Navigant Research Blog

LEDs Get a Makeover

Madeline Bergner — June 2, 2014

My colleague Jesse Foote noted in a blog earlier this month that high prices, formerly one of the major obstacles to consumer adoption of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), have begun to fall.  In 2012, LED bulbs cost about $40 apiece; now, the price has fallen to around $10.  Price aside, another remaining barrier to LED adoption is aesthetic: consumers dislike the harsh, bluish light emitted by LEDs.  Large lighting manufacturers as well as startup companies have responded to consumer preferences by releasing a variety of LED bulbs that mimic the light emitted from a traditional incandescent bulb.  Particularly as the U.S. incandescent phase-out continues, lighting manufacturers have begun to produce a more diverse set of LED bulbs for different lighting sectors.

Warm and White

Last March, Cree became the first company to produce a LED bulb for residential use that mimics the warm, white light of an incandescent bulb.  The TrueWhite bulb has also drawn customers due to its price (less than $10 per bulb) and design.

Since then, other lighting manufacturers have come out with their own versions of LED bulbs that look like incandescents.  Philips introduced a $12, 25,000-hour bulb in April 2014, and General Electric’s 60-watt equivalent Reveal bulb provides a dimmable LED option.  Ushio also offers a decorative LED lamp that gives off a warm glow.

The variety of players in the incandescent-like LED field is bound to continue growing as manufacturers recognize the market potential for visually appealing LEDs.  Recently, The New York Times ran a feature on a small company called Finally. The startup has developed its own bulb that looks like an incandescent, but is actually a refined form of induction lighting.

To the Streets

In early May 2014, the commercial sector saw the emergence of Cree’s LED T8 lamp.  By bringing down the cost of commercial LED lamps, this product captured some of the fluorescent-dominated market.  However, price remains a large barrier in commercial LED lighting, with the Cree T8 running around $30 per bulb, almost 10 times more than traditional fluorescent lamps.

The forthcoming update to Navigant Research’s Smart Street Lighting report will address the use of LED bulbs in street lighting, a move that has already saved cities around the world millions of dollars on electricity per year.  The emergence of LED bulbs that look like incandescents holds particular promise for more decorative street lighting applications.  Companies like Sternberg Lighting offer traditional decorative fixtures that are LED-compatible and offer a solution to installing energy efficient lighting fixtures in a nonresidential setting.

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