Navigant Research Blog

New Book on Renewables Integration Causes a Stir

Peter Asmus — August 5, 2014

Having authored four books on energy topics in a previous life, I know how it feels to wonder if anyone is ever going to read a book once one hands over the draft to the book publisher.

That’s why I am happy to report that a new book authored by Dr. Lawrence Jones, vice president for utility innovation and infrastructure resilience for Alstom Grid Inc., is making waves.  Jones readily admits that his book, Renewable Energy Integration: Practical Management of Variability, Uncertainty and Flexibility in Power Grids, could not have been written a decade ago.

“10 years ago, when one would discuss renewable integration, there were nightmare scenarios by many skeptics.  Stories of how the entire grid was going to collapse due to renewables.  Literally, some people were saying it was going to be doomsday for the grid as we know it,” Jones reflected during a phone interview.

While one might still hear that solar and wind power are next-to-impossible to manage, “you don’t hear that from grid operators today,” Jones said.

Technical Yet Readable

Jones actually dedicated this book to grid operators around the globe, many of which contributed chapters.  “They really are the unsung heroes and heroines,” he said.

This book evolved out of the work Jones did for the U.S. Department of Energy, which surveyed the best practices of 33 grid operators from 18 countries that managed 72% of the world’s installed wind capacity.  Navigant Research drew on this survey in a report I authored in 2012 on smart grid renewables integration.

Jones found 60 volunteers, among them friends and colleagues at utilities and in academia, as well as analysts and consultants, to contribute chapters on topics such as:

  • Multi-dimensional, multi-scale modeling and algorithms for integrating variable energy resources in power networks: challenges and opportunities
  • Intentional islanding of distribution network operation with mini hydrogenation
  • Every moment counts: synchrophasors for distribution networks with variable resources

The Further Details

The book is not for the faint of heart, but you don’t have to be an engineer to understand it, either.  In fact, virtually every section of the book ends with a case study to provide real-world examples of what otherwise might seem to be theoretical or abstract engineering concepts that could make heads spin.

It’s rare that such a technical book would receive such rave reviews from industry leaders affiliated with organizations like the United Nations, the World Business Council on Sustainable Development, and the Center for Strategic & International Studies.  “There is already talk about a second edition, as we had to omit some key themes,” he enthused.  “For example, we never really got into the economics of renewable integration.  In 2 years’ time, we should have much better real world data on integration costs and benefits, for both utility scale and distributed wind and solar plants, and can therefore dive into those nitty-gritty details.”

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