Navigant Research Blog

Google Weaving an IoT Web

— June 12, 2015

Recent announcements by Google that it is developing the Weave communication protocol are expected to make waves in the building automation ecosystem, possibly to the chagrin of incumbent equipment manufactures for commercial and home equipment. Weave is centered on Brillo, the Google-developed lightweight operating system, essentially a minimalist version of Android. With Weave, Google may be trying to quickly capture the mind-share of end consumers who want and answer to the question, “how can I quickly connect all of my home systems?”

With Weave, all Brillo devices (and Nest) are self-discoverable, making them, in theory, plug-and-play. A consumer could connect the new wireless door lock with the wireless lights, all through an Android phone. The proposed ease of connecting devices was introduced in Navigant Research’s recent Home Energy Management report, as being a challenge for consumers. This integration is contingent on the wireless protocols being interoperable, as mentioned in a recent blog.

Feeling Threatened?

For equipment manufacturers that sell into the commercial markets, Weave poses a threat in two ways. First, this is yet another communication protocol to incorporate into equipment, adding a step to the integration. On the commercial side, integration firms have been stepping up to manage that issue. Weave is not the first extensible system to be developed with an easy user interface (e.g., Android) in mind (see Apple’s Homekit). Weave’s approach is not anchored on iOS, of course, and is therefore more open.

More significantly, the entrance of Google and Weave are expected to force the small and medium commercial market suppliers into a quandary. The small and medium commercial market is vast, and is in need of energy and cost-saving solutions.  These customers do not have the funds to invest in large solutions, and in some ways are like residential consumers; HVAC does not keep them up at night. In this light, do original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) keep selling single end-to-end building automation system solutions, focusing on the value of a single integrated system, or do they appeal to the ease of integration with a solution like Weave? Most small or medium-sized commercial building owners or tenants have heard of Nest. But how many have heard of BACnet or LonTalk?

During a recent Lightfair panel discussing the promise of convergence of the Internet of Things  (IoT) and automated building controls, it was reiterated that IoT-based building integration solutions exist, and are being deployed. The linchpin in wide-scale deployment will be people wanting easy solutions. Weave is certainly going to push the adoption wave; it will be interesting to see how integration solution providers and OEMs respond.

 

The Real Estate Services Shopping Spree

— June 12, 2015

You would be forgiven for thinking that CBRE stands for Can’t Buy Rapidly Enough. The company (which actually stands for Coldwell Banker Richard Ellis as a result of an interesting history of spinoffs, mergers, and acquisitions) is the world’s largest commercial real estate service and has been on a recent acquisition binge. In March, CBRE announced a definitive agreement to acquire the Global Workplace Solutions business that Johnson Controls, Inc. announced it would divest last year. Two weeks later, CBRE announced the purchase of Environmental Systems, Inc. (ESI), an energy management and systems integration provider.

Global Workplace Solutions offers services that help companies operate facilities more efficiently, optimizing real estate performance and employee productivity, particularly in the industrial, life sciences, and technology sectors. These services include everything from site selection and design, planning, and construction management to standardizing maintenance procedures and performing inventory management.

ESI, on the other hand, designs, installs, manages, and supports integrated building automation systems and building energy management systems. In 2012, ESI was selected by IBM to manage the energy use of the 50 largest federal government buildings, linking the automation systems of the buildings together on a cloud-based platform to provide enterprise-level management.

The Complete Package

Both acquisitions highlight how providing a complete portfolio of services for corporate clients is becoming increasingly important for CBRE and the commercial real estate service industry as a whole. With growing demand for green-certified commercial office space, as well as increasing awareness of the benefits of energy efficiency in reducing operating expenses, commercial real estate service providers are moving to expand their capabilities with clients. Indeed, DTZ and CoreNet Global announced a partnership that incorporates CoreNet Global’s benchmarking service into DTZ’s commercial real estate services portfolio.

Real estate services companies have historically played a less central role in energy efficiency decision-making, energy management, and energy benchmarking than other infrastructure-focused players such as energy service companies (ESCOs) and HVAC contractors. But, that seems to be changing, as corporate clients are beginning to view energy information to be as important as the other information typically provided by real estate service companies. Though CBRE’s shopping spree may be over for now, we will likely see more acquisitions by real estate services companies to fill out their service portfolios.

 

Green House Gas Emissions and HVAC

— June 9, 2015

The scientific consensus around climate change is that greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted by human activities are creating a very serious problem. As a result, most major global regions have adopted targets for reduction of GHG emissions, notably carbon dioxide (CO2). The largest source of CO2 emissions comes from the burning of fossil fuels for generating electricity, powering vehicles, and providing heat. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment plays a large role in CO2 emissions, as it accounts for roughly 40% of total building energy consumption.

Thus, increasing the efficiency of HVAC equipment is a clear way to address GHG emissions. But, it’s not the only way HVAC equipment can help. Indeed, in a recent report, the World Resources Institute points out that non-energy and non-CO2 emissions account for 22% of all U.S. GHG emissions and are expected to rise. The report goes on to recommend the reduction of hydroflourocarbons (HFCs), which are used as refrigerants in HVAC equipment. However, when it comes to HVAC, what HFCs should be replaced by is not entirely clear.

Engineering Requirements

Within an HVAC system, refrigerant needs to be evaporated, condensed, and be compressed in such a way that the system can provide cool air. As a result, the band of temperature and pressure in which refrigerant changes phase between liquid and gas is narrow. Within a building, even the best HVAC systems may leak at some point in their lifetime. So, refrigerant needs to be non-toxic and non-flammable to keep building occupants safe. These requirements were met by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). However, the proliferation of these refrigerants introduced a new problem: ozone depletion. While HFCs have solved the problem of ozone depletion, they are a GHG that traps heat in the atmosphere, contributing to climate change. The next generation of refrigerant needs to solve all of these problems.

So far, finding one refrigerant that is functional, safe, and doesn’t have severe impacts on the environment has been difficult. Potential candidates that have a lower the global warming potential than HFCs include R-32, which is mildly flammable, and CO2, which doesn’t fully change phase. Both have been commercialized. R-32 has been available in Japan since 2012. CO2 is being used as a standalone refrigerant in Europe and has recently been deployed in the United States. While challenges still remain, the development of these refrigerants presents the promise of reduced GHG emissions.

 

The Information Reality behind the Intelligent Building

— June 9, 2015

Big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) are the buzz when it comes to intelligent buildings. A slew of vendors are tagging their solutions and coming to market with a message of cost-effective intelligence that will redefine how we live and work in buildings.  But are we ready?

In mid-May, I attended Haystack Connect, an event that brought together a vibrant vendor community tackling the reality of the development of the intelligent building.  The panels and conversations circled on a vision for open-source data modelling via Project Haystack. According to Project Haystack’s website, the project is an open source initiative to streamline working with data from the IoT and to standardize semantic data models and web services with the goal of making it easier to unlock value from the vast quantity of data being generated by the smart devices that permeate our homes, buildings, factories, and cities. The applications the project focuses on include automation, control, energy, HVAC, lighting, and other environmental systems.

Two lessons learned: First off, big data is a marketing tagline, but building owners want to know what it does for them. Second, the IoT can generate a whole lot of information, but the key is accuracy and action.

Big Data: More Isn’t Necessarily Better

The demand for intelligence is ubiquitous, from smartphones to smart watches, and the notion of data-driven decision-making is helping to accelerate customer demand for smart buildings. Getting the data from large existing buildings and making sense of what it means across an enterprise is no small feat. As one speaker put it, “This problem is not the domain of the data scientist.”  In other words, there is building technology and engineering expertise that has to be a part of the equation. In the Project Haystack world, this is about cleaning and processing system information with consistent approaches via tags that speak the same language. Without common naming, analytics can hit a wall.

The Promise of Data Granularity

The trajectory for device connectivity is impressive, and underlying the evolution in technology adoption is the maturation of cost-effective tools that make actionable building intelligence accessible to an ever-growing audience.  Wireless sensors and controllers can not only add granularity to the assessment of building performance, but also open the door to smaller facilities that have been out of reach for the legacy building controls industry.  The exposure of new applications to a wider audience is a critical step in the process of market maturation for smart buildings. As these solutions become adopted across customer segments, market awareness and business value will only increase.

 

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