Navigant Research Blog

On the Job, EV Drivers Say ‘Charge It’

Lisa Jerram — September 23, 2013

Both Siemens’ decision to cancel its public EV charging equipment program and electric vehicle (EV) charging station provider ECOtality’s bankruptcy filing highlight the challenges companies face in the public charging market.  However, while public EV charging receives an outsized share of attention in both the media and the EV charging industry, workplace charging is more likely to be the next forefront of charging deployment.

Most EV stakeholders believe that the workplace will be second to home as the place where most EV charging will occur.  One reason for this is the length of time spent at work.  Longer parking times translate into ideal opportunities to recharge a battery EV, or even a plug-in hybrid.  The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made workplace charging the focus of its current efforts to promote electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) proliferation through its Workplace Challenge, which was launched in February 2013.

Within Range

Recent data on the habits of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) drivers is confirming the importance of workplace charging deployments.  The EV Project’s 2Q 2013 report found that around 74% of Nissan LEAF drivers and 80% of Chevrolet Volt drivers charge their vehicles at home.  What’s more, according to the report, private charging units have almost twice as much utilization as public units.  This data confirms that the workplace is the second most likely place for charging after the home.

Another study, which examined the workplace charging habits of 40 LEAF drivers in North Carolina, provides additional confirmation.  The June 2013 report by Advanced Energy, Workplace Charging in the Real World, found that 52% of the participating drivers charged daily at their workplace – again demonstrating that real demand exists for workplace charging.

Of course, if you look at the glass as half empty, this study also shows that almost half of the participating drivers got through their daily commute without charging at the office.  But if workplace chargers become commonplace, consumers with daily commutes beyond the range of an EV will become potential EV buyers.

The Next Frontier

Indeed, the characteristics of the participants in the study confirmed this impression.  The study found drivers with only a Level 1 home charger, and no workplace charging, had the smallest commutes, less than 10 miles round trip.  Drivers with either a Level 1 home charger and a workplace charger, or a Level 2 home charger and no workplace charger, had commutes of 22 to 24 miles round trip.  Drivers with both a Level 2 home charger and a workplace charger had commutes of 32 miles round trip.  While the study had a very small sample size, it nevertheless suggests that more charging corresponds to more consumers with longer commutes who find that an EV meets their driving needs.

It appears that the DOE is right to be targeting the workplace as the next frontier for charging.  Unfortunately, the DOE is not able to provide offset funding, as it did for the public and residential units placed through the EV Project.  The reports mentioned here demonstrate to businesses that if they build charging stations, the drivers will come.

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