Navigant Research Blog

A Small Car for the Smart City

Eric Woods — January 31, 2012

Last week saw the official unveiling of the Hiriko electric car in Brussels, in front of the President of the European Commission Jose Manuel Barroso.  A trial manufacturing run of the vehicle is set to begin at Vitoria Gasteiz, outside Bilbao, next year and the first models are expected to reach the market in 2013.  Several cities have apparently already shown interest including Berlin, Barcelona, Malmö and San Francisco.

Developed by a consortium of seven companies based in the Basque region of Spain, Hiriko Driving Mobility is taking forward a design for a CityCar first produced at MIT.  The Hiriko has several city-friendly features, but the most striking is its size and the fact that it folds up to fit into the smallest of urban parking spaces.  At only 2.5m (100 inches) in length unfolded, when crunched up for parking it takes a measly 1.5m (60 inches) in space.  The vehicle’s wheels also turn at right angles to help sideways parking in tight spaces and the lack of conventional doors mean that you can still get in and out the vehicle.

The transport challenges facing city leaders were the subject of some of the most interesting sessions at last November’s Intelligent City Conference, in Hamburg.  Amongst lengthy discussions about multi-model transport strategies and the pros and cons of road charging schemes, several presenters raised the importance of rethinking the role of the private car within our cities.  This is not only about the need to encourage EVs, or to accelerate the shift to public transit systems, but also to foster new thinking about car design.  We need to design cars that meet the needs of cities, several speakers declared, and move away from shaping our cities to accommodate cars.

That’s the basic idea behind the Hiriko (which means “urban” in Basque).  The developers say that it’s well-suited to electric car-sharing schemes, similar to those already in place in San Diego and other cities.  Other options might include the use of advertising to pay for the car rental, or sponsorship by hotels, restaurants or other local businesses.  Operators and city transport authorities might also consider time-of-use pricing or incentives to encourage the use of alternative pick-up and drop-off points during busy times.

The Hiriko may horrify lovers of classic car design, but for anyone interested in the future of urban transport it offers some intriguing possibilities.

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