Navigant Research Blog

Hospitals Seek Energy Care

Madeline Bergner — January 8, 2015

In December, Boston’s Green Ribbon Commission (GRC) Healthcare Working Group published an energy profile of 22 million SF of metro Boston hospitals between 2011 and 2013.  The report found that, as a result of energy efficiency and conservation measures, Boston hospitals have reduced energy use by 6% while expanding facility square footage.  The study utilized over 18,000 energy and greenhouse gas records based on U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Portfolio Manager data.

One important output of the study is an energy database, the first of its kind in the nation.  The database contains data tracking of different hospital and healthcare system progress toward greenhouse gas reduction goals.  The goals, laid out by the GRC, are a sectorwide 25% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 and 80% by 2050.  Hospitals are the second-highest user of energy among all building types in terms of energy intensity, and healthcare organizations spend nearly $8.8 billion annually on energy.  In other words, efforts to reduce energy consumption across the healthcare system will pay outsized benefits.

In Wisconsin, Gundersen Health System recently achieved energy independence, producing more energy than it consumes.  The system, which includes hospitals, medical clinics, nursing homes, and additional health facilities, set a goal 6 years ago to reduce energy consumption and increase renewables production.  Achieving energy independence exceeds the initial goal, and Gundersen has also reported annual savings of approximately $2 million, as well as energy efficiency improvements of more than 40%.

Federal Programs

In the last few months of 2014, several federal initiatives and studies dealing with energy in hospitals and the healthcare sector were announced.

In October, the U.S.  Department of Energy announced $9 million to encourage investment in energy reduction technologies for deployment in commercial buildings, including hospitals.  This announcement supports the Obama administration’s effort to double energy productivity by 2030 and reduce overall carbon emissions in commercial buildings.

In mid-December, the White House released a report with guidelines to help the healthcare sector become more resilient in the face of climate change and already-high operations costs. The average hospital spends approximately $675,000 on annual energy costs, according to the 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS).  The CBECS data showed that hospitals greater than 200,000 SF  consumed 4.3% of the total commercial sector energy used in 2003, but accounted for less than 2% of all commercial floor space.  The White House report outlines specific technologies that can help healthcare systems, including combined heat and power and fuel cells.

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