Navigant Research Blog

Is DER Taking Off in China?

— November 7, 2017

Last month, the Chinese Photovoltaic Industry Association announced that the country had installed a whopping 24.4 GW of new capacity in the first half of 2017. That China broke its previous year’s record once again makes the announcement news in itself. What is interesting, however, is not the final figure, but how China reached it.

In the first half of 2017, ground-mounted installations (installations without any onsite electricity demand) fell 16% to 17.3 GW, while distributed PV—mostly rooftop projects—almost tripled, reaching 7.1 GW in the same period. Of the 7.1 GW, 3.0 GW of distributed PV was installed in June 2017 alone. By the end of June, China had 102 GW of PV capacity installed, of which 83% was ground-mounted and 17.4 GW was distributed.

A highly attractive incentive program drove this growth. China’s distributed PV users (rooftop plants of up to 20 MW) can access a feed-in tariff premium for 2017 of ¥0.42/kWh ($0.06/kWh) on top of the electricity price for 15 years. In addition, some provinces offer further incentives. For example, Hebei provides ¥0.15/kWh ($0.02/kWh) for the first 3 years of the plant (effective in 2015). Jiangsu Province offers ¥0.50/kWh ($0.08/kWh) for 5 years, and the City of Shaoxing gives an additional ¥1.00/kWh ($0.16/kWh).

The national incentive was left at the same level for the last 4 years while PV module prices fell about 40%, so distributed PV became economically attractive. In addition, late in 2016, China’s National Energy Administration proposed a 28%-52% cut to the distributed PV tariff, depending on the region where the system is installed. This was changed in the latest draft, which now proposes a national tariff of ¥0.30 ($0.05) per kWh on top of the electricity price that would take effect in January 2018.

The expected drop in the incentives created a rush to install distributed PV in 2017, but there are other factors in favor of the massive growth. Curtailment is a major issue faced by Chinese PV installations, and it has pushed the country to ban new ground-mounted installations in the provinces that have the most issues—like Xinjiang and Gansu, where 26% and 22% of all the potential generation is lost (at a cost to the system owner) due to curtailment, respectively. A key advantage of distributed PV installations over ground-mounted installations is the offtaker of the electricity produced onsite, as it limits the risk of curtailment.

Opportunities Beyond PV

Other distributed energy resources (DER) technologies are also poised to gain some ground, thanks to the deployment of distributed PV. In March 2017, the National Energy Board issued a draft paper with “guidelines for the promotion of energy storage technology and industry development,” creating some momentum for the country’s storage market. The local PV companies Trina Solar and Xie Xin have also shown interest in this market and have started to invest in storage to complement their product portfolios. China’s vehicle manufacturer BYD also has a long track record producing battery cells and recently launched energy storage systems for residential and commercial applications.

China’s Competitive DER Industry

The development of DER in China could easily reverberate in the rest of the world. Chinese PV OEMs already lead the world in production and are taking an important role in technology innovation in the renewable sector. If the large Chinese inverter and battery players like Huawei, Sungrow, and BYD create innovative DER products for their domestic market that can be adapted to the North American and European markets, this will be difficult to answer. Despite the import tariff, Asian-made PV modules have conquered the market. However, giving Chinese companies some control over energy assets might be too much for Western governments. Huawei, for example, has been blocked from selling to the US telecom industry. But one thing is certain: we can bet the Chinese player will try.

 

The Energy Cloud by the Numbers: Supergrids Go Mainstream

— February 24, 2017

A common misconception around the rise of distributed energy resources (DER) and the Energy Cloud is that investment and innovation in the power sector is focused almost exclusively across the grid edge. While the grid’s center of gravity is shifting downstream, utility-scale generation and bulk transmission remain a key buttress for the grid in the midst of a historic transformation.

The global high voltage transmission network connecting centralized generation sources to the distribution grid is estimated to stretch across 3.5 million km. To put this in context, there is enough high voltage infrastructure deployed globally to wrap around the earth 75 times. Although already extensive, the International Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that an additional $7.2 trillion investment is needed for transmission and distribution (T&D) grids through 2030—40% of which is just to replace existing infrastructure.

High voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines, which function as arteries that move large amounts of electricity above and separate from the existing alternating current (AC) grid, are a key focus of this investment. Currently, there is more than 200 GW of HVDC capacity deployed globally.

According to Navigant Research’s Supergrids report, global investment in HVDC infrastructure is expected to increase from $8.3 billion annually in 2016 to $10.2 billion by the end of 2025. An estimated 65 supergrid projects heavily leveraging HVDC are in development or planned around the world. One such project, dubbed the Asia Super Grid, was born out of a memorandum of understanding among Japan, China, South Korea, and Russia in 2011.

Why So Much Fuss Over Expensive Hardware?

Since large-scale renewable energy projects tend to be built in remote areas where resource anomalies exist (such as wind in remote plains, solar in desert regions with high insolation, and geothermal power tapping underground steam located near centers of volcanic activity), bulk transmission is necessary to deliver generated electricity to large population centers, sometimes located thousands of miles away. The largest pools of renewable energy tend to be the farthest from human population centers; supergrids connect these areas of high supply to areas of high demand.

As discussed in the Navigating the Energy Transformation white paper, the emergence of the Energy Cloud will mean an expansion of traditional grid boundaries to integrate local networks of DER—microgrids, virtual power plants (VPPs), and others—as well as expand internationally to tap far-flung pools of renewable resources.

The Expansion of Traditional Grid Boundaries in the Energy Cloud

Source: Navigant Research

China is currently the world leader in the development and deployment of HVDC infrastructure. This is partly out of necessity; not only is China playing catchup with domestic demand for electricity, but the majority of its population of 1.3 billion lives in the east of the country, 2,000 km or more from its most concentrated energy resources. According to an Economist analysis, three-quarters of China’s coal is in the far north and northwest of the country, for example. Meanwhile, four-fifths of its hydroelectric power is in the southwest.

China’s state-owned utility, State Grid, is halfway through its 10-year plan to spend $88 billion on HVDC lines between 2009 and 2020. As investments continue, we expect the prospect of a global grid to come more sharply into focus—though obstacles related to cost, standards harmonization, consensus around rules of free trade of electricity, and geopolitical hurdles will first need to be more firmly settled.

 

China Exploring New Avenues for Energy Storage in 2017

— February 8, 2017

BatteriesLooking back on 2016, the energy storage industry in China has had its positives and its negatives. Navigant Research believes that energy storage increasingly is valued based on the services that a system provides. Overall, China is an attractive market for energy storage, particularly lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. Market activity in 2016 included increased sales of EVs throughout the country, electricity market reforms to spur grid-tied storage resources, and a multimillion-dollar increase in investment of national battery companies. The country is embracing a cleaner, more connected future going into 2017.

Electric Vehicles

Long projected to be the largest global EV producer and market (despite reports of inflated plug-in EV sales figures being used to garner government subsidies), policies that promote the development of alternative fuel vehicles drive EV sales in China. The central government began giving out subsidies for EVs in 2013, and the value of subsidies has decreased annually since then. The 2016-2020 Notice on the Financial Support Policy for the Promotion of New Energy Vehicles from the country’s Ministry of Finance announced that, compared to the 2016 level of subsidy, the 2017-2018 level and the 2019-2020 level will be reduced by 20% and 40%, respectively. In addition to the subsidy, the central government has also waived the vehicle sales tax. Additional subsidies in China can be found predominantly at city governments. For example, Beijing and Shenzhen allow a 1:1 matching subsidy for consumers, effectively doubling the national EV purchase subsidy.

On the grid-tied storage front, Navigant Research anticipates that China will be the single largest country market for energy storage, reaching 5.5 GW of new capacity by 2025 across the utility-scale market alone. Though the country’s electricity market has long been government-run, recent market reforms have allowed non-state wholesale power producers to enter the market, opening up opportunities for independent power producers (IPPs) to provide ancillary services by way of energy storage resources. Compounded with the big push for new variable generation resources within China, storage greatly improves the business case for renewables by eliminating the need for new transmission and distribution resources.

Battery Manufacturers

Large battery manufacturers headquartered in China (such as BYD, CATL, Lishen, and Wanxiang A123) have deployed several systems in various EVs and stationary storage installations; these companies introduced several rounds of investment plans to further develop their respective technologies. In April 2016, China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology announced that any EVs applying for the Chinese government subsidy had to utilize a battery manufactured by a Chinese-owned company listed on the ministry’s so-called White List, effectively eliminating competition from other large global manufacturers like Panasonic and LG Chem. Chinese battery companies are also targeting other applications in foreign markets. For example, Neovoltaic, GCL Integrated Storage, and Pylontech have launched residential solar plus storage solutions ranging from 2.5 kWh to 8 kWh for residential customers in Australian, German, and American markets. Several other Chinese Li-ion battery providers are looking to establish partnerships with other systems integrators to further expand into other attractive storage markets.

The battery energy storage industry in China goes where the government steers it. Though the effect of policy and demand-side incentives varies by territory, the country seems to have a clear plan on what role storage will play in its clean energy future. As the industry matures, customer needs and grid needs will evolve and allow for EVs and energy storage systems to penetrate new markets. It remains to be seen whether China’s aggressive clean energy adoption strategy will be successful in the long term.

 

China’s EV and EV Batteries Policy: An Update

— April 25, 2016

BatteriesWith some of the worst air pollution on the planet, China has been aggressively pushing for emissions reductions and sustainable development since the launch of its 12th Five-Year Plan. In March 2016, the 13th Five-Year Plan covering 2016 to 2020 was released. Some of the key goals include a 15% energy intensity reduction and an 18% carbon intensity reduction compared to 2015 levels. With air quality in the country being at such poor levels, the government is highly interested in new energy vehicles (NEVs)—referring to battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs)—to curb emissions.

Backed by government support, the Chinese EV market has made headlines in recent years. The country is on track to achieve its goal of putting 5 million electric passenger vehicles and buses on the road by 2020. Over 300,000 NEVs were sold in 2015, amounting to approximately 500,000 in cumulative deployment by the end of 2015. Plus, the government plans to increase the share of NEVs in government fleets from 30% to 50% in 2016.

New Stance on Subsidies

Although the Chinese EV market has made significant progress thanks to generous subsidies, the handouts have encouraged subsidy frauds as well. Finance Minister Lou Jiwei expressed concerns over the NEV industry’s heavy reliance on subsidies in January 2016. NEV development appears to be driven by policy incentives more than technological breakthroughs, to the extent that there has been a spate of media coverage about subsidy frauds in China in the last few months. For example, a company might assemble substandard NEVs and sell them to its own car rental company with the intent of receiving subsidies. The deficient NEVs are then left in parking lots and not put into actual use. Another common scheme is to sell license plates on the black market.

Consequently, the central government launched a fraud investigation and vowed to severely punish those involved in fraudulent schemes. Additionally, the government plans to end NEV subsidies after 2020 to encourage technological innovation. China plans to cut subsidies by 20% between 2017 and 2018 from 2016 levels and by 40% between 2019 and 2020, eventually leading to a phaseout after 2020.

Battery Technology Strategy

Chinese leaders are aware of the need to improve the country’s EV battery technology in order to stay competitive in the global NEV market. Therefore, the government’s decision to suspend subsidies for electric buses using nickel manganese cobalt (NMC) batteries is rather surprising. While most Chinese companies manufacture lithium iron phosphate (LFP) batteries, the global market prefers NMC or lithium manganese oxide (LMO) batteries for their superior performance and efficiency. Some Chinese manufacturers are making NMC batteries but have not yet mastered the technology yet—there were six reported cases of EVs with NMC batteries catching on fire last year.

This policy change is expected to affect NCM battery manufactures in China since subsidies can account for nearly 40% of the price of an NEV, and buses represent nearly half of the NEV market. In particular, South Korean battery manufacturers made major investments in new NMC battery production facilities in China. LG Chem formed a joint venture with two state-owned enterprises in August 2014 with plans to generate $1 billion in revenue by 2020. Samsung also formed a joint venture with Anqing Ring New Group and real estate investor Xian with plans to invest $600 million by 2020. Since subsidies will continue to be given for less-advanced LFP batteries, many Chinese battery manufactures will enjoy government support in the short run. However, China’s long-term battery technology strategy remains uncertain.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies, Utility Transformations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"China","path":"\/tag\/china","date":"12\/15\/2017"}