Navigant Research Blog

Impacts of the Clean Power Plan, Revisited

Maggie Shober — September 22, 2016

AnalyticsOral arguments in the litigation of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Clean Power Plan (CPP) are upon us. Let’s revisit what the CPP could mean for power generation in the United States.

Navigant’s Energy Market Outlook (NEMO) includes a regional CPP policy with the mass targets and compliance deadlines laid out by the EPA in the final rule. NEMO shows that impacts of the CPP are regional in nature, and in many regions are not as drastic in the early years of compliance as one might expect. In fact, most states do not see additional costs driven by the policy in the first few years of implementation. This is partly due to the fact that the EPA’s final rule includes a glidepath where targets are not as steep in the early years, partly due to expected changes that lower CO2 emissions before CPP compliance begins.

Coal Retirements

Navigant continues to forecast the retirement of significant coal capacity over the next few decades. Our current modeling shows approximately 73 MW going offline between 2017 and 2035. About 40% of these retirements have already been announced, and just over 20% are forecast based on plant age. These two categories can be ruled out as being “driven” by the CPP. The remaining 40% is shown to be uneconomic and is therefore shown to retire in our modeling.

Retiring Coal Capacity by Region, United States: 2017-2035

CPP Retirements

(Source: Navigant)

A decision to retire a plant before the end of its useful life is very complicated, and it is very rare that a single driver can be identified as causing such a decision. The more influential factors we have seen include competition with cheap natural gas and increases in costs caused by environmental regulations (including the CPP). NEMO shows that the largest shares of announced coal retirements are located in MISO and WECC, while the largest share of modeled coal retirements are located in SERC territory.

Renewable Growth

On the other side of the equation, NEMO also includes continued low natural gas prices due to shale abundance, as well as continued growth in large-scale renewables, distributed energy resources, and energy efficiency. Large-scale solar capacity additions continue to grow due to falling costs, with additions on par with wind in some regions. Early in the forecast, solar becomes the renewable of choice in California, driven by the state’s aggressive renewable and carbon goals, which go above what the CPP requires. Wind continues to be installed in areas with high potential, helping states like Texas meet their CPP targets.

Low-Cost Compliance in Early Years

NEMO includes over 29 GW of coal coming offline in the Eastern Interconnection before the CPP targets begin, making compliance in the first interim compliance period (2022-2024) relatively painless. Our modeling of the CPP uses a cap-and-trade mechanism to approximate a compliance framework. Across most of the country, carbon allowance prices are forecast to be zero for the first 2 years of compliance, meaning no additional costs are needed to meet the targets. As others have found, compliance costs are lower when regional trading is allowed. Our modeling confirms that states that go it alone tend to have higher compliance costs overall.

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