Navigant Research Blog

Taking the EV Mainstream

Sam Abuelsamid — September 19, 2017

The plug-in EV (PEV) is rapidly evolving to become a viable mainstream option for almost every car buyer. As ever with automobiles, there is no silver bullet solution. This year there are several unique variations on how best to serve the needs of drivers seeking to minimize energy use as the PEV landscape matures. Navigant Research’s EV Geographic Forecasts report projects 50% growth in North American PEV sales this year and market share of between 7% and 11% by 2026.

Design is always a matter of balancing priorities. Priorities can depend on the target market, how the vehicle will be used, and budgets.

Tesla’s Approach

Tesla is trying to build on the premium brand image it has cultivated while creating the impression of going mainstream. The Model 3 has been promoted as an affordable long-range EV with a price starting at $35,000. That will yield a spartan car. Most customers will actually be paying far more to include current options, bringing the price to at least $59,000, with additional performance options to be added later.

GM

General Motors (GM) took a different approach with the Chevrolet Bolt, opting for maximum possible electric range and utility while keeping the base price under $30,000 (after federal incentives). Even including all options, the Bolt is still less than $44,000 before incentives. While some reviewers have criticized the hard plastic interior, the vehicle’s real-world range, handling, and utility have garnered very positive feedback.

Hyundai and Nissan

Hyundai and Nissan, by contrast, have veered even harder toward trying to maximize the value proposition of their respective EVs. The Hyundai Ioniq Electric and Nissan LEAF both have starting prices before incentives below $30,000 and even highly equipped models will still only hit about $36,000.

The Ioniq, built on a dedicated electrified platform with hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery-only flavors, went for maximum efficiency with a slick five-door hatchback body strongly reminiscent of prior-generation Toyota Priuses and a moderately sized battery. Hyundai aimed to keep both cost and weight down with a 28 kWh battery, less than half the capacity of the unit in the Bolt. With its modest weight and low drag, that’s enough for 124 miles of driving range and a leading efficiency of 136 MPGe combined.

After trying out a slightly futuristic design with the original LEAF, Nissan decided it needed a more conventional look in order to get an audience beyond early adopters. While the five-door hatchback configuration and basic dimensions are carried over, the LEAF now incorporates contemporary Nissan design cues both outside and in the cabin. Aside from the propulsion system, it’s now just an ordinary compact hatchback. With a more efficient drivetrain and battery that has grown from 30 kWh to 40 kWh, the LEAF is now expected to go at least 150 miles on a charge, double what it did when it debuted in 2010.

Chrysler

Fiat Chrysler, which has long derided EVs, has now opted to build on one of its core strengths with the Pacifica Hybrid. Like Nissan, FCA is focusing on the ordinariness of the driving experience with its plug-in hybrid minivan. The key distinguishing feature is that it has 35 miles of real-world electric driving range, enough to meet most daily commuting needs without burning any gas. But as a family hauler that might be used for road trips, no additional planning of where to stop and charge is required.

Buyers of vehicles that burn fossil fuels have long had choices ranging from tiny sports cars to full-size trucks. We’re now reaching the stage where those that want to avoid gas stations have choices at increasingly affordable price points as well.

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