Navigant Research Blog

E-Motorcycles and E-Scooters Primed for Acceleration

— March 17, 2015

Innovative product offerings, large new market entrants, and decreasing battery prices are all contributing to an increasingly positive outlook for the electric power two-wheel vehicle industry, which includes electric scooters (e-scooters) and electric motorcycles (e-motorcycles).

An influx of new product offerings and services in these markets is expanding the product options for consumers, offering legitimate alternatives to car ownership, and appealing to new, untapped customer bases. These products and services include fold-up e-scooters, hydrogen fuel cell scooters, e-scooter sharing programs (Scoot Networks), e-scooter battery swapping networks (Gogoro), and ultra-lightweight e-motorcycles.

Warming Up

In the e-motorcycle industry, several large manufacturers traditionally focused on gasoline-powered motorcycles are entering the market and providing new capabilities. These large companies bring brand recognition, extensive dealer networks, industry credibility, and large marketing and R&D budgets. It’s difficult to convince consumers to buy unknown brands in a new market, especially at higher price points compared to internal combustion engine (ICE) motorcycles.

With Polaris Industries acquiring Brammo in early 2015, Yamaha announcing its intention to enter the market in 2016, and Harley-Davidson expected to release its LiveWire product around the 2018 timeframe, the e-motorcycle industry is poised to undergo significant growth and significantly increase consumer awareness and recognition over the coming years. Lithium ion (Li-ion) battery units that would have cost more than $1,000 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) just a few years ago can now be had for about one-third of the price, and these costs are expected to continue to decline over the coming years.

According to Navigant Research’s recently published report, Electric Motorcycles and Scooters, worldwide sales of e-motorcycles and e-scooters are expected to grow from 5.2 million units in 2015 to just under 6 million units by 2024. Due to the new and expected market entries of Polaris Industries, Yamaha, and Harley-Davidson into the North American and European markets, high-powered e-motorcycles (more than 30 kW/40 hp peak) are expected to achieve by far the largest growth of any segment in this market, growing at a compound annual rate of 35.2% between 2015 and 2024.

E-Scooter and E-Motorcycle Sales by Type, World Markets: 2015-2024

(Source: Navigant Research)

 

A Bird’s Eye View of the Construction Sector

— March 13, 2015

From mysteriously hovering over the Paris skyline to enabling extrajudicial executions to repairing and maintaining power grids, unmanned flying drones are finding more and more uses. Recent rules from the FAA establishing a regulatory framework for the fledgling technology has limited many commercial uses. Amazon’s plan to deliver packages by drone may be grounded for now, but applications of drones in the construction industry hold promise.

The current capabilities of drones, namely the ability to fly and take pictures, make them well-suited to create as-built drawings of buildings. Often, as buildings are constructed, the original design has to be modified based on conditions in the field. In order to be useful for operations and maintenance, these drawings need to be accurate and up-to-date. Unfortunately, the accuracy and completeness of as-built drawings are often lacking. Drones could provide a way to document what gets installed behind the walls of a building as those walls go up. Artificial intelligence and image processing could nearly eliminate the role of people in the process.

The Sky Is the Limit

As drone capabilities expand, so too will their role in construction. The Swiss architecture firm Gramazio Kohler Architects has used quadcopters to build a structurally stable tower out of blocks. The drones are able to collaborate and communicate through an algorithm that directs the drones to avoid collisions and optimizes the path for fast payload pickup and release.

A day where drones are used to replace manual labor in the construction of buildings may not be far behind. Construction equipment maker Komatsu has already unveiled plans for unmanned bulldozers and excavators to dig holes and move earth autonomously using data from drones. Currently, the unmanned equipment will mainly operate along preprogrammed routes and have human operators able to take control if necessary. But automating more of the unskilled construction tasks is one step closer to reality.

Do Robots Dream of Electric Masonry Saws?

Though drones are a visible step toward construction automation, they will not be the only robots on the job site. Both R-O-B Technologies and Construction Robotics have developed prototypes of robotic bricklayers. Using robotic arms, rather than drones, the demonstrations have yielded faster production than human workers with high levels of accuracy and precision. Moreover, robots can make construction sites safer. With 796 fatal work injuries in the United States during 2013, construction is one of the deadliest professions. Replacing human labor with robot labor holds promise for a safer future.

 

British Gas-AlertMe Deal Signals More Home Energy Consolidation

— March 11, 2015

British Gas’ recent acquisition of AlertMe, a London-based provider of energy and home automation services, signals that home energy management and connected home technologies continue to attract significant investments. Utilities and others are seeking to provide consumers with new tools to more efficiently control energy usage and automate their homes.

The deal brings AlertMe fully under the control of British Gas, a subsidiary of Centrica, the leading energy service company in the United Kingdom. Prior to the acquisition, valued at about $68 million, British Gas was already using AlertMe’s platform. It had also been a strategic investor in AlertMe since 2010, owning about 20% of the company. British Gas leverages AlertMe’s technology for Hive, a service that enables the utility’s customers to control their home’s heating and hot water systems remotely using a smartphone, tablet, or web browser.

AlertMe was attractive to British Gas because its products and data services are used in 500,000 homes. What’s more, the platform is interoperable, able to connect disparate devices like thermostats or door locks made by different manufacturers. And AlertMe supports a range of networking protocols, including Z-Wave, ZigBee, Wi-Fi, and cellular, giving it flexibility.

Still a Crowd

The acquisition has implications in the U.S. market, as well. Home improvement retailer Lowe’s has used AlertMe technology as the underlying software platform for its Iris connected home service since 2012. AlertMe will continue to support Lowe’s and its Iris customers. Also, since British Gas’ parent Centrica owns Direct Energy, one of the largest residential energy retailers in North America, British Gas expects to offer the AlertMe technology and service to those customers as well.

In a wider context, this acquisition by British Gas underscores the increasing importance companies are placing on home energy management and the connected home. France-based utility GDF Suez recently invested $7.2 million in Tendril, a Colorado-based company specializing in cloud-based technology for personalized energy services. GDF Suez intends to use the Tendril technology for customers in Europe. In addition, solar panel manufacturer SunPower has invested in Tendril, committing $20 million to the company and agreeing to license Tendril’s technology. Similarly, Sunnyvale, California startup Bidgely, a firm specializing in energy customer engagement and analytics, has gained traction, winning new deals for its cloud-based technology with Texas-based utility TXU and Illinois-based ComEd.

Nonetheless, the energy management-connected home space is still quite crowded, with big non-utility players such as Google (Nest), AT&T (Digital Life), and Samsung (SmartThings) making plays and a number of smaller energy tech firms, such as EcoFactor, Ceiva, ecobee, and Tado, trying to compete as well. Consolidation is at hand, and we can expect to see similar deals as the market matures.

 

ConEd Details Its Smart Meter Plan

— March 11, 2015

Con Edison, also known as ConEd, one of the largest U.S. investor owned utilities, has provided details of its planned rollout of smart meters over the next several years. Contained in ConEd’s recent rate filing with the New York Public Service Commission, the plan reflects a comprehensive strategy to make smart metering the backbone of future customer engagement, as well as improve outage restoration, enhance operational performance, and ease the integration of distributed energy resources such as rooftop solar.

The utility envisions an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) deployment over 8 years at a cost of about $1.5 billion—about $8 million this year, $69 million in 2016, $174 million in 2017, $317 million in 2018, and $306 million in 2019. Projected spending details beyond that have not been made available. The approximate number of meters involved is 3.4 million.

Aligned With the Vision

Con Edison’s AMI deployment plan also aligns with the state of New York’s wide-ranging Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) initiative, which was announced last year by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The REV initiative is aimed at transforming the state’s electric grid into a more customer-oriented industry, featuring “market-based, sustainable products and services,” with an emphasis on enabling clean distributed power generation. Smart metering, with its two-way communications functionality, is a key technology for facilitating this type of flexible, modern grid.

Even though smart meters have been around for a number of years, no deployment lacks naysayers, nor controversy. Con Edison is likely to face opposition from consumers who have concerns over health risks, privacy, and the accuracy of the data smart meters provide—concerns the industry says are unfounded.

Take Your Time

For smart meter manufacturers and infrastructure players like Landis+Gyr, Itron, General Electric, Elster, and Sensus among others, the ConEd deployment represents a significant potential opportunity. The utility is expected to announce the bidding process in the coming weeks. Given the large scale of this project, it is possible the utility will choose several vendors or a primary contractor and various partners.

At 8 years, the anticipated timeline for ConEd’s smart meter deployment appears prolonged. Other large U.S. utilities—such as Pacific Gas & Electric, San Diego Gas & Electric, Oncor, and CenterPoint Energy—have rolled out smart meters in 4–6 years. But ConEd may be playing it safe, giving itself enough of a time cushion to overcome the inevitable hurdles and detours.

ConEd’s smart meter plan hinges on regulatory approval, but regulators are inclined to be in favor, especially since the deployment fits in with the state’s REV initiative. And despite the considerable costs involved, smart meters provide benefits to both customers and the utility, and tend to outweigh any drawbacks.

 

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