Navigant Research Blog

Street Lights Add EV Charging

John Gartner — December 11, 2014

Sometimes a solution forms at the intersection of two challenges that may not seem, at first glance, to have anything in common.  For example, cities are perpetually seeking ways to increase revenue, and many owners of electric vehicles (EVs) want access to ubiquitous charging infrastructure.

Enter the new concept of retrofitting street lights with money-saving LEDs and EV charging ports.  City managers are moving toward central control of street lights by adding a control node, which enables them to reduce cost and integrate the lights with other systems, as my colleague Jesse Foote recently wrote.  With smart street lighting technology (as covered in Navigant Research’s report, Smart Street Lighting) in place, EV charging capabilities can also be added to street lights, creating a new revenue stream for municipalities.

A Light and a Charge

Among the first pilots of this combination are occurring in the cities of Munich in Germany, Aix-en-Provence in France, and Brasov in Romania.  BMW has two such lights at its headquarters in Munich and will add a series of enhanced lights in the city next year.  A consortium called Telewatt, led by lighting manufacturer Citelum, is similarly installing LED street lights with EV charging in Aix-en-Provence.  In Romania, local company Flashnet has integrated its inteliLIGHT management platform with an EV charger.

Motorists can pay for the EV charging using a mobile phone app.  Cities that have regulations allowing them to provide EV charging services can gain revenue to help balance the books.  They can also balance the additional power demand of EVs within their overall power management system.  Placing a Level 1 or Level 2 charging outlet on a light pole reduces the installation cost of bringing power to the curb, which otherwise can be several times greater than the cost of the equipment.  Cities that install these systems will help drive demand for EVs, which has the added benefit of increasing urban air quality.

This is another example of the integration of seemingly disparate city services into a smart city.  As detailed by Navigant Research’s Smart Cities Research Service, the move toward integrating power, water, transportation, waste, and building management will yield considerable savings while improving the quality of urban life for city dwellers.

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