Navigant Research Blog

A New Culture for Carsharing

— February 8, 2017

Carsharing continues to make the transition from a startup or non-profit culture to a corporate culture. More and more large companies are entering the space and acquiring smaller carshare services, and automaker services are adding high end vehicles to the quirky two-seaters. But the bigger news may be that carsharing is starting to show traction outside its traditional markets of highly developed car cultures—namely North America, Western Europe, and Japan.

A spate of recent announcements from automakers reflects continuing interest in on demand mobility services—not just carsharing, but also ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft. The latest automakers to announce carsharing expansions are AB Volvo, the PSA Group, and Daimler AG. Volvo has been in the carsharing business since the late 1990s through Swedish carshare service Sunfleet. In January, the automaker announced it would create a business unit for global carsharing based on the Sunfleet service.

The PSA Group will be supplying EVs for a new carsharing service in Paris, targeting professionals as its primary customers. This mainly seems to entail offering larger vehicles such as the Peugeot Partner and Citroën Berlingo, both small panel vans. Daimler is also making a play for carshare users who want larger vehicles than the tiny smart fortwo vehicle that has made up its car2go fleet to date. But Daimler is going more upscale than panel vans. The company announced that it would begin incorporating Mercedes Benz sedans and SUVs into its car2go fleets in seven US cities.

Experimental Phase

These announcements reflect the wide range of approaches to carsharing that automakers are pursuing. Although automakers are demonstrating real interest in carsharing, they are still largely in an experimental phase, trying out different business models to see what gains traction and what best supports their respective brands. While some will likely find that the service does not suit their customer base or business strategy, the trend of establishing a separate business unit for shared mobility suggests that automakers are taking the carsharing market seriously.

Automakers that see shared mobility as a first application for automated vehicles will certainly continue to pursue these services. Small, quirky startup carshare companies may find it difficult to compete in that environment. It is likely that some small carshare companies will be acquired by automakers looking to establish a beachhead for carsharing in new markets. Note that consolidation is also happening through other big players in the shared mobility space, including Europcar. Through mobility startup Ubeequo, Europcar recently acquired a Milan carshare service called GuidaMi.

But it is even more interesting to see carsharing starting to break through in new geographic regions such as Thailand, India, the United Arab Emirates, and Kazakhstan. These are not necessarily locations that would seem obvious for carsharing—in some cases due to a lack of public transit, which is seen as a supporting pillar to a shared mobility environment. Perhaps most significantly, China is seeing a surge in on demand mobility services, as the government has begun encouraging shared mobility as one of many tools to combat congestion and pollution problems. These new markets have the potential to help the carshare market continue to grow as the mature markets become saturated.

 

Smart Cities Week Highlights the Market’s Transition from Technology to People

— October 6, 2016

CarsharingA key theme reiterated at Smart Cities Week in Washington, DC was the recent evolution of the smart cities market to focus prospective projects more on people and how they would be affected by new technology, rather than the technology itself. As stated in one of my previous blogs, one of the keys to Columbus, Ohio winning the US Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) Smart City Challenge and beating out the better-known technology centers of San Francisco, Austin, and Denver was the city’s ability to demonstrate that its plan would result in increasing poor residents’ access to new transportation options.

Keynote speakers at the conference also discussed the White House’s recent announcement that it will be providing an additional $80 million for smart city projects in response to the enormous interest that the DOT Smart City Challenge received. The majority of the new funding is expected to go toward the National Science Foundation.

Transportation and Economic Opportunity

Transportation as a connection to social inclusion was another key focus area of Smart Cities Week. US Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx stated, “We have an opportunity … This is the first time in the history of our nation that we have a chance to build a transportation ecosystem that isn’t weighed down by exclusions, but is built on inclusion.” Again using Columbus as an example, the city is developing an app that would enable residents to pay for a multitude of transportation options (i.e., public transit, ride-hailing, and carsharing) through universal fare cards, with kiosks being set up in poorer communities to allow residents without smartphones or bank accounts to still have access to mobility services. Connecting to the socioeconomic challenges of cities is an important element in gaining citizen support for smart city programs.

City Infrastructure Under Transformation

As cities around the world continue to reach a boiling point in terms of traffic congestion and a lack of parking availability, smart city solutions have the potential to completely transform city infrastructure, improving quality of life and increasing the efficiency of cities. Low-cost autonomous ride-hailing programs could remove much of the need for excessive personal vehicles on the road and alleviate ubiquitous on-street parking. New spaces for walking and bicycling would be opened up, transforming the city into a more inclusive space, with low-cost transportation options for all residents.

 

Mobility Services Target Driving Less (or at Least More Efficiently)

— September 1, 2016

CarsharingThe problem of urban congestion includes both too many cars simultaneously on the road and too few places to park them. New mobility services from Ford and Lyft are using data analytics and last-mile ridesharing to solve these twin challenges.

Increasing urbanization (82% of people now live in urban areas in North America, according to the United Nations) is intensifying the pressure on city streets and roadways and encouraging more urban dwellers to forego owning a car because of the expense and hassle of finding a place to park. Realizing that vehicle sales to city residents may start to flatten, automakers (including Ford) are diversifying their revenue streams with mobility services.

The recently unveiled FordPass app enables any car owner to pre-book a parking space in garages in more than 160 cities. FordPass also includes phone access to humans to help customers get around in traffic or find other mobility options, and the company also opened its first FordHub mobility storefront in San Francisco. When you also consider the company’s FordPay payment service, it’s clear that the automaker isn’t afraid to borrow from a certain Cupertino company’s playbook. (What’s next, the iFordFone?)

Autonomous Future

Ford also continues to march toward releasing a fully autonomous vehicle. The automaker recently invested in lidar manufacturer Velodyne’s autonomous sensing technology. Ford also announced its intention to produce a fully autonomous car by 2021 for use in ridesharing services. Uber, Lyft, and many other companies see taking those pesky compensation-seeking drivers out of the equation as the future of ridesharing.

Navigant Research forecasts that annual mobility services revenue will reach $4.8 billion in 2020. Automakers will play a significant role in these services, which include carsharing and ridesharing services, congestion charging programs, EV charging services, intelligent traffic management, and smart parking systems.

Smart Urban Mobility End-User Services Revenue by Region, World Markets: 2015-2024

Mobility(Source: Navigant Research)

If an autonomous vehicle is electric, it would reduce urban emissions while also addressing the problem of limited parking. If used to get people to and from mass transit stations, ridesharing programs can reduce the overall vehicle miles traveled by removing trips into the city core. Such is the case in the Denver suburb of Centennial, where light rail customers can request a free Lyft ride if they live near the Dry Creek train station. While using tax dollars to put people in private cars may seem counterintuitive, if it increases the utilization of light rail, it can be viewed as a net positive in solving the last mile challenge and reduce the cost when compared to limited-use bus services. Employees who work for XOJET, which provides luxury rides above the clouds, can also now access Lyft to get to and from their hotels and airports while they are accommodating the jet-setter crowd.

 

Two and Four-Wheel EV Sharing Programs Growing Rapidly

— August 8, 2016

E-BikeConsumers around the world are increasingly searching for new products and services that will enable improved mobility in and around city centers. A key challenge for cities in the 21st century is how larger numbers of people can be incentivized to move away from personal cars for motorized transportation and toward cleaner mobility devices and services.

Shared EV programs reduce vehicle emissions and noise while simultaneously improving mobility in cities—something personal EV ownership cannot achieve on its own. As the EV industry continues to evolve and help address some of these concerns, vendors are experimenting with shared EV programs that utilize an array of vehicle types.

Increasing Interest from Automakers

In early August, BMW announced that it will be expanding its ReachNow carsharing program to cover Portland, Oregon after successfully deploying the service in Seattle, Washington in early 2016. The service attracted more than 13,000 members within its first month of operation. BMW temporarily matched Car2Go’s per-minute prices and eliminated its membership fee for increased competitiveness. The automaker uses a mix of vehicles for the program that includes MINI Coopers and the all-electric BMW i3.

Additionally, Nissan is collaborating with San Francisco-based electric scooter-share company Scoot Networks to deploy a fleet of 10 mobility concept cars (the Renault Twizy) in the Bay Area. Beginning August 2, new market entrant Green Commuter is launching a carshare and vanpool fleet in Los Angeles using entirely all-electric Tesla Model X SUVs.

E-PTWs Continue Broad Implementation

In the electric power two-wheel vehicle (e-PTW) market, Bosch is launching an electric scooter (e-scooter) sharing program in Berlin, Germany. The company is using 200 e-scooters from Taiwanese-based company Gogoro, which implemented a battery swapping network business model for its e-scooter deployment in Taipei. The battery swapping model from Gogoro is being adapted to be more of a traditional carshare model in Germany. E-scooter sharing services are expanding quickly across Europe, with iconic cities such as Paris, France and Barcelona, Spain having already implemented similar programs.

Globally, an increasing number of bicycle sharing programs have also been turning toward electric-powered technology as of late. Most recently, it was announced that the largest electric bicycle (e-bike) share program in North America (roughly 200 e-bikes) will be implemented in Baltimore, Maryland in the fall of 2016.

Whether it’s on two wheels or four, the plethora of new on-demand mobility programs sprouting up across the globe indicates that transportation is moving toward a future that is both shared and electric. Vendors looking to capitalize on this rapidly evolving business will need to offer high levels of vehicle accessibility, affordable hourly usage rates, and differentiating product options. For more information on electric mobility devices and their impact on cities, look out for Navigant Research’s upcoming Electric Mobility in Smart Cities report.

 

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