Navigant Research Blog

Smart Building Apps Seek Relevance

Benjamin Freas — March 20, 2014

In a world where software applications are replacing bank tellersconcierges, and even opticians, what’s the impact on the role of building engineers?  As described in Navigant Research’s Commercial Building Automation Systems report, the convergence of information technology and building control networks is yielding vast amounts of data.  Moreover, the wider adoption of open standards and the decentralization of building networks make this data widely available.  Against this backdrop, the appification of building management seems inevitable.

Still, the universe of building management applications appears to be in its infancy.  A quick search of the iTunes App Store revealed several available choices.  Apps are available from developers as large as Siemens and as small as Lorenzo Manera (I don’t know who he is, either).  The low barrier to entry in app development means that new entrants are just as capable of bringing an app to market as veteran industry players.

Most of these apps appear to turn a mobile device into another building-level control panel, providing functionalities such as monitoring and controlling heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting or providing some level of energy management.  With the proliferation of open protocols, these types of apps have become easy to develop.  However, they all seem to be equally unsuccessful; none of the apps identified have received enough overall ratings for an average rating to be displayed.

Worthy or Worthless?

Smartphones and tablets provide a slew of sensors and far greater mobility than laptops.  Successful apps take advantage of these features, whether it’s the ability to play games anywhere or to use the embedded camera to snap a quick Instagram selfie.  Residential building automation provides several compelling ways to leverage the properties of mobile devices: occupancy can be set using geolocation, outside air temperatures can be provided through the Internet, and devices can remotely monitor and control lighting, HVAC, and security.  Moreover, an app can obviate the need for a system console.

Apps for commercial buildings, however, are a different story.  Since they’re built on top of an existing building management system (BMS), they don’t replace any equipment.  They don’t provide any more functionality than the underlying system.  The sensors on the device do not provide any useful input.  Some building management apps may aid in commissioning, but the biggest feature appears to be providing another way to monitor the BMS.  The Facility Prime app from Siemens, for example, is described on iTunes as “an ideal interface for non-facilities employees that may need access to live system data.”  Until building management apps can provide more functionality for commercial buildings, they will remain a cool toy for home automation.

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