Navigant Research Blog

Open Source Opens Doors for Building Automation

— October 23, 2014

Earlier this month, ARM launched a free operating system to drive the uptake of Internet of Things (IoT) devices.  The announcement reflects the growing trend toward open-source protocols across many technology fields.  The building automation space is no exception.

Several efforts exist to develop open-source platforms for various aspects of building automation.  Traditionally, controls communications for building automation systems (BASs) have been based on proprietary languages and protocols that were developed by individual companies and only compatible with certain software or hardware solutions.  Demand for interoperability from building owners and operators has begun to drive the development of open protocols for BASs.  Open protocols provide customers greater flexibility to select equipment from a number of vendors as well as other benefits, including higher robustness, lower cost, and the opportunity for more innovation and collaboration.

First Steps

There are three main efforts behind the drive toward open-source protocols in buildings: Project Haystack, Open BAS, and ASHRAE’s RP 1455.

Project Haystack is an initiative to streamline the process of working with data from the IoT.  Founded in 2011 by a group of member companies, including Airmaster, J2 Innovations, Lynxspring, Siemens, SkyFoundry, WattStopper, and Yardi, Project Haystack became a non-profit organization in July 2014.  With more than 500 members today, Project Haystack is involved in creating a library of naming conventions for items on a BAS.

The goal of Open BAS is to help facilitate the programming of systems in medium-sized commercial buildings (i.e., less than 50,000 square feet).  The Open BAS project is being run by an Information Technology for Energy (I4Energy) team of experts and innovators striving to find IT solutions for global energy issues.  The primary goal of the Open BAS project is to develop, refine, and formalize an open-source, user-friendly software platform that will bring energy efficiency to smaller commercial buildings.

The Security Hurdle

Finally, ASHRAE’s Research Project (RP) 1455 aims to provide a library of control sequences that integrators can use directly with HVAC equipment.  One goal is to establish more standardized control sequences for design engineers and controls contractors.  The 1455 project will specify best-in-class sequences for ASHRAE-compliant air systems in high-performance buildings.

Although these open protocol projects are good first steps, they have not yet provided interoperability to the extent that they promise.  As building owners and operators continue to demand greater interoperability and more flexibility with protocols, additional efforts to open up the programming of devices and allow deeper access will likely arise.  At the same time, security concerns highlighted by recent high-profile hacking attacks could limit the spread of open-source protocols.

 

Wireless Bulbs Offer Connected Light Controls

— October 20, 2014

Homeowners around the world have begun to transition from incandescent and compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) to more efficient and higher quality light-emitting diodes (LEDs).  Navigant Research’s report, Residential Energy Efficient Lighting and Lighting Controls, forecasts that LED sales for residential applications will increase at a compound annual growth rate of 17.6% through 2023.  Within this wholesale shift of lamp types, however, is another trend with far-reaching implications.

More and more  LED light bulbs are being sold with integrated wireless connectivity.  Instead of being controlled with simple switches, or even physical dimmers, these bulbs connect to the Internet, often through the homeowner’s Wi-Fi network, and can then be controlled through applications on a computer or smartphone.

This capability may seem extravagant , but the trend is picking up steam surprisingly quickly.  One of the first entrants to the category of wireless light bulbs was the Philips Hue, launched in October 2012.  Since then, nearly all of the large lighting companies have launched products in this category, including OSRAM, GE, Samsung, and LG.  In total, 18 different wireless light bulb products are available from 16 different manufacturers, including Greenwave Systems, Leedarson, LIFX Labs, Belkin, Fujikom, Whirlpool, and others.

Mood Lighting

These products come with a large range of features.  All are capable of dimming, while only some are able to change color (Philips, LIFX Labs, OSRAM, Tabu, Fujikom, and Environmental Lights).  Through various software applications, the lighting can be modified based on the time of day, weather conditions, or any other user preferences.  Lighting can also be tied into other home systems, such as the Philips Hue’s ability to connect with the Nest Protect smoke detector and flash red lights when either smoke or carbon monoxide are detected.  The Hue even allows lighting to be modified based on programmed sequences as an audio book is being read to provide a fully immersive scene for the listener.

Wireless bulbs come with a significant price premium over their non-connected counterparts.  While outlets such as The Home Depot have begun selling standard A-type LED bulbs for under $10, wireless bulbs are priced between $30 and $60 apiece.  As this premium comes down, and as more users become interested in the range of possibilities made available through connected lighting, adoption is expected to increase rapidly.

 

Automation Gives Manufacturers an Energy Boost

— October 17, 2014

According to the U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index, a measure developed by financial research firm Markit, manufacturing activity in the United States in September reached its highest point in more than 4 years.  Factory employment, though still well below pre-2008 levels, reached its highest level since March 2012.

U.S. manufacturers are getting a boost from low energy costs, driven primarily by the bonanza of low-cost natural gas (and, to a lesser extent, by distributed renewables, often onsite at plants).  But what’s going on inside U.S. plants is equally important.  Increased energy efficiency, enabled by a revolution in process automation technology, is also helping U.S. manufacturers compete with manufacturers that enjoy low-cost labor in developing countries, particularly China.

Excess No Longer Success

Since peaking around 1999, the primary energy use in the U.S. manufacturing sector has declined steadily, according to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, from about 35 quadrillion BTUs annually to less than 31 quads.  Energy intensity – the BTUs used per dollar value of shipments – has declined even more dramatically.

The shift is coming as a shock to old-line factory managers unused to calculating energy as a key metric of efficiency and productivity.  “No one ever got fired for purchasing a pump or a machine that’s too big for the job,” said Fred Discenzo, manager of R&D at Rockwell Automation, at a recent energy management conference in Akron, Ohio.  In manufacturing, “excess capacity has always been the safe option.”

Rockwell is among an emerging segment of technology vendors that is trying to change that, through what it calls “the connected enterprise.”  What that means is connecting the factory floor to the C-suite with far greater visibility and immediacy than before.  Another name for this change might be “extreme granularity.”  In the near future, energy use will be measured not at the factory or line or machine level, but at the individual process level, per unit of production: how much energy did it take to make this widget or valve or bag of ice, and where in the process can that energy use be optimized?

The Next Revolution

Advances in factory-floor networks, wireless sensors, virtualization, and monitoring equipment are enabling these improvements in manufacturing efficiency, energy conservation, and quality control.  These twinned revolutions – cleaner, cheaper, more distributed energy coming into the plant and sophisticated automation technology reducing energy intensity inside the plant – will result in changes that have far-reaching implications for the manufacturing sector, and for the economy.  “The new era of manufacturing will be marked by highly agile, networked enterprises that use information and analytics as skillfully as they employ talent and machinery to deliver products and services to diverse global markets,” concluded a 2012 McKinsey study entitled Manufacturing the Future.

At 32% of total energy consumption, industry uses more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy.  Manufacturers that adapt to the new realities of energy, by changing the ways in which they source and use electricity, will be more competitive on the global stage – and could help usher in the new economic upswing that politicians and analysts have been dreaming of for years.

 

Building Automation Shifts to Integrated Controls

— October 12, 2014

Building automation system (BAS) controls have long acted as a cash cow for vendors.  Historically, they were built on closed, proprietary communications protocols, virtually guaranteeing steady revenue from future maintenance and upgrades.  Now, though, customers are migrating to control systems with open protocols, such as BACnet and LonWorks, to gain greater flexibility and interoperability.  The emergence of these standards is changing the landscape of building controls.

The shift to open protocols largely benefits building owners (and has unsurprisingly been driven by the demand of building owners).  Competition is increased, as all vendors are on equal footing, which drives down prices.  Naturally, controls vendors are now exploring alternatives to gain a competitive advantage and regain steady revenue.  One emerging strategy is integrating more intelligence and more controls into HVAC equipment.  Even though more vendors can compete with open systems, the more intelligence that is shipped with HVAC equipment, the less there is available for controls companies to install, thereby protecting revenue from the increased competition.

Rapid Adaptation

Johnson Controls seems to be adapting to the changing environment rapidly.  The company made two important announcements in September.  First, it is reorganizing its building efficiency business to separate the North America branch from the global products business.  This will enable the company to focus on high-margin HVAC product lines, notably air distribution and ventilation solutions and variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems.  The second announcement signaled plans to divest Johnson Controls’ Global Workplace Solutions business.

As I noted after Johnson Controls’ acquisition of Air Distribution Technologies, the move was not about products but about controls.  Johnson Controls’ joint venture with Hitachi to provide VRF systems follows the same strategy.  VRF systems represent lower potential revenue for controls suppliers because controls are typically provided by the equipment manufacturer.  Moreover, because VRF systems use refrigerant as the heat transfer medium instead of air, the need for complex air-side control of supply air temperature and humidity is obviated.  By shifting its focus to HVAC products, Johnson Controls is ensuring that its controls stay relevant.

 

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