Navigant Research Blog

Workers of the World Unite for EV Charging

John Gartner — June 18, 2014

One of the keys to growing sales of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is enabling more people to charge their cars at work.  Workplace charging gives employees a consistent location away from home that effectively doubles their electric driving range for commuting while encouraging employees to buy EVs.

“Workplace charging sells vehicles,” said Mark Duvall, director of Electric Transportation and Energy Storage at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in a recent phone interview.  Duvall said EPRI’s office in Palo Alto, California offers eight workplace chargers, and he often plugs in his Nissan LEAF there.

Companies such as Google, Coca-Cola, General Motors (GM), and others understand the benefits of offering workplace charging and are participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Workplace Charging Challenge, a program in which companies pledge to make charging available for their employees.  In May, GM said that the company has installed 401 chargers for their employees, and GM dealerships now have nearly 6,000 EV chargers in place.

Split the Charges

According to Navigant Research’s Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment report, more than 12,000 workplace chargers will be sold in the United States this year.  By the end of the decade, annual sales will surpass 63,000.

Workplace charging helps companies attract and retain employees who value corporate sustainability.  However, minimizing the cost to the employers while maximizing the utility of the charging stations has its challenges.

The employees who arrive earliest get to plug in first, and since in most cases charging can be completed in a few hours, companies need to establish policies that encourage employees to move their cars to enable others to be able to charge later in the day.  Another alternative is buying charging stations with two plugs, offered by some companies, including Eaton and ChargePoint.  Able to service two parking spots simultaneously, these systems can intelligently divide the available power between EVs.  EPRI is studying ways to increase the load factor (utilization) of chargers on a single circuit, which Duvall says in many cases could serve between four to six PEVs at work per day.

Aboveground Option

The lowest-cost options for employers are to either purchase a non-networked charger and absorb the expense of the equipment and electricity as a cost of doing business, or let an EV charging network operating company maintain the stations and collect the fees to eliminate ongoing costs, according to Duvall.

EV charging station installation can be a considerable expense if additional power has to be brought onsite or if trenching is required to bring power to the parking lot.  One alternative is Envision Solar’s EV ARC solar-powered charging station, which produces all of its energy and stores it in a battery pack, thereby eliminating the need for employers to break ground.  Google has reportedly added the EV ARC to its growing stable of workplace EV chargers.

Duvall will be discussing EPRI’s research into reducing the cost of workplace charging when EV industry participants gather to share their plans for increasing EV adoption at the Plug-In 2014 conference in San Jose, California from July 28 to July 30.

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