Navigant Research Blog

Utilities Embrace Innovation at EUW, but Struggle with Culture

Neil Strother — November 25, 2015

There was a palpable buzz at European Utility Week in early November centered around change, innovation, and outsiders. For instance, one of the crowded presentations I witnessed was Neil Pennington’s talk about smart thermostats. Dr. Pennington, the director of innovation for RWE npower in the United Kingdom, noted that smart thermostats are a logical first step, but utilities should consider going beyond these devices and offer products and services that are highly personalized, connected, and automated. Move outside the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system, he says, and think about home security and customer lifestyles if you want to succeed as an innovator.

Pennington’s message was effective. It generated some enthusiastic questions, and people in the audience were hungry for insights into how to engage customers in new and effective ways.

Other vendors and presenters at this trade show, which set records for attendance (some 9,000 visitors from 77 countries), offered similar stories about innovation and change. Joris Jonker, one of the founders of residential energy management company Quby, told me his company’s offering was gaining traction as a dashboard for the home, and that Netherlands-based utility Eneco would be installing 1 million units over 2 years. Indeed, Eneco has embraced Quby’s solution so much that it acquired the firm just ahead of the trade show. Eneco’s move demonstrates it is no longer business as usual for some utilities.

Other discussions included the outsiders, or non-utility companies like Google (or Alphabet, Google’s parent company), and how these firms might alter the utility game. Might Google, or perhaps Apple, or an unknown startup move aggressively with a customer-centric and data-driven business model to disrupt the utility status quo? Possibly, but others were not so sure, saying it would be hard to disrupt the incumbents, especially for smaller players. Still, the question about potential disruption sparked debate.

Beyond these change and innovation issues, several other themes played out at the show. The smart cities concept is gaining wider attention (as my colleague Eric Woods so aptly demonstrated in sessions he moderated), with companies like Itron and Sensus touting their capabilities in this area. And, of course, the Internet of Things (IoT) concept seemed to be on just about everyone’s lips. In that vein, one company that stood out was Sigfox, a French firm promoting its unique cellular communications technology that is designed for low-throughput connectivity among IoT devices. Very buzzy.

But for all the talk about innovation and change, there was an interesting poll conducted among attendees that revealed an Achilles heel for the utility business: an ongoing lack of innovation. The poll asked “What is the biggest threat to the utilities?” The results of the unscientific survey among about 400 people were:

  • Falling/flat demand: 6%
  • Revenue loss/distributed solar: 12%
  • Challenge Renewable/Integration: 12%
  • Regulatory/Policy uncertainty: 23%
  • Lack of “innovation culture”: 46%

So a key takeaway for me from the Vienna conference was that while there is a welcome mat set out for change and plenty of talk, true innovation is still some ways off. And the staid utility culture in Europe is ripe for a shake-up, internally, externally, or from both perspectives.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies, Utility Transformations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Utilities Embrace Innovation at EUW, but Struggle with Culture","path":"\/blog\/utilities-embrace-innovation-at-euw-but-struggle-with-culture","date":"2\/18\/2018"}