Navigant Research Blog

Postcard from Hawaii to Nation’s Capital

— June 29, 2017

The mood at the second annual VERGE conference in Honolulu, Hawaii last week was upbeat about the future of clean energy, despite pushback on the US mainland. Apparently, those committed to a clean energy agenda, including the private sector, are more motivated than ever to push forward with aggressive programs to bring renewables resources online. They aim to not only combat climate change, but also create jobs.

Conference attendees clearly supported the supposition that clean energy is here to stay, no matter what might be unfolding in Washington, DC. The proposed dismantling of the federal Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan and recent withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Agreement on climate change only seemed to serve as motivation to push forward even harder.

Hawaii’s Renewable Energy Vision

Hawaii is the first (and so far) only state in the United States to commit to a 100% renewable energy future. Governor David Ige of Hawaii didn’t seem to blink in the face of counter currents flowing from the Trump administration. A confessed energy geek, he seemed to take particular delight in the fact that Hawaii has emerged as a key testing ground for bolstering commitments to infrastructure needed to integrate variable renewables for both power and transportation services. Since each island of Hawaii is its own separate electric grid control area and retail costs are high due to such a reliance upon imported sources of fossil fuel, Hawaii is in a unique spot. The economics in the state clearly favor renewable energy.

Industry Momentum Is for Renewables

Even Connie Lau, CEO of Hawaiian Electric Industries, reported that her investor-owned utilities brethren have all bought into the clean energy agenda. If the administrative about-face on clean energy had occurred 8 years ago, then the momentum for renewables and other clean energy may have been halted, but that time has passed. Past government and industry investments have driven down the price of solar PV, wind, and batteries while software innovation to manage such resources has scaled up.

Nevertheless, there are challenges in implementing aggressive clean energy goals. Just look at California, where the state is paying neighboring states to take excess solar production. Many models show that once one reaches 80%-90% renewables penetration, the cost of integration can jump dramatically.

One of the key tools Hawaii will rely upon to reach its 100% renewable energy goal is to integrate devices like energy storage into self-balancing distribution networks such as microgrids. As of now, over 90 MW of new energy storage devices has been authorized by state regulators to be installed among the Hawaiian islands, with the majority of that capacity—70 MW—to be installed in Oahu.

Continuing Conversation

I had the pleasure of helping to run a 4-hour workshop on how to overcome challenges to developing a microgrid at VERGE with cutting edge microgrid market makers such as ENGIE and Spirae. I also moderated a session on how microgrids boost clean energy on islands, with featured speakers from ABB—which is pushing forward with a 134 MW microgrid designed to reach 50% renewable energy on the island of Aruba by 2020—and representatives from Hawaii and the US Navy.

Ironically, there may still be some room for collaboration between Hawaii and Washington, DC in the clean energy space. As I noted in a previous in a previous blog, one area where the interests in promoting national security in DC and a clean energy agenda in Hawaii align is the microgrid space. Watch for a report on that topic later this year.

 

Three Innovative Energy Storage Projects Announced in 1Q 2017

— April 7, 2017

The energy storage industry is heating up in 2017 because of several new projects. Navigant Research’s Energy Storage Tracker 1Q17 report provides a comprehensive list of global energy storage projects and identifies new and emerging market leaders in the industry. This blog discusses some of the most notable new projects that show how these systems don’t necessarily provide just one type of service. Energy storage systems can come in several different flavors and provide multiple benefits.  

ENGIE Deutschland Kraftwerksgruppe Pfreimd Storage Plant

ENGIE Deutschland currently owns and operates a pumped hydro station in Kraftwerksgruppe Pfreimd, Germany, but the company sought to profit more effectively from the load leveling and peak shifting market. To do so, ENGIE awarded a contract to Siemens AG to install its SEISTORAGE Li-ion battery technology, power electronics, and battery management system. Rated at 12.5 MW and over 13 MWh, the battery system works in conjunction with existing pumped hydro resources and will enable the plant to provide all levels of reserve capacity—from short duration frequency regulation services to long duration bulk storage. ENGIE believes that this hybrid energy storage system illuminates the vision of its future energy storage business predicated on how to balance the volatility of renewable energy generation while providing multiple grid services. This project is set to come online in late 2017.

Vattenfall Wind Farm Battery Energy Storage System Installation

State-owned Swedish utility Vattenfall plans to install up to 1,000 Li-ion batteries to address the intermittency issues of several of its wind farms. The batteries, supplied by automaker BMW Group, are the same as the batteries used in the BMW i3 electric car, effectively providing an additional revenue stream for BMW’s existing business. Vattenfall plans to build the first a battery energy storage system (rated at 3.2 MW) at its Princess Alexia wind farm near Amsterdam. A larger 22 MW installation will be constructed at the company’s Pyn y Cymoedd wind farm in South Wales on a later date. This project is a part of National Grid’s Enhanced Frequency Response (EFR) tender issued in 2016. 

E.ON Texas Waves Wind Farm Installation

Multinational energy company E.ON looks to become one of the premier industrial energy storage businesses in the world. E.ON recently announced it will colocate short duration energy storage systems at its Pyron and Inadale wind farms in the western part of Texas. Dubbed Texas Waves, the project will collectively utilize 18.8 MW of Li-ion battery technology from Samsung SDI. The system will provide multiple ancillary services to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas market, namely wind ramping and smoothing, load leveling, and Volt/VAR support. Energy storage software provider Greensmith will provide the battery management system to each of the installations to help ensure the stacked revenue streams of the system.

The Improving Landscape of Energy Storage

Storage is shifting to become an essential component of new energy systems to ensure projects can reach maximum profitability. To match this growing popularity, companies like Tesla and Alevo are expanding internal resources to ensure they have the best and brightest minds to capitalize on new technology and opportunity in the market. Overall, the global energy storage industry is poised to continue growing quickly over the next several years. Energy storage industry stakeholders should explore new and seemingly unconventional methods to become involved in new projects. Doing so could help develop untapped markets, create new technology, and spur innovation in the industry for years to come.

 

Inexpensive Offerings Driving Deeper Penetration of Efficiency Technologies

— March 22, 2017

Technological development is evolving quickly in all areas of the energy efficient buildings market. From HVAC systems with advanced controls to building energy management systems (BEMSs) that can drive deep efficiency gains, it is possible for commercial buildings to reduce energy consumption by up to 50% or more in a well-conceived project. Software has become a ubiquitous and necessary piece of almost every building component.

Most connected, intelligent devices of all types were devised to accomplish a defined purpose while gathering volumes of data along the way. But according to IBM Research’s Global Technology Outlook 2015, 90% of the data collected in the 10 years prior to 2015 was abandoned. Additionally, 60% of sensory data collected at the edge of intelligent systems loses its value in milliseconds. Like the parable about the tree falling in a forest, if these advanced digital tools collect data but nobody uses it, does it really add value? It may … eventually.

Early Adopter Phase

A large segment of the overall building stock is still managed using older technologies, with little or no digital data to support efficient operations. Some building owners and operators have the necessary sophistication and resources to proficiently understand and utilize more advanced digital toolsets, while many others do not. It is still the early adopter stage for much of the sophisticated new technologies. This dynamic, however, is feeding other emerging trends on the energy efficient buildings landscape.

So many buildings operate inefficiently that even the most basic forays into gathering data and understanding operational efficiency can lead to significant savings. Many of the initial efficiency activities can also be done at low or no cost by simply understanding operational setpoints and other characteristics. This simple understanding can lead to energy savings from 5% to 25% or more and provide enough information to lead to more significant projects and savings over time. This trend has been identified as a valid business model in its own right, and it serves what has been recognized as a valid market need.

Innovative Business Models

EnergyAI is an example of a company that offers a no touch analysis of a building’s performance at a very low price point—approximately $25 per report. EnergyAI utilizes a company’s utility interval data and produces a comprehensive report on the buildings energy consumption patterns with a simple, itemized list of suggestions for improvement. Gridium is another company with a similar utility data approach, but with more of an ongoing presence in the building. Eco-Energy works with larger clients and annual energy spending (+$10 million) and utilizes a sophisticated software package, but it sells energy savings, not the software itself.

These business models eliminate large upfront expenditures, work within the resource and experience constraints of a typical building, and identify meaningful savings at a lower cost. They are also enabling greater penetration of efficiency initiatives in a larger portion of the global building stock. The energy efficient buildings market continues to evolve.

 

Intelligent Digital Systems Enabling New Strategic and Operational Paradigms

— March 20, 2017

Data in and of itself has little value. Dashboards and other business intelligence software are excellent at compiling and displaying collected data from a multitude of sources in a useable and understandable format. At times, however, these analytical tools do not go deep enough with intelligent calculations on that data to transform a business, increase efficiency, promote deep understanding and learning, and add the most value. In these instances, it can be a case of you don’t know what you don’t know—leaving important insights on the table.

A good yet simple example of this was outlined in an IBM white paper on facilities management. A commercial building designed to accommodate 1,800 people showed an occupancy rate (assigned space) of 66%. However, further study of the data using access card information showed that average daily occupancy was only 28%, leading to a better understanding of the actual space being used and paving the way for eliminating unnecessary costs associated with rather large and consistent underutilization of the facility.

Beware of Silos

In energy efficient buildings, care must be taken when assuming that smart components are always operating efficiently and in the best interests of whole building optimization. In a recent interview, an intelligent building component OEM stated that he has seen instances where the intelligent cooling and heating equipment each reported that they were operating at peak efficiency—but they were efficiently cooling and heating the building simultaneously. In this instance, the overlord building energy management system (BEMS) identified and resolved the issue. Intelligence systems operating in a silo can be as ineffective as data that has yet to be transformed into useful information.

Analyze the Analytics

Today, the general use case for data analytics is well understood and accepted. This acceptance arose in a similar fashion to a market dynamic that happened in the LED lighting industry. Ten years ago, questions arose when LEDs were specified for a construction or retrofit project. Today, questions arise if LEDs are not specified for a project. The same largely holds true now for BEMSs and other intelligent systems that generate analytics regarding building performance. With the variety of analytics engines available in the market—at all price points and complexity levels—it is assumed that some form of analytics will be included in any efficiency effort, no matter how deep or superficial the project is.

Open communication standards have enabled access to this disparate universe of intelligent and connected digital systems and the data they generate. The cross-pollination of information from these diverse data-driven systems opens a multitude of possibilities that reverberate across the entire organization with all key stakeholders, enabling new paradigms of strategy formulation and operational success.

 

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