Navigant Research Blog

Toyota Commits to Active Safety Features

— September 18, 2014

If the world’s largest automaker gets its way, by the end of this decade, we can expect advanced active safety and semi-automated driving features to become as familiar as anti-lock brakes and stability control have in the past 10 years.

During an advanced safety systems seminar near Toyota’s North American technical center in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the automaker challenged its competitors when it committed to offering advanced active safety systems across its lineup by 2017.  Toyota also increased its commitment to advanced safety R&D by extending the initial 5-year mandate of the Collaborative Safety Research Center (CSRC) from 2016 through 2021 and adding $35 million in new funding.

At the same event, Simon Nagata, senior vice president of the Toyota Technical Center, announced an expansion of the scope of the CSRC, which was launched by company president Akio Toyoda in 2011.  Nagata described the program as unique in the industry because “all findings are openly shared in order to benefit people everywhere.”

CSRC research initially focused on three areas: driver distraction, active safety, and helping to protect the most vulnerable traffic populations, including children, teens, and seniors. Automated and connected vehicle technologies are now part of the CSRC scope of work. To date, CSRC has initiated or completed 34 projects with 17 universities and research hospitals.

Join the Crowd

Ford has drawn attention in recent years for offering a full suite of driver assist capabilities, including active park assist, blind spot information, lane departure warning and prevention, and adaptive cruise control on the high-volume Fusion midsize sedan.  Some of these features are even available on the smaller Focus and Escape.  Other manufacturers, including Nissan, Honda, and even Hyundai, have since added some of these features to mainstream products.  Toyota, on the other hand, has largely restricted these technologies to its premium Lexus brand.

“Many of these capabilities will be added to Toyota brand vehicles starting in 2015 and with the goal of becoming the first full-line manufacturer to offer these technologies across the entire lineup by 2017,” said Bill Fay, Toyota group vice president and general manager.  Fay didn’t provide details about exactly which vehicles will get what features.  However, the updated 2015 Camry sedan, announced in April at the New York Auto Show, will offer radar-based adaptive cruise control, blind spot monitoring, cross traffic alert, lane departure alert, and a pre-collision system.

Toyota’s increased emphasis on active safety and automated driving is likely to inspire both the competition and regulators who may well see this as an opportunity to begin mandating the technologies that are building blocks for autonomous vehicles, just as they did previously with stability control and rear cameras.  And it will provoke a wider discussion of how we incorporate automated vehicles into the transportation ecosystem.

 

Smoggy Skies Drive City Innovation

— September 16, 2014

The air pollution caused by rising vehicle numbers and coal-fired power plants in Chinese cities has been well documented.  But these issues are not limited to cities of the developing world.  In March, smog levels in Paris reached levels that forced the city government to limit vehicle access to the city and make public transportation free.  Subsequent analysis suggests that this drastic measure had a notable impact on air quality, if only temporarily.

Paris is not alone among European cities in suffering from deteriorating air quality.  London and other U.K. cities, for example, have been under the spotlight for failing to meet European Union (EU) standards on air quality.  A report in July suggested that Oxford Street in London was one of the most polluted roads in the word with regard to nitrogen dioxide (largely produced by diesel buses and cars), with levels 3 times the EU-recommended amount – and higher than Beijing.  London and some other U.K. cities are not expected to meet EU targets for air pollution reduction until 2030.

Fewer Vehicles, Cleaner Air

The World Health Organization estimates that outdoor air pollution causes 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide each year; this mortality rate is due to exposure to small particulate matter of 10 microns or less in diameter, which cause cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and cancers.  Of particular concern in cities are fine particulate matter below 2.5 microns, referred to as PM2.5, which can lodge deep within the lungs.  This life-threatening type of smog is created by burning vehicle fuel as well as other fuels such as coal and wood.

The need to address air pollution is becoming a significant driver for the adoption of electric vehicles in cities, restrictions on the worst polluting vehicles, and the introduction of technologies that can monitor and improve air quality.  Madrid, for example, is using parking fees to target the worst polluting vehicles, while also introducing an electric bike rental scheme.  Boston is piloting high-tech city benches that can collect information on air quality and provide solar-powered charging for electronic devices.  Other high-tech attempts to improve air quality have been less than successful: a project supported by the Mayor of London that used a form of glue to collect contaminants proved to be largely ineffective in capturing vehicle pollution.  More recently, the Mayor has suggested that diesel vehicles, responsible for much of London’s damaging air pollution, may face additional charges for driving in the capital under the city’s congestion charging scheme.

Looking East

In the future, western cities may look to China as a leader in air quality improvement.  In 2013, the Chinese government launched its Airborne Pollution Prevention and Control Action Plan, which will see it invest $277 billion in an attempt to reduce air pollution by up to 25% in selected provinces and cities (including the municipality of Beijing) by 2017 compared to 2012 levels.  Beijing alone is expected to invest around $160 billion.  Beijing is also working with IBM on a 10-year project called Green Horizon that will employ sensor technologies, big data analytics, weather modelling, and other advanced techniques to help the city monitor and address air pollution.  The project will also integrate renewable energy forecasting and industrial energy management.

In North America and Europe, air pollution is often associated with a previous age of industrialization, but the growing public awareness of the continuing threat to public health is accelerating policy and technology innovation.  Ultimately, air pollution in our cities needs to be addressed through a combination of transportation and energy policies and the general adoption of clean fuel vehicles and other clean technologies.

 

Fuel Cell Vehicles Set to Arrive – with Fueling Stations

— September 5, 2014

Heading into the 2015 launch of commercial fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) from Toyota and Honda (Hyundai’s is already out), California and Japan appear to be leading the race to build infrastructure.  In the past 12 months, the governments in California and Japan have each made a firm commitment to support extensive refueling networks.  Japan set a target of building 100 stations by March 2016.  California has committed to providing up to $20 million annually in support of a 100-station network.

Those timelines are aggressive given that, up to now, hydrogen stations have taken 18 months or more to build.  In California in particular, the timeline for building a hydrogen fueling site has been very lengthy, 24 months and even more.  This is one reason that the state has lost its leading position as a first market for FCVs.  A year ago, it looked like Europe was going to step up, with the United Kingdom announcing its own H2Mobility program to follow on the one that Germany established to develop and execute a hydrogen roadmap.  However, both of these programs are moving rather slowly.  By contrast, California secured a funding commitment from the state of up to $20 million per year in September 2013.  Now, the state is moving forward at a much faster pace.   In May, the California Energy Commission (CEC) announced awards for 28 stations, to be built by November 2015, for a total of around $46 million.

New Entrants

Of course, being first also means being a guinea pig for this market, which still faces a good deal of uncertainty in terms of potential demand.  I’ll be outlining FCVs sales prospects through 2023 in my upcoming report, 2014 Fuel Cell Annual Report.  Participants in the buildout of California’s first nine stations learned some lessons that are now being implemented.  One of the most critical differences is that the CEC is using its funding to provide support for operations and maintenance in addition to station construction.  This represents a tacit admission that the stations will be a cost center for owners and operators for the first years of the market.  The CEC awarded $300,000 to four current stations to support ongoing operations.

Another striking difference with the new 28 stations is that only 3 of the 28 awards are going directly to industrial gas companies (IGCs).  In place of IGCs, new entities have sprung up specifically to build and manage retail hydrogen fueling; these entities were given 23 awards.  Startup FirstElement Fuel received awards to build 19 stations.  The company was launched with funding support from Toyota and IGC Air Products but is open to working with any IGC that wants to use a third party to operate a retail station.  The company plans to become an operator of hydrogen fueling networks, similar to electric vehicle (EV) charging network operators.  FirstElement secures a retail gas station where there is real estate available to add a hydrogen pump and takes responsibility for the station once it’s up and running.  This removes risk from both the gas station owner and from the IGC providing the hydrogen.

Quite a bit of risk remains for the CEC in placing much of the responsibility for stations needed in 2015 on one company.  But the good news for the FCV market is that some early lessons learned are paying off in terms of new ways to tackle the problem of providing fuel to potential FCV drivers.

 

Automakers Add Gears for Better Fuel Efficiency

— September 3, 2014

Automakers are pursuing many options to improve the fuel efficiency of their cars and trucks.  Most recently, the emphasis has been on reducing weight by changing to less dense materials even though they’re more expensive.   There is also ongoing development work with electrification to recover and reuse kinetic energy.  The latest change to help manufacturers comply with tightening fuel economy targets worldwide is revamping the automatic transmission.

Historically, automatic transmissions were inherently less efficient than manual gearboxes, and convenience was the tradeoff for the loss of a few percentage points in fuel economy and acceleration. Some of the latest automatic gearboxes, though, are actually more efficient than a manual gearbox with a clutch.  Today, the desire to retain complete manual control over gear selection means, in some cases, slightly higher fuel consumption and longer 0 to 60 mph times.  However, a stick-shift generally still saves money off the new sticker price and in North America is sometimes regarded as an anti-theft device.

On Up to 10

From the late 1960s, three speeds was the standard automatic configuration, and it wasn’t until the early 1980s that overdrive and lock-up top gears were added to help improve the efficiency, leading to more four- and five-speed automatic gearboxes.  In 2002, gearbox technology began to get a lot more attention when BMW put the first 6-speed automatic into production, followed by Mercedes with its 7-speed in 2003 and Toyota with an 8-speed in 2007.  Recently there have been a number of transmission announcements:

  • GM is crediting its new 8-speed automatic for making the 2015 Corvette Stingray faster and more efficient.  More gears allows for a lower first gear ratio for better acceleration, as well as a higher final drive ratio to reduce engine speed at highway cruising speed.  The 8L90 transmission will also feature in GM’s range of pickup trucks and SUVs.  Careful packaging and internal design features means that the new gearbox fits the same space as the 6-speed 6L80 – even though it can handle higher torque and power in addition to weighing less.
  • ZF introduced its revised 8-speed transmission in the 2014 BMW 5 Series.  This second-generation 8HP gearbox (the first was introduced in 2009) offers revised gear ratios to take advantage of the latest engine efficiency improvements that deliver more torque at lower rpms.  Advanced torsional vibration dampers improve smoothness, and a new shifting design has reduced internal energy losses.  Other users of the 8HP for rear-wheel-drive cars are Audi, Jaguar Land Rover, and Chrysler.
  • Chrysler is building a 9-speed transmission under license from ZF.  It went into production at the end of 2013 in the Jeep Cherokee.  ZF also supplies the 9HP for the Range Rover Evoque.  Chrysler is planning to implement a version in its minivans and smaller front-wheel-drive cars, as well.  Although the wider ratios provide better fuel economy and acceleration, concerns have been raised about erratic shifting.  These are being addressed via a software update.
  • In September 2013, Mercedes launched its 9G-TRONIC transmission on the E 350 BlueTEC diesel saloon car.  Despite two additional gears and a higher maximum torque, the new automatic transmission requires no more installation space than its predecessor and is also lighter.  The torque converter housing is made of lightweight aluminum, while the transmission housing with plastic oil pan is made of an even lighter magnesium alloy.

Ford and GM have already announced that they are planning to develop a 10-speed gearbox together.  It seems that manufacturers have figured out how to get more ratios in the same space and, at the same time, reduce internal energy losses so that efficiency is higher while maintaining or improving performance.  The key is integration with the latest engine characteristics to optimize the driving experience.  This topic will be covered in more detail in our upcoming report on automotive fuel efficiency.

 

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