Navigant Research Blog

Automakers Go for MPG Records

David Alexander — July 10, 2014

Automakers have had some poor publicity recently, with safety recalls and financial penalties imposed for exaggerating fuel efficiency performance.  In the United States, Ford was forced to apologize and offer customers compensation when its vehicles did not deliver the promised number of miles per gallon.  Honda and Hyundai suffered a similar fate in 2012 in the United States, and Hyundai and Ssangyong have also recently incurred the wrath of legislators in their home country of South Korea.

Fuel economy has risen to the top of the list of factors that influence new car purchases, even in North America, where historically cheaper fuel has made miles per gallon a low priority for consumers, until recently.  Thus, many manufacturers have shifted their marketing emphasis from 0-to-60 miles per hour (mph) times to average miles per gallon (mpg) under standardized testing.

Taking the Long Way

The big problem with standardized tests is they don’t represent anyone’s actual driving, so the prospect of achieving the stated figures is unlikely.   Most people have bad driving habits (from a fuel economy perspective), such as hard acceleration and braking, driving with under-inflated tires, and carrying excess weight around without realizing that all of these factors affect how much fuel is used.   Others make it their life’s work to squeeze the most miles from a gallon of fuel, and there are competitions for those who want to be the best.

Mercedes periodically attempts long-distance driving feats with its production cars.  In July 2005, three standard Mercedes-Benz E 320 CDI cars drove from Laredo, Texas on the Mexican border to Tallahassee, Florida, covering 1,039 miles on a single tank (80 liters/21.1 gallons) of fuel.  This was part of Daimler’s introduction of diesel vehicles to the U.S. market.  In 2012, a Volkswagen Passat TDI made it 1,626 miles from Houston, Texas to Sterling, Virginia, again on a single tank of fuel.

Out of Africa

Now, a Mercedes-Benz E 300 BlueTEC HYBRID has driven the 1,223 miles from Tangier, in Northern Africa, to the United Kingdom in 27 hours, arriving at the Goodwood Festival of Speed with an estimated 100 miles of range still available.  The BlueTEC averaged 73.6 mpg on the journey.  This type of demonstration shows what can be accomplished in a production vehicle in driving conditions that included heavy rain, intense heat, rush hour traffic jams, and significant elevation changes.

This sort of feat is one of the biggest challenges facing electric vehicle sales.  Although few people would actually want to tackle a journey of over 1,000 miles on a single tank of fuel, many people are happy that their vehicles can do that, just in case.  And few would want to undertake such a journey where they have to stop every 100 miles to recharge for a couple of hours, even if there was a network of charging stations in place.

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