print their own designs, creating a new kind of conversation between designers and consumers.

The most interesting deployments of 3D printing in cars are still in the concept stage.   As part of his master’s thesis at the Umea Institute of Design in Sweden, Erik Melldahl worked with BMW to design the Maasaica, an off-road coupe designed for rural Africans.  Printed from a biodegradable material composed of mycelium mushrooms and grass, the material can be grown in a number of days.  The car would collect ambient water for cooling and local uses, and it would be connected to the Internet.  Melldahl’s bushmobile highlights how 3D printing is changing industry – by enabling the redefinition of what a car is, how it’s made, and how it interacts with its environment and its users.

 

Building Sensors Reach Vanishing Point

— September 9, 2014

Sensors play a critical role in building operations, from safety and security to optimizing building system performance.  Building energy management systems, lighting controls, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are slowly incorporating more sensors as their prices fall and their values rise.  Navigant Research’s report Advanced Sensors in Smart Buildings delves into the future of the market for sensors that have built-in processors, networking capability, and the capability to sense more than one phenomenon at a time.  Yet, as design elements in rooms and ceilings, most sensors, like the traditional thermostat, are unappealing appendages with little aesthetic value.  The good news is that the ugly boxes and knobs are shrinking and may disappear from view altogether.

Redwood Systems (acquired last year by networking company Commscope) recently released its third-generation light and motion sensor.  Redwood’s approach is to capture fine-grain occupancy and light levels to deliver lighting precisely to those in offices who need it, when they want it, even with shifting levels of sunlight.  Its lighting solution and accompanying open application programming interface (API) were deployed at the San Francisco headquarters of the software management firm GitHub, then promptly customized to enable the employees to tailor light levels as they see fit.  Redwood’s sensor looks like a small lump on the ceiling and can even be embedded in LED lighting systems themselves.

Sense of Control

The next generation of sensors may not look like anything.  New materials and manufacturing techniques will hide sensors from view, either embedding them in equipment or as objects to paste on surfaces as needed.  Imagine living in a house with smooth walls and ceilings.  No light switches or thermostats in view, other than as decorative objects.  Norwegian company Thinfilm has developed a printable temperature sensor that can function as both a temperature sensor and display for a myriad of applications.  Funded by PARC, Xerox’s research arm, Thinfilm has focused its efforts on thin labels for consumer products (like produce) that have tight temperature and lifetime tolerances.  Thinfilm has also developed advanced ID cards for people that can display names and access levels to different locations.  With data storage and near-field communications capability, Thinfilm’s products have the potential to leap from smart temperature labels to flat room temperature sensors with built-in displays and network communication.

The French company ISORG is also developing a technology using printed sensors.  Its flat light sensors are designed not for occupancy or light level applications, but for applications where light level variances can be used to control equipment, like consumer devices.  And it just received $8.7 million in financing,  bringing new attention to the printed sensor space.  This technology may jump into equipment themselves, like HVAC fans and pumps, where minuscule sensors can enable more granular control and system optimization.

 

Hidden Meters Provide Visible Savings

— September 8, 2014

A fundamental challenge in commercial building energy management is in understanding where all the electrons are flowing.  Most buildings have a meter that will tell the facility or energy manager how much power is being consumed, and smart meters have contributed greatly to their insight (in some parts of the world, including the United States, groups of buildings share a meter).  And many, such as apartment buildings, have dedicated meters for each tenant.

But to find out how much power is consumed by tenants or equipment, a finer grain view is needed.  It sounds easy to simply deploy more meters or submeters, watch the data flow in, and manage accordingly.  But the barriers to additional submeters, including the cost of deployment and regulatory issues, are limiting their deployment.

Most large heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and other large equipment vendors now sell embedded energy meters with their equipment, making energy management for large systems possible, albeit more expensive.  Today, an alternative is on the rise, in the form of in-line circuit breaker meters.  These devices snap on to the feeder wires of the breakers, recording the power used inside the cable without interfering with it.  All of these companies are touting the fast and easy installation, along with the value of actionable data for facility managers.  These are compelling arguments, especially considering the vast amount of commercial space and the massive plug loads associated with them.

Thinking Inside the Box

A few companies use these innocuous looking grey boxes as the data source to manage energy, displacing the traditional meter and submeter streams and setting up an interesting set of partnerships along the way.   Pennsylvania-based E-Mon sells a line of circuit breaker submeters that capture power and can then communicate via Ethernet (or TIA-485-A) with an energy management system (EMS).  While E-Mon has its own software package, the company recently announced a partnership with Honeywell to use its Attune Energy Dashboard service.   Similarly, Panoramic Power formed a partnership with Lucid, joining its ConnectNow partner group.  Panoramic Power sells only energy services, not the devices themselves, and uses wireless as opposed to wired solutions.

Enertiv both sells devices and EMSs, using Ethernet to communicate with the EMS.  In late July, the New York City-based company received $750,000 in seed funding, indicating the interest in this space.  This interest is rubbing off on newcomer Bractlet.  The Austin-based company, receiver of venture capital and seed funding from Start-Up Chile, sees circuit-level data as a way to validate the upfront costs needed for building retrofits and a way for building and energy managers to measure the value of retrofits.

It’s a compelling business case.  When it comes to retrofits, the first question asked is, “What will this retrofit cost me?” Followed by, “How long will it take to recoup my investment?”  The last question is the most difficult: “How will I know if those savings are actually achieved?” Bractlet, along with its competitors in this emerging space, may have the right approach to answering those questions.

 

Managing Small Buildings’ Energy Use

— September 4, 2014

Engaging the small and medium commercial building (SMCB) market in energy management tools and solutions has been a challenge.  One reason is that the energy costs take up a relatively small proportion of energy costs for SMCB owners, compared to the massive energy bills in large commercial buildings.  Another reason is the lower penetration rates of digital controls and building management systems.  This is forcing major players to rethink how to pursue this market.  Most traditional building energy management system (BEMS) vendors essentially scale down their BEMS offerings for SMCB customers looking for better performance out of lighting and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

A new crop of firms is engaging the SMCB market with a more lightweight offering, not focusing on the details of equipment performance.  In early July, the electric utility Southern California Edison announced a partnership with FirstFuel Software to deliver rapid analysis for improved energy performance for medium-sized commercial buildings.  Using meter data analysis and building characteristics, FirstFuel will identify efficiency opportunities for the more than 10,000 medium-sized commercial buildings in the utility’s service area.  The FirstFuel system uses meter data in concert with general building characteristics to identify general building performance norms.  Following this analysis, FirstFuel develops an ordered list of energy conservation measures.  The direct partnership with the utility means that the best efficiency options will be available in real-time.

Breaking and Entering

The many pathways to engaging with the SMCB market will be interesting to watch.  While there are certainly more SMCBs than large buildings, the level of interaction and number truck rolls will hamper success unless solutions providers can focus on easily deployable tools.  Speaking of easily deployable tools, smart thermostat maker Nest (mentioned in a previous Navigant Research blog) is now getting into the SMCB market with an interesting strategy.  Partnering with Direct Energy, Nest offers a smart thermostat that can be purchased and installed by SMCBs and used to ensure customers’ energy use is optimized so that they can receive the fixed power rates they signed up for.  While this might seem like a gimmick to increase Direct Energy’s market share, it could help validate the value of efficiency management in a tough market.

And that market has potential.  In Navigant Research’s Energy Management for Small and Medium Buildings report, it is forecast that the global SMCB BEMS market is expected to grow from $231.3 million in 2013 to $1.3 billion in 2022.  Corporate commitments to reduce carbon and energy and a drive to reduce energy expenditures make the SMCB market ripe for BEMS vendors.  Other drivers, like regional policies, the increased prevalence of green building certification, and the associated relevance of BEMSs, are growing as well.  For owners and managers of SMCBs interested in energy management, the approaches will depend on their goals.  Some will want fast, low-touch solutions, like FirstFuel’s technology, while others will want the full suite of BEMS services, like that of large energy management systems for commercial buildings.  The dynamic BEMS market will be as diverse as its buildings, regardless of shape, or more importantly, size.

For a more detailed examination of this promising sector, join us for our free webinar, Energy Management Systems for Small Buildings, on Tuesday, September 16.  Click here to register.

 

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