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Nissan Enters the Energy Storage Market

Scott Shepard — June 19, 2015

Since Tesla debuted the PowerWall in late April, two other automakers, Daimler and Nissan, have announced plans to bring similar products to both the commercial and residential energy sectors. Daimler announced in early June that it’s offering a storage plant of up to 20 kWh that will begin shipping in September. The next week, Nissan announced it will deploy second-life vehicle batteries for commercial energy storage markets through partner Green Charge Networks. The first system is set to be placed this summer at a Nissan facility to offset demand charges. These three announcements are important indicators of trending automaker revenue stream diversification. However, Nissan’s announcement is far more important as an indicator of a strengthening business case for plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) ownership.

Outside of automotive and mobile device applications, stationary batteries can provide energy cost savings to homeowners through energy arbitrage and increased rooftop solar utilization. The same applications are true for commercial entities. An additional use is to draw power from the batteries during peak energy consuming times, which minimizes the monthly demand charge, significantly cutting electricity bills. Further, batteries can be used by aggregators to participate in grid service markets, as BMW is doing in the Bay Area. Though these opportunities have existed for some time, the high costs of batteries have made these investments risky.

Minimizing Risk

To minimize risk, some companies are developing ways to utilize PEV batteries when the PEV is parked. This reduces the total investment, as battery costs are borne by the PEV owner, but it also reduces returns, as a PEV’s primary function is mobility and the PEV owner requires compensation. Utilizing a PEV battery in such a fashion strengthens the business case for PEV ownership; however, the technological and logistical requirements of these business models are complex.

Nissan’s and Green Charge Network’s development of a business model for a second battery life is another approach to harnessing the full potential of vehicle batteries, though without the logistical complexities inherent in utilizing a battery while it’s still in the vehicle. Theoretically, the success of this type of business model would likely increase the value of PEVs already in use and/or play into innovative automaker financing schemes that bake second-life battery value into PEV purchase costs. Both of these strategies would be a significant step forward in strengthening the business case for PEV ownership in high volume economy class vehicle segments.

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