Navigant Research Blog

Improved LED Christmas Lights Decorate the Tree

— December 9, 2014

As people around the globe dig through their closets this holiday season to locate strings of lights to decorate their trees and houses, a portion of those looking to decorate will decide that it is time to purchase new lights.  When those people arrive at stores or check out online retailers, they will find a wider selection of LED options than ever before.  Most of the traditional incandescent styles of string lights have been replaced with LEDs.  The question is: Will the average consumer make the upgrade?

One of the most important filters is quality.  A consumer may be interested in purchasing LEDs, but he or she first needs to know that the product will meet expectations.  Though LED decorative string lights have been available for a number of years, their quality has not always been up to par.  Early models were often quite dim.  For bare white lights, that dimness was not a large concern because the small points of light were still easily visible.  For styles with larger bulbs, and especially colored bulbs, the lack of brightness was a significant downside, as the lights hardly looked to be illuminated in any but the darkest conditions.  This shortcoming has been overcome.  Today’s LED string lights are every bit as bright as their incandescent predecessors.

On Flicker

A second quality issue that affected bare white lights was flicker.  Because LED chips can respond so quickly to changes in electrical current, alternating current (AC) power can actually cause them to turn on and off at the frequency of that power (50 to 60 times per second).  The blinking that results may not be noticeable when staring directly toward an LED light, but movement of the head or eyes can allow peripheral vision to detect the flicker.  When this occurs from dozens or hundreds of individual string lights, the effect can ruin the cheeriest holiday party.

Again, though, LED string lights on the market today have corrected this problem through improved driver technology, eliminating any perceptible flicker.  Indeed, depending on the style of light, LEDs can be virtually indistinguishable from their incandescent counterparts.

As with LED lighting for commercial and residential applications, prices for LED string lights have fallen greatly in recent years, but the LED version can still be 2 to 5 times as expensive as the comparable incandescent option.  While this range of price difference is similar to the premium paid for residential or commercial LED products, the business case for holiday lights may seem worse.

White Light, No Heat

In our recently published report, Energy Efficient Lighting for Commercial Markets, Navigant Research describes the various trends that are pushing the adoption of LED lighting and shows that upfront price parity is not a prerequisite to widespread adoption, especially if the payback period from energy savings is relatively short.  However, commercial lights operate for many more hours compared to decorative string lights, which may only be on for 6 to 8 hours per day, and for one month out of the year.

Other considerations will certainly influence consumers’ decisions as well.  Environmentally-minded purchasers might like to know that their holiday lights aren’t consuming any more electricity than necessary.  Those who are safety-conscious would surely appreciate that the lights resting on the dry needles of the trees inside their homes generate as little heat as possible, as LEDs do.  Overall, not every consumer will be ready to upgrade to LED string lights this year ‑ but the barriers are dropping fast and the future of Christmas decorations is almost certainly digital.

 

Itron Utility Week: Beyond Smart Meters

— December 1, 2014

Nearly 1,000 executives from the water, gas, and electric utility industries gathered in San Antonio between October 17 and 24 to discuss “resourcefulness” – Itron’s term for smarter grid, water, and gas utility technology and solutions – and share best practices.  The conference featured a Knowledge Center showcasing the solutions offered by both Itron and its partners, and dozens of panel sessions covering five tracks: Energy Efficiency and Conservation, Data Management & IT, Advanced Measurement & Communications, Smart Grid, and Analytics & Applications.

The opening general session featured a fascinating keynote address by Scott Klososky, principal at Future Point of View, on “Achieving Humalogy” (“digital Darwinism” and how organizations must evolve to stay relevant), and a killer poetry slam by David Bowden entitled
“Dead Leader Walking” – providing a millennial’s take on management (you can watch the keynote here, skip to 1:23:00 to view the slam).

In the Fog

Itron showcased its new grid edge intelligence solution, Itron Riva, at the meeting.  Itron Riva leverages open standards and Cisco’s IOx Fog computing platform to support Internet of Things functionality, including distributed computing power and control and analytics for automated decision-making at the network edge.  Itron Riva also delivers an integrated, hybrid radio frequency/power line communications (RF/PLC) network, which dynamically selects the best network path for the environment.  Itron Riva has been tested and debugged in a Hong Kong deployment with CKP Power.

Itron notes that the hybrid architecture means the system can flexibly switch from the RF solution (in the winter, for example, when foliage isn’t blocking the path) to PLC (in the summer).  The solution is also good for utilities with both rural and urban environments to cover.

At its Alliance Briefing, the president of Itron’s electricity group, Mark de Vere White, shared his insight on how the smart grid market is shaping up.  De Vere White noted that, while the North American market had slowdowns post-American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding, the company sees that turning around now, and added that managing solar is a high priority.  Globally, Itron is “very optimistic” about 2015 and anticipates smart grid market acceleration in 2016 and 2017.  Itron’s ERDF Linky deployment in France will begin in the second half of 2015.

Spanning the Globe

In the Asia Pacific region, Itron is seeing activity in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, Japan, and Tonga.  De Vere White also noted growing Latin American interest in Brazil, Mexico, Columbia, Ecuador, and Chile.

Other topics emphasized at Itron Utility Week included smart city technology and how smart grids and smart cities intersect (including a presentation by Amy Aussieker of Envision Charlotte), as well as Itron’s new managed services offering, Itron Total Services.

 

How Building Innovations Can Help the United States and China Tackle Climate Change

— November 17, 2014

Under the terms of the U.S.-China Joint Announcement on Climate Change, China has agreed for the first time to set a limit on the rise of its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.  As the two biggest economies in the world, the United States and China have the ultimate responsibility for leadership in tackling climate change.  The next big hurdle is driving emissions downward.  Federal regulation on climate change in the United States has been at a standstill, but elements of this agreement shed light on opportunities to reduce emissions while stimulating the economy.

We know buildings demand about 40% of all energy used in the United States, and there is a lot of room for improvement in how we live and work in buildings.  In China, the opportunities to tackle inefficient building operations are just beginning to unfold.  In fact, China’s State Council Development Research Center projects that energy efficiency in buildings could provide 25% of China’s new power needs by 2020.  The central government projects that, by 2020, 60% of the population will be urbanized and more than 1 trillion square feet of new commercial and public buildings will be added to the country’s building stock (learn more from Navigant Research’s reports, Energy Efficient Buildings Asia Pacific and Smart Cities).

Measure, Monitor, Manage, and Mitigate

As the saying goes: you can’t manage what you don’t measure.  The first big benefit of smart building technologies is insight into how your facility is operating.  In order to make improvements, you must have a baseline.  Recognizing this challenge, cities across the United States (including New York City, Seattle, and Chicago) have passed building benchmarking laws to start a new wave of energy awareness.  A wide array of smart building solutions is available to help building owners track their energy use to meet these new demands.

Smart buildings are defined by integrated and dynamic systems.  From the innovators in building energy management systems (as detailed in Navigant Research’s Leaderboard Report: Building Energy Management Systems) to advanced wireless controls for smart buildings, technology is helping building operators and decision makers shift their operations to new schemes for continuous improvement.  Smart building solutions redesign the processes for monitoring and managing systems from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning to plug loads, and in doing so, provide new ways to mitigate GHG emissions from building operations.

The development of smart buildings should be a keystone in the collaboration and innovation targets of the U.S.-China Climate Agreement, because the enabling technologies not only dramatically reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, but also make real economic sense.

 

Smart Building Startups Continue to Flourish

— November 17, 2014

Like the “Harvard of the [insert region here],” “the Next Silicon Valley” is a term so trite that it has become meaningless.  You may have heard of the Silicon Hills, the Silicon Strip, Silicon Wadi, or even the Silicon Valley of the East.  It seems that anyone with a pulse is trying to woo tech entrepreneurs into the next Silicon cluster.  Nevertheless, tech activity is not limited to Northern California.  A recent analysis by the Financial Times found that 60% of “unicorns” (tech startups that reach a $1 billion valuation) were created outside of California’s Bay Area.

Indeed, many local governments are trying to establish startup ecosystems to rival Silicon Valley, including the government of Washington, D.C.  Recently, Mayor Vince Gray announced the awarding of grants to tech startups totaling over $800,000.  Several of these companies represent the wave of innovation occurring in smart buildings.  Aquicore, a real-time energy management software for commercial real estate and industrial facilities, received $122,500.  And Azert, the developer of Smart(er) Socket, wall sockets integrated with Apple’s iBeacon technology and Wi-Fi, also received $122,500.

Other People’s Stuff

It might seem strange to think of wall sockets communicating, and even stranger to think of any building infrastructure using an Apple technology.  What’s more, the idea of a software startup that relies entirely on building controls hardware made and installed by other vendors was until recently unthinkable.  In the past, building systems were specifically designed not to work with other vendors’ products in order to ensure a long-term market for replacements and upgrades.  But the convergence of building technology and information technology, the adoption of open protocols, and greater integration between building automation systems have lowered the barriers to entry in the smart building market.

These startups demonstrate that the competitive landscape of smart buildings is changing.  It’s easier than ever to get building data, meaning that a wider pool of competitors is emerging.  What’s striking, and hopefully indicative of future trends, is that these companies are springing up in Washington, D.C., away from the established tech hub of Silicon Valley and away from established global building controls manufacturers.  Future innovation in smart buildings can be driven by anyone, anywhere.

 

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