Navigant Research Blog

Kansas City Takes a Flyer on EV Chargers

Ryan Citron — February 11, 2015

Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L), announced in late January that it will install 1,000 public EV charging stations in Kansas City, creating a dramatic increase from the 40 stations that are currently available. The stations are expected to be installed by the end of summer 2015.

According to Navigant Research’s report, Electric Vehicle Geographic Forecasts, there were only 2,687 EVs on the road in the entire state of Missouri at the end of 2014. The report also projects sales of 1,615 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) for the state of Missouri in 2015.

With such low PEV numbers in the state thus far, perhaps this move by KCP&L is an effort to encourage more PEV adopters in the Kansas City area. Even California, the largest adopter of EVs in the country, has fewer than 2,000 public EV charging stations. And Missouri, unlike California and other states with high PEV penetration rates, has no tax incentives for EV buyers.

Risky Business

The business proposition for the utility doesn’t look good, either. The network of chargers is estimated to cost $20 million, and the network will be free to the public for the first 2 years of operation. How many years will it take to recoup that investment through added sales of electricity and usage fees once implemented?  Perhaps KCP&L is following the path of California utilities that see significant value in controlling the flow of electricity and re-selling it through EV charging stations. Several California utility companies successfully petitioned the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to allow utilities in the state to re-sell electricity via EV charging stations.

Nevertheless, California has far more EV users and according to PlugInsights, 81% of EV charging occurs at users’ homes, with just 10% of charging occurring at public stations (the remaining is mostly attributed to private charging stations and at workplaces). Thus, even if more Missourians do adopt EVs, the majority will likely be charging their vehicles at home.

Real Impacts

If KCP&L isn’t intending to make money from this initiative, but instead trying to reduce emissions, it would be better suited to convert the state’s existing power plants from coal to natural gas. This would be more cost effective and have a far more significant impact on emissions and air quality. Physically, it does not require much in the way of new equipment to convert a coal plant to run on natural gas. Missouri has one of the dirtiest electricity grids in the country, with coal accounting for a whopping 83% of the state’s electricity generation in 2013.

The map below, from the Union of Concerned Scientists’ report, State of Charge, shows that the gasoline vehicle mile per gallon (mpg) equivalent of an electric car is just 35 mpg in the SPNO region, where Missouri is located. This means that a gasoline car with 35 mpg, such as a Volkswagen Passat, would have the same impact on the environment as an electric car in Missouri (due to the high coal usage in the state). While KCP&L is moving toward removing a few coal power plants from its generation portfolio, an overhaul of the company’s electricity generation sources would have a much bigger impact on emissions reductions than building 1,000 EV charging stations that may or may not be used by consumers.

Electric Vehicle Global Warming Pollution Ratings and Gasoline Vehicle Emissions

(Source: Union of Concerned Scientists)

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