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100% Renewable Energy by 2050

Krystal Maxwell — May 15, 2017

In April 2017, the City of Portland and Multnomah County in Oregon committed to 100% renewable energy by the year 2050. Ted Wheeler, the mayor of Portland, said, “While it is absolutely ambitious, it is a goal that we share with Nike, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, Google, GM, Coca Cola, Johnson & Johnson, and Walmart. We have a responsibility to lead this effort in Oregon.” Other cities in the United States have also committed to renewable goals. Chicago, for example, has committed to 100% renewables for its municipal buildings and operations by 2025. Renewable goals are often tied with increased efficiency in buildings, as this assists in reducing the overall needed energy production, making it easier to rely more heavily on renewables.

At a National Level

Following in footsteps of Portland’s ambitious goal, Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley (D), Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders (I), and Massachusetts Senator Edward J. Markey (D) introduced legislation for the United States to reach 100% renewables by 2050. This 100 by 50 Act creates a plan for 50% of US electricity to be generated by renewables by 2030 and 100% by 2050. Additionally, it would require zero carbon emissions vehicle standards and ban government approval of oil & gas pipelines.

Both Merkley and Sanders understand the importance of local initiatives to propel these aggressive renewable energy goals into reality for the country as a whole. “Starting at a local, grassroots level and working toward the bold and comprehensive national vision laid out in this legislation, now is the time to commit to 100% by 2050,” said Merkley. Sanders already sees these changes occurring, and he believes in the importance of not being limited: “In Vermont and all over this country, we are seeing communities moving toward energy efficiency and we are seeing the price of renewable energy plummet. Our job is to think big, not small.”

The 100 by 50 Act is the first legislation introduced to Congress aimed to completely eliminate fossil fuels for the United States. While it is unlikely such a progressive proposal like this will initially pass, it opens the doors to additional discussions and ideas. The declining costs of renewables provide further incentive to assist in a shift toward greater reliance on renewable energy, such as solar and wind power. Local community initiatives and the individual sustainability goals of leading US companies are helping create a future that does rely 100% on renewable energy. Coupled with these siloed goals, members of Congress will continue to push toward more encompassing legislation, though it will inevitably be a long and trying endeavor.

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