Navigant Research Blog

The Future of Smart Parking Is Integration with Automated Technology

— January 26, 2017

Electric Vehicle 2The smart parking industry continues to evolve as an increasing number of cities struggle with traffic congestion and inadequate parking availability. While the deployment of sensor technologies continues to be core to the development of smart parking, a wide variety of other technology innovations are also enabling more adaptable systems—including cameras, wireless communications, data analytics, induction loops, smart parking meters, and advanced algorithms.

Moving Toward Automation

The future of the smart parking market is expected to be significantly influenced by the arrival of automated vehicles (AVs). Several cities around the world are already beginning to trial self-parking vehicles, specialized AV parking lots, and robotic parking valets.

For example, in Boulder, Colorado, ParkPlus is working on deploying the first fully automated parking garage in the Western United States through Boulder’s PearlWest mixed-use development. The company’s automated parking system uses lasers to scan cars and a robotic valet to park the vehicles. Vehicles are transported by a robotic dolly that lifts and transfers them to storage racks. Using this system, up to 4 times as many cars can be parked in the same amount of space as a traditional garage (since there is no need for extra space in between cars). The automated system is expected to deliver vehicles within 2 minutes of a retrieval request.

Development and Deployment

Somerville, Massachusetts has partnered with global automaker Audi to develop self-driving and self-parking cars. In 2018, a small fleet of cars with piloted parking technology will be deployed to test self-parking capabilities with a specialized nearby parking garage. The idea is that having cars that self-park will help improve traffic congestion considerably as riders could be dropped off in front of their destination and the car would park itself and minimize the time spent taking up space on the road (as opposed to drivers circling several blocks continuously looking for a space). In 2020, phase two of the project is expected to commence with the deployment of a full fleet of self-parking Audi cars. By 2030, the self-parking garage is targeting availability to the broader AV market. It is estimated that parking garages specifically designed for self-parking cars can take up 60% less space than traditional lots (as cars can park much closer together and elevators and stairs are no longer required).

Leading smart cities are recognizing that smart parking infrastructure (i.e., sensors and communications networks) can be leveraged to help enable cars of the future to park themselves. AV fleets are also expected to fundamentally change the way cars are used, affecting how often and where future vehicles will be parked. For more information on the smart parking industry, check out Navigant Research’s recently released report, Smart Parking Systems.

 

Better Late Than Never for Smart Cities in Australia

— December 29, 2016

SmartCityAs noted by my colleague Eric Woods in a previous blog, despite being one of the most urbanized countries in the world (with around 90% of the population living in urban areas), Australian cities have played a relatively small and subdued role in the development of smart city concepts and project demonstrations. While Sydney and Melbourne have been promoting building energy reporting and energy efficiency and a number of cities have sustainability goals (e.g., the Sydney 2030 program), there has been little in the way of significant focus and innovation around the key issues of urban development and sustainability.

Federal Government Taking a Larger Role

However, the focus on smart cities in Australia is now beginning to intensify, as the federal government is taking the challenge of updating city infrastructure more seriously. 2017 appears poised to be a significant year for smart city development. The Australian government’s recently announced AUS $50 million ($35.8 million) Smart Cities and Suburbs Program will provide funding to support projects that use innovative technology-based approaches to improve livability and sustainability of cities, building on and supporting the country’s national Smart Cities Plan, which was launched in April 2016. Draft guidelines for the 4-year Smart Cities and Suburbs Program were recently released, and the first round of grant funding is expected to be opened in the first half of 2017.

The draft guidelines include four program priority areas and their key goals:

  • Smart Infrastructure to improve safety, efficiency, reliability, and the delivery of essential services
  • Smart Precincts to make community precincts more livable, productive, sustainable, and safe
  • Smart Services to deliver citizen-centric local government services and improve community engagement
  • Smart Planning to build adaptable and resilient cities through improved land use and strategic planning

These priority areas are indicative of where many global smart city projects and challenges are present today. If successful outcomes and innovative solutions can be achieved from the new plethora of smart city projects to come in Australia, the country could transform from its current follower position into a leadership role as part of the global pursuit of smart cities.

 

Smart Street Lights a Key Platform for Smart City Infrastructure

— December 2, 2016

The city lamppost is increasingly recognized as a valuable asset that can support a range of smart city applications beyond smart street lighting. There are significant benefits to be had from smart lighting deployments, considering that networked LED street lights can offer 65%-75% energy savings for cities. However, the full benefit of the lamppost is reached when it can act as infrastructure for multiple smart city applications. These additional applications can include air quality monitoring, security alerts, parking and traffic management, electronic signage, mesh Wi-Fi services, and more.

New York-based startup Totem Power recently unveiled its Totem platform for smart city projects, which combines communications infrastructure with energy infrastructure. The company’s prototype lamppost platform is powered by solar energy and supplemented by battery storage to provide capabilities such as Wi-Fi, 4G communications, and EV charging, in addition to traditional smart street lighting services. The first Totem street light model is expected to be released in summer 2017.

Totem Power’s Smart City Platform

Smart Lighting

(Source: Totem Power, Inc.)

Established Suppliers Utilizing Street Lights as a Platform

There is also an increasing recognition by more established players in the market that smart street lighting can serve as the foundational infrastructure for a variety of smart city technology deployments. Panasonic recently entered into a partnership with LED streetlight provider Schréder to integrate its sensors, cameras, and software applications into the company’s luminaires in an effort to transform existing lighting infrastructure into an integrated smart city platform.

Siemens is planning a new smart parking system both within existing smart street lighting infrastructure and in combination with traffic management applications. In addition to detecting open parking spots, Siemens’ overhead radar sensors (in development) are expected to measure speed and traffic conditions, detect parking violations, and detect the flow of pedestrians. Sensity (acquired by Verizon in September 2016) is also combining smart street lighting with other applications, namely with its NetSense smart parking solution. This integrated application enables owners and parking operators to increase parking revenue while simultaneously achieving additional cost savings associated with LED lighting. Established smart street lighting provider Silver Spring Networks has also been active in using street lights as a platform.

Benefits Too Large to Ignore

Using smart street lighting as a platform for other smart city applications provides benefits to both cities and suppliers. Cities can save on infrastructure costs through the integration of several applications within existing street light infrastructure, resulting in lower average project costs (per application) and additional valuable services being provided to its citizens. This approach offers the potential for added revenue streams (for both cities and suppliers) related to the lampposts. Suppliers offering the delivery of multiple services through street light infrastructure have the potential to increase revenue through recurring software fees, since services such as advanced analytics will be increasingly important under a multiple service model.

Cities are increasingly demanding services and products that can be shared across departments, not in siloes. Suppliers offering a variety of services that can be delivered cost-effectively through existing street light infrastructure are likely to differentiate themselves in the marketplace.

 

Costs of Fossil Fuel Use on Society Much Higher Than Expected

— November 11, 2016

Electric Vehicle 2According to a new report from the American Lung Association (ALA), if the climate and health costs of gasoline-powered vehicles were accounted for, the average 16-gallon gasoline tank fill-up would cost an additional $18.42 for consumers (that’s on top of the average price of $35.68, raising the total price to around $54). The ALA estimates that these health expenses account for $11.82 per tank and $6.55 for climate costs. Because these costs are not being accounted for, the public is essentially subsidizing the use of gasoline-powered vehicles through higher healthcare costs and an increased need for climate adaptation efforts.

Carbon Tax and Transport Technology Solutions

While the possibility of a carbon tax being instituted in the United States is highly unlikely in the near term, several other countries around the world have begun to mandate these programs in order to assign a dollar value cost to fossil fuel use that affects public health. Canada announced last month that a national carbon price will be implemented in 2018. The Canadian government has proposed a minimum price of C$10 ($7.50) per ton of carbon pollution in 2018, rising by C$10 each year to a maximum of C$50 ($37) per ton by 2022.

Advanced transportation technologies also offer an opportunity to reduce the health and climate impacts of personal vehicles. While EV adoption continues to be a modest portion of overall vehicle sales, there are some encouraging signs for growth when considering studies on consumer behavior and the enormous interest. According to PlugInsights Research, once drivers have bought or leased an EV, 97% do not go back to gasoline-powered vehicles.

The survey indicates that once drivers have experienced the benefits of EVs, such as reduced operation and maintenance costs, they are extremely unlikely to return to combustion engines. There are also currently over 400,000 reservations for the Tesla Model 3, which looks to be the first mass-market EV designed to drastically increase the number of EV adopters. As suggested by the survey, high Model 3 sales could play a significant role in getting more consumers engaged and committed to the electric driving experience. Additionally, new transport solutions such as Hyperloop One’s high-speed tubes could drastically reduce the need for personal vehicles and help cut down on the health and climate impacts of cars.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Finance & Investing, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Ryan Citron","path":"\/author\/ryan-citron","date":"2\/20\/2017"}