Navigant Research Blog

CPower Reemerges as a Demand Response Player

— December 15, 2014

In October, I wrote about the announcement that Comverge and Constellation would combine their commercial and industrial demand response (DR) businesses into a standalone entity.  The question was: What would the new company be called?  Would they take one of the existing names?  Combine the two names?  Come up with something new?  Instead, they brought back a familiar brand: CPower, the name of the DR provider that Constellation bought 4 years ago.

But this is not your mother’s CPower, according to Chris Cantone,  the company’s senior vice president of sales and marketing.  The C in CPower carries multiple meanings aside from the lingering brand recognition: the combination of Comverge and Constellation, customer engagement, and curtailment services.  “The market has been excited about the announcement, and our channel partners have been waiting for an independent DR provider,” Cantone told me in a phone interview.  The company is still in a little bit of stealth mode as the behind-the-scenes business combination unfurls, but expect a media splash in the near future.

Divide and Succeed

What value does this new structure bring to the parties involved? Cantone says that the future of DR will entail greater technical requirements, which were hard to fulfill under a larger organization like Constellation.  CPower can be more strategic and proactive on its own, while maintaining a preferred provider relationship with Constellation for its customers.  From Comverge’s perspective, there was a lack of synergy between its utility-focused residential business and its market-focused commercial and industrial business, so it made sense to split them up and allow them to build to their own strengths.

So was Constellation’s purchase of the original CPower 4 years ago a mistake?  No, asserts Cantone.  It was an invaluable experience for the old CPower DR experts to get immersed in the energy markets and learn how DR fits into the bigger picture on the wholesale side with generation and the retail side with customers’ energy procurement strategies.   Additionally, the 2011 deal was the move that set in motion the trend of larger energy entities investing in the DR realm, as Johnson Controls bought Energy Connect, Siemens bought Site Controls, Schneider bought Energy Pool (in Europe), and NRG bought Energy Curtailment Specialists.  Will those combinations survive?  Cantone thinks they will have to deal with the same issues that Constellation did, and we will have to see who can find internal solutions and who sets the DR free.

The Real Threat

Regarding business strategy, the initial intent is to focus on the existing markets in the United States, like PJM, ERCOT, NYISO, ISO-NE, and California.  An expansion into utility programs could be the next growth step, followed by selective entry into the burgeoning international arena.

I contacted executives at EnerNOC to get their take on what looks to be their strongest competition, but they declined to comment .  In the meantime, EnerNOC and CPower may find common ground to combat the potential disruption from the court drama over FERC 745 to remove DR from the wholesale markets, which could affect them more than any amount of friendly competition could.

 

The Global Biofuels Industry: A Future in Doubt

— December 11, 2014

In its recent report, The State of the Biofuels Market: Regulatory, Trade, and Development Perspectives, the United Nations (UN) notes that although the emerging biofuels industry has made great strides in the past decade – with ethanol and biodiesel becoming established commodities traded on all continents – significant barriers to commercialization persist across the developing world.  Global biofuels forecasts published in Navigant Research’s report, Market Data: Biofuels, support the view that future capacity deployment is heavily contingent on accessing a shrinking pool of capital investment targeting the industry.

As the UN report notes, conditions in the 2000s that drove annual investment in biofuels in the range of $10 billion per year – including uncertainties related to the price of petroleum products and peak oil speculation – have largely dissipated.  With shale oil & gas production on the rise in key biofuels markets like the United States and the price of crude sliding well under $100 per barrel, market realities have shifted.

Poor Timing

For the emerging advanced biofuels industry, the timing of this macroeconomic shift could not have come at a worse time.  While growth aspirations for the global biofuels industry shifted away from conventional pathways, such as corn starch, to ethanol, palm oil, and biodiesel during the financial crisis of 2008, greenfield biorefinery projects producing advanced biofuels have only just come online in the past year.

The development of these facilities involves capital costs in the hundreds of millions.  Since many of these projects were initiated and financed during a time when macroeconomic realities were quite favorable, a primary concern going forward is whether these first-of-kind facilities can spark additional investment to drive sustained capacity expansion.

This is unlikely given current realities.  To put this into perspective, according to our market data report mentioned above, global biofuels capacity – including conventional and advanced pathways – was just shy of 40 billion gallons per year at the end of 2013.  This represents 4.2% of the global liquid fuel market, or just under 1% of global final energy consumption.

Another $25 Billion Off

Advanced biofuels installed capacity – the focus of current commercialization efforts – accounts for just 1.2 billion gallons, or less than 2% of global biofuels production.  While that’s by no means insignificant, there’s still a long way to go in terms of reducing dependence on liquid fossil fuels, which account for 35% of global final energy consumption, according to data published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA).

In order for advanced biofuels to meet projected production capacity requirements by 2020 under expected biofuels supply mandates in key markets like the United States, European Union, China, and India (Brazil relies mostly on blending quotas), $25 billion to $35 billion in annual investment will be needed over the next 6 years, according to Navigant Research estimates.  This is a tall order for a suite of technology platforms that are not yet at price parity with petroleum-based fuels.

 

Street Lights Add EV Charging

— December 11, 2014

Sometimes a solution forms at the intersection of two challenges that may not seem, at first glance, to have anything in common.  For example, cities are perpetually seeking ways to increase revenue, and many owners of electric vehicles (EVs) want access to ubiquitous charging infrastructure.

Enter the new concept of retrofitting street lights with money-saving LEDs and EV charging ports.  City managers are moving toward central control of street lights by adding a control node, which enables them to reduce cost and integrate the lights with other systems, as my colleague Jesse Foote recently wrote.  With smart street lighting technology (as covered in Navigant Research’s report, Smart Street Lighting) in place, EV charging capabilities can also be added to street lights, creating a new revenue stream for municipalities.

A Light and a Charge

Among the first pilots of this combination are occurring in the cities of Munich in Germany, Aix-en-Provence in France, and Brasov in Romania.  BMW has two such lights at its headquarters in Munich and will add a series of enhanced lights in the city next year.  A consortium called Telewatt, led by lighting manufacturer Citelum, is similarly installing LED street lights with EV charging in Aix-en-Provence.  In Romania, local company Flashnet has integrated its inteliLIGHT management platform with an EV charger.

Motorists can pay for the EV charging using a mobile phone app.  Cities that have regulations allowing them to provide EV charging services can gain revenue to help balance the books.  They can also balance the additional power demand of EVs within their overall power management system.  Placing a Level 1 or Level 2 charging outlet on a light pole reduces the installation cost of bringing power to the curb, which otherwise can be several times greater than the cost of the equipment.  Cities that install these systems will help drive demand for EVs, which has the added benefit of increasing urban air quality.

This is another example of the integration of seemingly disparate city services into a smart city.  As detailed by Navigant Research’s Smart Cities Research Service, the move toward integrating power, water, transportation, waste, and building management will yield considerable savings while improving the quality of urban life for city dwellers.

 

For Self-Driving Cars, Automakers Consult Silicon Valley

— December 10, 2014

The fully autonomous vehicle (AV) is coming, and early models will be on roads sometime around 2020.  To reach this milestone, automakers are turning to Silicon Valley for its expertise in connected devices, the Internet of Things, and human-machine interfaces.  A recent tour of the 18-month-old Nissan Research Center (NRC-SV) in Sunnyvale, California underscored the importance of this trend in relation to the automotive industry’s development of the AV of the future.

While some autonomous drive systems that rely on cameras, lasers, and sensors, such as lane keeping and automatic braking, don’t require vehicle connectivity, the fully autonomous vehicle will.

Reaction Time

The fact that AVs are likely to be far safer than non-autonomous, human-driven vehicles has been well-established.  However, to provide the type of near guaranteed safety the auto industry and customers require, the fully autonomous vehicle described by NRC-SV Director Martin Sierhuis will be “the most complex system in the world.”

For starters, the fully autonomous vehicle needs to be able to communicate with other vehicles and infrastructure, anticipate/predict human and non-human (animal) behavior, be personable, constantly observe and relay information back to the Internet, and act quickly upon information received from all these sources.

Watch for Deer

Information on weather conditions, traffic congestion, and road construction are valuable assets to other vehicles and, in an ideal system, can be transferred seamlessly.  Further, observations made by vehicles can be used to maintain a near real-time map of the world, given changes to road infrastructure.  However, the most valuable pieces of information will be on how AV predictive systems can be improved and how AVs fail.

A major challenge for AVs is the unpredictability of the world.   The awkward four-way stops, the sudden trajectory deviations, the deer on the side of the road, the ear buds-wearing bicyclists in downtown San Francisco, etc. all have to be accounted for.  To function effectively, an AV must be able to predict both human and animal behavior better than humans do.  Predictions are based on data; as more data is accumulated on humans through AVs, they will in turn be better able to predict human behavior and, therefore, safer in the more pedestrian-centric urban environments.

The above are all examples in which the sharing of information from AV to AV will avoid catastrophe; however, it must be assumed that failures will eventually happen.  Yet, the silver lining will be that when the AV eventually does fail, the circumstances of that failure will be shared, and the overall system will learn from it.  As Sierhuis explained, “The same accident will never occur again.”

 

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