Navigant Research Blog

Smart Cities NYC ‘17 Themes Reveal an Evolving Market

— May 25, 2017

The revitalized Brooklyn Navy Yard brought together academia, non-profits, private industry, and government leaders from around the world for the Smart Cities NYC ’17 conference and expo. Deliberating the future intersection of technology and urban life, key themes over the 3-day conference included digital inclusion, citizen empowerment, and the potential for technology to increase resident access to essential city services. It was encouraging to see the emphasis on digital inclusion and accessibility displayed by leading suppliers and city officials.

Digital Inclusion and Accessibility

A good example of how digital inclusion is being approached was provided by Microsoft, along with its partners G3ict and World Enabled, with the launch of the Smart Cities for All Toolkit. The toolkit is designed to help city officials and urban planners make more inclusive and accessible smart cities, particularly for the more than 1 billion people with a disability around the world. Tools developed for cities include a guide for adopting information and communications technology (ICT) accessibility standards and a guide for ICT accessible procurement policies, among others. The Smart Cities for All initiative is also in the process of developing a Smart Cities Digital Inclusion Maturity Model that will help cities evaluate their progress toward their ICT accessibility and digital inclusion targets.

A desire for greater inclusivity could also be seen on the transportation side, with many cities discussing the possibilities offered by mobility as a service (MaaS) solutions. MaaS has the potential to broaden transport options and lowers costs for consumers, enabling residents to have better access to potential areas of employment or leisure. One of the common initiatives is the deployment of multimodal transportation planning apps. These solutions, as shown in Conduent’s MaaS apps in Denver, Los Angeles, and most recently Bengaluru, allow residents to choose between an array of public and private options (such as bus, train, rideshare, carshare, and bikeshare) and help inform users of the cheapest or fastest ways to travel. Eventually, cities will be able to offer incentives and discounts to riders for taking certain transport options, for example, to mitigate congestion.

Bridging the Digital Divide

The primary goal of the global smart cities movement is to utilize technology to improve the quality of life in cities. While concerns about security and privacy have been well-documented, less focus is given to the potential for smart cities to increase the divide between small and large cities, the wealthy and the poor, and the healthy and the sick. To ensure these divisions are reduced rather than worsened, smart city programs need to ensure all segments of the population reap the benefits digital technology can provide.

These themes from the conference, along with recent major projects announced in cities such as San Diego and Columbus, provide further evidence that the smart cities market is evolving from one-off pilot projects toward more holistic outcome-focused approaches that consider the needs of all city residents and communities.

 

San Diego Aims to Set the Pace for Smart City Networks

— April 21, 2017

The announcement by the City of San Diego that it will deploy over 3,000 smart sensors as part of an ambitious upgrade to its street lighting system provides evidence that we are on the cusp of a new phase for smart street lighting and city networks.

As part of an upgrade to 14,000 city lights, San Diego will deploy 3,200 of GE’s Current CityIQ sensor nodes to create a multi-application city Internet of Things (IoT) network. The intelligent nodes can support a range of applications, including gunshot detection, smart parking, air quality sensing, and vehicle and pedestrian monitoring. Deployment of the platform and fixtures is expected to begin in July and to be completed before the end of 2018. The upgrade is expected to save the city $2.4 million annually in energy costs.

Platform for Innovation

As well as supporting a number of smart city applications, San Diego is also looking at the network to provide a broader platform for innovation. According to David Graham, San Diego’s deputy chief operating officer, the goal is to allow the community “to put their hands on the heartbeat and nervous system of the city is our way of building a smart city app store.” Delivering on this vision will put San Diego at the leading edge of smart city innovations.

The project fits with broader trends in the smart city market. The benefits of LED lighting are now widely understood by cities and many also recognize the value of providing network connections to those lamp poles (even if local finances and politics can still be a barrier to actual adoption). There is strong evidence that smart street lighting is crossing the chasm to becoming a mainstream technology.

However, the use of street lighting networks as a multi-application platform for smart city development has yet to make that leap. Today, deploying and managing a connected street lighting network is challenging enough for many lighting and public works departments. They need to ensure this upgrade goes smoothly and that significant benefits are provided to the city in terms of cost savings and improved lighting services. In this context, implementing additional sensor applications is not a priority. In addition, the business case for implementing these secondary applications is harder to develop, involves the scoping of new projects, and requires buy-in from a wider range of stakeholders. For these reasons, most cities still see the deployment of additional application on their street lighting network as a pilot project, at best.

Lighting the Way

However, there are signs that these issues are being overcome. San Diego aims to lead the way, but it is not alone. Cities like Copenhagen, which is deploying a street lighting platform from Silver Spring Networks, and Eindhoven, working on an innovative lighting strategy with Philips, are also in the advanced guard—among others. As other cities gain confidence from the experience of these leading adopters, smart street lighting will move into its most exciting phase yet.

For further discussion about some of the most exciting developments in smart cities, please join us for the upcoming free webinar from Navigant Research, Smart Cities and the Energy Transformation, on April 25 at noon EDT. Click here to register.

 

IoT Bridging the Gap for Intelligent Small and Medium-Sized Buildings

— October 24, 2016

Intelligent BuildingLarge building owners have been investing in intelligent building technologies and leveraging these data-driven solutions to reduce costs, improve operational and energy efficiencies, and achieve broader corporate objectives like sustainability. Small and medium building (SMB) owners, on the other hand, often struggle to maintain profits and sustain slim margins with more traditional approaches. Most of these smaller buildings lack the technology to generate the kind of data that ties energy consumption to operational and bottom-line performance. As a result, there is a lost opportunity for these business owners. The Internet of Things (IoT) concept, however, is changing the conversation around building management and delivering impressive results. There are three ways that IoT is opening new doors for SMB energy efficiency and business improvement.

#1: Secure, Scalable, and Easy to Install

IoT is a concept that spans nearly every area of the economy. It is about the connectivity of devices, data, and personalization of technology. IoT is an influential concept when considering energy management and operational efficiency in smaller facilities because it is a pathway to cost-effective technology deployment. An IoT platform for building energy management systems (BEMSs) entails sensors, gateways, and wireless communications to deliver better data to the analytics engine that in turn presents better insights and actions to customers. The significant reductions in cost from this technology approach—as compared to traditional controls and automation—make the benefits of developing intelligent buildings attainable for smaller facilities.

IoT-enabled intelligent building systems are secure, scalable, and interoperable. They assist with open communications and standards within the building space, assisting with reduced costs and improved integration possibilities. Security is becoming a high-profile aspect of intelligent building investment decisions. Solutions providers are installing network-secure IoT platforms that scale to support the same opportunities for improved efficiency and reduced costs in small and medium-sized buildings that are available in large buildings. IoT can deliver essential data, down to the asset level, to support better directives via the BEMS.

The bottom line is that IoT solutions deliver data-driven insights to SMB decision makers without significant business disruption for installation—and at a cost that is justifiable.

#2: Unifying Tool for Multiple Challenges

Energy management remains an important use case for BEMSs because the performance improvements of building systems deliver a transparent ROI through utility bill reductions.

  • Data aggregation: The promise of the intelligent building—and IoT for that matter—is the ability to have a centralized view of building operations to direct changes and make investments that drive down costs and improve experience. One of the big challenges for new customers is that their business has operated with management silos. Spreadsheets, monthly bills, and rules of thumb have often dominated the approach to energy or facilities management because the work at hand is the business happening inside the walls, not facilities optimization. IoT offers customers a new unified platform to bring data together across their silos to make better informed decisions that create efficiencies and cost savings—and even enhance sales.
  • Data presentment: Once the data is centralized, another benefit of an IoT-enabled intelligent building is the visual communications of sometimes complicated data sets. Dashboards, mobile applications, and automated alerts can give customers a quick and concise view of the performance of their facility.

#3: Clear Benefits beyond Just Energy Efficiency

The pain points that drive customers to invest in IoT solutions can vary in each situation, but there are some common themes Navigant Research has identified. It is clear the vendors that are making traction with SMB customers are pitching benefits beyond just energy efficiency.

  • Retail: The centralized data of an IoT solution can be translated into information that is critical for shop owners. Occupancy and environmental data can provide insight into the customer experience: How long do shoppers stay, what route do they travel, and how long do they wait for help? These are clearly non-energy benefits, but fundamental to retail customers’ bottom lines. While the IoT solution may help optimize the environmental conditions for energy efficiency, the cost savings on energy bills are only amplified by longer or more streamlined customer experience.
  • Small and medium-sized offices: Energy efficiency is foundational to calculating intelligent building ROI. Fewer kilowatt-hours used mean fewer dollars on that monthly utility bill. There is an important soft ROI for IoT-enabled solutions for office spaces, albeit a squishy metric of productivity. There are many use cases for intelligent lighting controls, HVAC optimization, and indoor air quality that tell the story of worker productivity. It is the simple narrative that happy employees are more productive. IoT solutions provide the data-driven insight to create the necessary environments to maximize worker satisfaction.

Join Casey Talon, principal research analyst at Navigant Research, Sunita Shenoy, director of Products at Intel, Doug Harp, COO at CANDI Controls, and Vladi Shunturov, founder and president of Lucid, on October 27 for a roundtable discussion. We’ll dive further into these ideas on how IoT can bridge the gap for intelligent buildings in SMBs. Register now.

 

Is the Smart City Market Entering an Acquisition Phase?

— September 19, 2016

Intelligent BuildingIn my last blog, I wrote about how the smart city market is at an important point in its evolution. In that blog, I focused on the changing priorities for smart city projects. Another side to this evolution is the changing market dynamics as suppliers refine their approach to the market and look to extend their capabilities. The most recent Navigant Research Leaderboard Report on smart city suppliers shows the continuing evolution in strategy and offerings among key players in the market.

One important indicator of the maturity of any technology market is the level and focus of merger and acquisition (M&A) activity. It is a sign of the relative immaturity and uncertainty associated with smart cities as a market that there has been little activity in recent years. But there are indications this is changing.

Internet of Things Focus

The acquisition of sensor network company Sensity by telecoms giant Verizon is the latest example—and one of the most significant. Sensity provides sensors and network controls for street lighting systems and has been targeting the emerging market for city platforms. For Verizon, the move marks a step up in its Internet of Things (IoT) and smart cities strategy and gives it the ability to offer a range of city solutions beyond intelligent street lighting, such as traffic management, smart parking, security, and air quality monitoring. It also increases Verizon’s attractiveness as a partner in the complex ecosystem of smart city and IoT suppliers. The alignment with the company’s broader IoT strategy is important to this acquisition, as well. Indeed, the growing focus on IoT capabilities across the technology industry is one of the main reasons why the smart city acquisition picture is changing. Cisco’s $1.4 billion acquisition of IoT platform provider Jasper Technologies in early 2016 can be seen as part of the same pattern. While enhancing their ability to play a bigger role in the IoT space, Verizon and Cisco are also developing strong smart city platforms. Moves from other big players for sensor technology and IoT platform providers are likely to be on the cards.

Analytics Companies

It is not only IoT technologies that are being acquired; analytics companies are also on the shopping list. Urban Engines, a specialist in the use of advanced analytics for the Internet of Moving Things, has announced that it is to become part of Google Maps. Founded by former Google employees, this may be more of a homecoming than an acquisition. However, it suggests that some of the more niche analytics providers in the smart city space will eventually find their home as part of a broader platform offering from bigger players.

Application-Specific Solutions

The third area of the market that we can expect to see more M&A activity is in application-specific solutions. This is an area with a greater history of activity. IBM, for example, has been adding to its roster of government solutions for a number of years in areas like intelligence and social care. But there has been less activity in new application areas. One exception is Silver Springs Networks’ move to strengthen its hand with the acquisition of street lighting software specialist Streetlight.Vision. If acquisition activity is stepping up across the market, the next phase could see more activity in other emerging solution areas such as smart parking and smart waste, for example.

These important developments will add spice to the conversation at Smart Cities Week in Washington, DC next week. I will be attending with other colleagues from Navigant Research and look forward to discussing these and other issues. Let me know if you would like to meet up at the event.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies, Utility Transformations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Conferences & Events","path":"\/tag\/conferences-events?page=2","date":"2\/25\/2018"}