Navigant Research Blog

California’s Investments Pay Off in PEVs

— June 3, 2015

Analysis of the penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) per capita reveals that, to the surprise of no one, California is far ahead of the rest of the United States. Based on data from Navigant Research’s recently published Electric Vehicle Geographic Forecasts report, 7 of the 20 areas with the most PEVs on the road in 2015 are in the state.

As show in the below table, California’s seven metropolitan statistical areas are near the top of the list for PEVs sold per 100,000 residents. California’s route to success has included substantial investments in PEVs and EV charging infrastructure through incentives, project grants from the California Energy Commission and other state institutions, and by providing PEV access to HOV lanes. However, the coveted HOV stickers are nearly gone, so it would not be surprising if PEV sales in the Golden State slow unless new stickers are made available.

PEVs on the Road per 100,000 Residents

John blog table, june 2(Sources: Navigant Research, U.S. Census Bureau)

The regions on this list have many things in common that make owning a PEV favorable, including demographics like age and higher average incomes that lean toward PEV ownership. All of the states wherein these regions lie have some form of incentive for buying or driving an EV or for purchasing a charging station, often in the form of tax credits or the ability to drive in HOV lanes. Also, nearly all of the areas on the list were recipients of charging infrastructure funded by the Department of Energy’s EV Project and ChargePoint America projects, which deployed thousands of Level 1-2 and direct current (DC) fast charging stations between 2010 and 2013. The exceptions that were able to also create demand in PEVs are Honolulu, Denver, and Miami, although each area has received some federal funding for EV programs.

Investments in public EV charging infrastructure by federal or state agencies (or increasingly utilities) have resulted in greater PEV awareness by the general public, as well as increased PEV sales as potential buyers feel greater confidence knowing that they can charge at familiar spots around town. Conversely, states without investments in EV charging infrastructure have seen much less PEV penetration.

 

 

California Drought Implications for Electric T&D Becoming Clearer

— June 2, 2015

The implications of climate change and the 4-year California drought are just beginning to become clear. The snowpack in the Sierras, where reservoirs and dams ultimately feed the canal system that delivers water to the Bay Area, the Central Valley, and Southern California, is at an all-time low. While strict water rationing is mandatory for some residential and commercial consumers in many parts of the state, there are other forces at play. Some are laudable, and some are not.

On one hand, many city and municipal water districts are offering new rebate programs and incentives to remove lawns that require watering and replace them with xeriscape landscapes that require little if any water. On the other hand, the agricultural economy in California’s Central Valley needs water for almonds, pistachios, and a host of other products, and the large farms are reportedly pumping down the aquifers to support their business.

Thinking Long Term

Prolonged drought could also have major effects on the electric transmission and distribution (T&D) system, as well as on the water delivery system across California.

  • The major water agencies, including the Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) managing the canal system between Northern and Southern California, have for many years been not only a major end-use consumer, but also a demand response resource for the California Independent System Operator (CAISO).  If the volume of water moving south through the Central Valley and over the mountains into the Los Angeles basin decreases substantially, the loss of demand response resources during peak demand conditions could be substantial.
  • With limited snowpack, major California reservoirs are now at record low levels and have limited, if any, hydropower capacity. Innovative pumped water storage projects like Pacific Gas and Electric’s (PG&E’s) Helms System, which uses off-peak Diablo Canyon nuclear power to pump water up for day-time generation use, will be at risk.
  • Recent reports in media have suggested that many locations in California’s Central Valley are sinking as a result of ongoing water pumping from the underground aquifers by all types of commercial and agricultural businesses. Not only are residential, commercial, and agricultural wells going dry, but the land itself is subsiding. This has tremendous implications for California’s Peripheral Canal system and other longstanding canals that transport water north to south through the central valley. As subsidence occurs, it is entirely possible that cement canals will fracture, and major leaks will occur, further exacerbating the water loss problem.

As in many states, the electric transmission infrastructure in California is aging. It’s clear that California’s drought will have a significant effect on the electric power market as well, degrading demand response resources, electric demand for water pumping, and hydropower resources.

 

The Breadbasket Running Dry

— May 22, 2015

NASA scientists recently predicted that California has just 1 year of water left to the catastrophic tune of a million Facebook users simultaneously hitting the Share button. California’s water problems are not entirely self-inflicted, coming in the middle of what is reportedly the worst drought in 1,200 years. However, some of these problems are caused by poor water management.

California’s water laws dedicate around 40% of total water to farming and agriculture—about 80% of what isn’t strictly devoted to maintaining wildlife and the environment. Farming requires a lot of water, and California water law does not improve the situation. There is a huge incentive for farmers to waste water, meaning the so-called breadbasket of America can’t sustainably keep producing the same crops it currently does. California, if it were a country, would have the eighth largest economy in the world, so shutting down the pipes is not exactly an option.

Technology to the Rescue

So, what is being done to keep lawns green in The Golden State? Water appliance standards have been enacted, which are projected to save more than 100 billion gallons per year. But even massive usage restrictions won’t be enough to keep California going. William Shatner has proposed a $30 billion Kickstarter campaign for a pipeline that could transport water, above ground, from Seattle into Lake Mead. Orange County began recharging its drinking water aquifer with purified wastewater in 2008, but the catchphrase toilet-to-tap makes this a less-than-popular option in the public eye.

One solution that appears more glamorous is the desalination of seawater. In Carlsbad, California, construction is underway on a $1 billion desalination plant, the largest in the Western Hemisphere. Due to open in early 2016, this plant could provide up to 50 million gallons of fresh water each day, supplying around 112,000 households. Desalination is, however, massively expensive and can discharge large amounts of concentrated brine directly into the ocean. Permanent desalination plants (such as the one in Carlsbad) can only treat around 35%–50% of the water they bring in, according to Stanley Weiner, CEO of STW resources.

Salttech, a Norwegian company, recently demonstrated its DyVaR Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) water processing technology in Midland, Texas. This technology promises to recover up to 97% of the water processed, and discharge only solid salt and minerals, thus eliminating the problem of brine disposal to the ocean. Salttech has plans to begin an ocean desalination project on the coast of California. This technology also claims to be economical, reducing the cost of desalination from $1,850–$2,000 per acre-foot to $1,100–$1,350 per acre-foot, also according to Stanley Weiner. With the cost of desalinated water currently hovering around twice that of imported water, these technologies must make some major cost reductions before they can be widely adopted. Until then, California may have to start construction on Mr. Shatner’s pipeline.

 

In California, High-Speed Rail Takes Its Time Arriving

— August 5, 2014

California’s proposed high-speed rail (HSR) line between Los Angeles and San Francisco is stirring controversy – not surprisingly – for a $68 billion infrastructure project that will take until 2029 to complete.  The concerns over the project’s cost-to-benefit ratio cross party lines.  While California Republicans have lined up against Democratic Governor Jerry Brown’s proposal, so has his own lieutenant governor, Gavin Newsom.  The state successfully beat back a legal challenge to the project’s funding plan, but more legal challenges loom.

The HSR debate also ties into the broader question of whether the United States can accomplish big things anymore. Congress’ inability to find a serious, long-term solution to the dwindling Highway Trust Fund is just one example of this problem – one that also results in less money to support any state’s big idea.

Writing in support of the HSR, James Fallows of The Atlantic makes a key point: “Big infrastructure investments are usually under-valued and over-criticized while in the planning stage.”  One obvious comparison is Boston’s Big Dig. That was also enormously ambitious project with a huge price tag that took more than a decade to complete.  It had massive cost overruns, becoming the subject of constant complaints in Massachusetts.  Today, visiting Boston since the Big Dig’s completion, it’s clear why the expense and hassle was worth it.  The city was knit back together after having been split apart by a major road running through its heart.  In place of the old elevated highway is a greenway that invites pedestrians and connects with bike-sharing stations.

Easier Than Flying

It’s worth noting that the Big Dig was a huge infrastructure project designed to undo the effects of another ambitious infrastructure project, one that had unforeseen, and disastrous, consequences.  Moreover, the Big Dig plan was based on known demand, since it essentially took traffic from above ground and moved it into tunnels.  This central purpose removed much of the uncertainty about new infrastructure projects that can keep politicians and planners up at night.

That uncertainty lies at the heart of the debate over high-speed rail. A major new passenger rail project, in a country that has largely abandoned rail travel for cars and planes, is a leap of faith.  The most apt comparison for the California HSR is Amtrak’s Boston-New York-Washington corridor.  In 2012, Amtrak reported that it had captured 75% of commercial passenger travel between New York and Washington, D.C.  The success of the train is not due to its being cheaper – tickets can be as much as $145 one way – but more to the convenience and ease of trains compared to air travel.

HSR Plus Autonomous Vehicles

A key factor in that convenience is that, unlike airlines, the trains deposit passengers into the downtown of each city and connect to local transit services. This multimodal connectivity will be key to the success of the California HSR, whether it means connecting to public transit or to nearby carsharing services like City CarShare and DriveNow in downtown San Francisco.

The rise of autonomous vehicles is frequently cited by key opponents as evidence that the HSR is a 20th century idea whose time has passed.  While Navigant Research’s 2014 Autonomous Vehicles report suggests that long-distance, inter-city travel is a possible model for self-driving cars, it projects they’re most likely to be used for passenger travel in carsharing services as well as in fleets as an alternative to taxis for local travel within the city.  In this scenario, autonomous vehicles will actually support the high-speed rail line by making carsharing easier and ubiquitous in urban centers while the HSR meets city-to-city travel needs.

 

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