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U.K. Takes the Lead on Smart City Standards

Eric Woods — March 5, 2014

One of the important goals for smart cities in 2014 is the identification and development of appropriate standards to help drive innovation and cross-sector cooperation.  I’ve written previously about the City Protocol as a groundbreaking effort in this area.  Now the United Kingdom has launched its own smart cities framework.  Developed under the aegis of the British Standards Institution (BSI) and with the support of the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS), the standards have been developed by a group of stakeholders from U.K. cities, government, and suppliers.

Smart City Framework – Guide to Establishing Strategies for Smart Cities and Communities has been developed as a guide for city leaders developing a smart city strategy, with an emphasis on practical steps and a conceptual framework that will help them measure progress.  It draws on a series of workshops and stakeholder engagements over the last year, as well as best practices drawn from other international projects.  Significantly, it’s also based on the 29 submissions made by British cities for the £24 million ($38 million) Future City Demonstrator project, which was awarded to Glasgow in 2013.

I gave a presentation on the smart city market at one of the inaugural workshops for the new standard last spring.  At the time, I was impressed by the enthusiasm shown by both cities and suppliers, but I was also concerned that discussions seemed to be taking the initiative down well-trodden paths around local government processes and IT initiatives.  Important as these issues are, in isolation they do not capture the much broader opportunities or the challenges that the smart city concept presents.

Off the Trodden Path

Fortunately, the framework as presented goes a long way toward addressing those concerns.   It was even more reassuring to hear how the cities involved in early testing of the framework have been using it.  At the launch event in London at the end of February, smart city project leaders from Birmingham, Glasgow, Leeds, and Peterborough talked about how they have been employing the framework to build collaboration not only across city departments but also with a wide range of external stakeholders, including energy companies, water companies, and transport providers.  It has also helped boost their work on developing open data platforms and building developer communities to use that data to develop innovative applications for the city.

The framework is the latest in a number of programs to encourage smart city development in the United Kingdom.  In addition to the Future City Demonstrator program, the government has established the Future Cities Catapult, “a global centre of excellence on urban innovation” in London, and has launched an initiative to help U.K. businesses target a £40 billion ($64 billion) global smart city market opportunity.

Over the last 2 years, the United Kingdom has gone from being a laggard to a pacesetter in smart cities.  While other national governments are realizing the need to support urban initiatives, the United Kingdom is now helping to lead the way.  This is a significant step forward that should be of interest to all cities beginning their smart city journey.

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