Navigant Research Blog

New Demand Response/Energy Storage Partnership Poised to Reduce Customer Deployment Hurdles

— September 12, 2017

In my most recent Navigant Research blog, I highlighted how load management and optimization solutions, which include demand response (DR) and energy storage, fit within the energy as a service (EaaS) framework. The EaaS solutions framework is now positioned to support how corporate commercial and industrial (C&I) energy and sustainability managers apply these new technologies and business model innovations to meet their energy management and sustainability needs.

EaaS Deployment Options

In Navigant Research’s Energy as a Service report on the evolution of EaaS, I highlight how EaaS solutions like load management and optimization will be deployed, which can be summarized as follows:

  • Pure-play EaaS solutions provider: Customers engage with a pure-play EaaS provider such as a solar PV developer or an energy efficiency performance contracting provider that provides just a single financed solution.
  • Bundled EaaS solutions provider: Vendors offer multiple EaaS solutions across a project development/financing platform that meet customer needs while also decreasing their customer acquisition costs.
  • Integrated facilities management plus EaaS solutions: A single vendor manages the customer’s day-to-day building operations and EaaS solutions over longer-term agreements that can enable financing innovation.
  • Managed energy services agreement (MESA): Customers with predictable energy use and spend outsource their entire energy management operations to a comprehensive EaaS provider under long-term agreements to unleash long-term financing innovation.
  • Asset monetization or public-private partnerships: Private and publicly traded C&I companies, universities, or municipalities monetize their energy assets in a sale leaseback arrangement that results in the outsourcing of energy operations.

One significant challenge for the deployment of new load management and optimization EaaS solutions to date from the customer perspective is that the market is populated by pure-play solutions providers. This scenario presents a challenge to C&I customers given the potential interdependence of solutions like DR and energy storage on the overall business case for deploying these technologies.

Potential of DR/Energy Storage Partnership

However, a recent partnership announcement by CPower and Stem will combine Stem’s energy storage capabilities services with CPower’s DR and curtailment services to better manage customer energy load and spend. Given the current contracting and revenue models that each vendor provides, an integrated Stem/CPower offering has the potential for an improved customer savings business case that can exceed the business case of each technology individually, as highlighted below:

  • For existing Stem customers, this partnership can result in an increased bonus payment over their equipment lease payment/demand charge savings scenario given the added DR market participation that CPower can enable. Stem’s existing customers can also benefit from an improved battery use case scenario over time given that additional building controls under CPower DR technology control can be leveraged instead of just the battery energy storage system (BESS).
  • For Stem sales contacts looking to deploy new BESSs, this partnership can result in a better bonus payment scenario given that a potentially smaller BESS could be installed (or one with a lower cost use case scenario over time), thereby potentially lowering the equipment lease subscription price.
  • And for existing CPower customers and sales contacts looking to participate in DR programs, this partnership can result in and improved DR market participation revenue scenario given the added response capabilities that the deployment of a Stem BESS can enable. This can help reduce the over subscription/under commitment challenges that DR aggregators face given the need to keep building occupants comfortable during demand response events.

It will be important to keep an eye on how the CPower/Stem partnership handles the integration of dispatch algorithms and customer dashboards as the partnership matures. But this partnership appears poised to reduce customer barriers for the deployment of integrated DR/energy storage EaaS solutions.

 

Smart Dust Has Yet to Settle, but the Hype Flourishes

— September 7, 2017

Smart dust … it sounds like a magical substance sprinkled on dumber things. Which is kind of true. The concept has been making the hype-cycle rounds late this summer and setting off some industry buzz among megatrend watchers during an otherwise lackluster news and information cycle.

But smart dust is not all that new a concept. Not long ago, it might have been known by the more mundane and geeky term micro-electromechanical systems, or MEMS, which is common in the computer chip world. Lump it together with the much hyped artificial intelligence (AI) notion and presto, smart dust gets new life.

Motes Not Dust Mites

So, what is smart dust? It is a swarm of tiny electronic sensors, some evidently smaller than a red blood cell, designed to float in the air and do various things. These tiny devices, known as motes, are self-powered. The idea is to unleash hundreds or thousands of them, have them interconnect wirelessly, and then perform a task or set of tasks. Think of releasing a batch over a farm for testing soil chemistry or pesticide levels.

Smart Dust for Energy Management

This smart dust could also be used in homes or commercial settings to reduce energy use. That was one of the use cases imagined by Kris Pister, a professor at the University of California Berkeley and smart dust pioneer. He has been tinkering with smart dust since at least 2001, when California was in the midst of an energy crisis. Back then, he worked on the technology with colleagues at Berkeley’s Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) in an effort to find new ways to conserve energy. The idea never quite took off as imagined.

The idea for dust networks goes back further to when the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and RAND Corporation worked on the idea in the early 1990s. One can imagine the use of smart dust over a battlefield, feeding field commanders with relevant data in real-time to get the upper hand on an enemy. The idea can even be traced to novelist Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy; dust in the books is a mysterious cosmic particle that is a central plot device.

A Cloud of Potential

Needless to say, smart dust motes have not made much of an impact outside the labs. Nonetheless, given the potential and the many swirling technologies of AI (e.g., deep learning, machine learning, smart robots, and the rest), smart dust’s future could be quite amazing, though that remains on the horizon. For now, one can keep the idea of smart dust on the radar while focusing on the more practical emerging technology trend affecting the grid and other industries, namely the Internet of Things, a topic extensively covered by Navigant Research.

 

Customers Hold Keys to Growth of Turnkey Energy as a Service Solution Providers

— August 15, 2017

A recent Navigant Research blog highlights how corporate commercial and industrial (C&I) energy and sustainability managers are choosing to apply new technology and business model innovations to meet their energy management and sustainability needs. These new customer choices are giving rise to the growth of energy as a service (EaaS) solutions. Navigant Research’s recently released report on the evolution of EaaS defines specific solutions that make up a comprehensive EaaS solution offering:

  • Energy portfolio advisory solutions: Comprehensive, enterprisewide strategic guidance to help customers navigate their unique procurement, energy management, financing, business model, and technology opportunities across all energy management and sustainability needs
  • Onsite energy supply: Distributed generation solutions like solar PV, combined heat and power, diesel and natural gas gensets, microturbines, and fuel cells that improve energy supply
  • Offsite energy supply: Including electricity procurement options from offsite sources in retail choice deregulated electricity and gas markets and from emerging large-scale, offsite renewable energy procurement business models
  • Energy efficiency and building optimization solutions: Comprehensive energy efficiency assessment, business case analysis, financing, implementation, monitoring and verification, and building commissioning services to reduce energy spend and use
  • Load management and optimization solutions: Comprehensive, end-to-end energy management solutions to optimize energy supply, demand, and load at the site and enterprisewide, including demand response (DR), distributed energy storage, microgrid controls, electric vehicle charging equipment, and building energy management and building automation systems and software controls

Turnkey Solutions to Drive Growth

C&I customers that begin to take advantage of these new solutions will increasingly look to turnkey solutions providers that can provide not only strategic advice across their property portfolios, but execution expertise as well. The key driver to enabling the growth of turnkey EaaS solutions vendors will be the ability to deliver comprehensive financing solutions to help customers avoid spending capital on energy projects. However, there are two additional drivers that vendors who are considering creating and delivering turnkey EaaS solutions will need to consider:

  • Historically, C&I customers have needed multiple regional partners to manage even a portion of their energy management needs. Turnkey EaaS vendors seeking to address C&I customers’ portfolio-wide needs for EaaS will require widely trained and deeply experienced advisory capabilities to address their customers’ complex energy procurement, financing, and technology deployment needs. For example, in the United States, a turnkey provider will need to have the depth of regional expertise under one roof necessary to address customer strategic needs in diverse energy markets and climate zones like Texas, California, New York, the Southeast, or the Midwest.
  • Experienced C&I energy and sustainability managers have endured years of disappointment from energy use and cost reduction claims that never materialized. Moreover, many of these managers have still not yet even tried to reduce energy spend. What C&I customers truly want is guaranteed lower energy costs, whether from solar PV, energy storage, energy efficiency, or DR. Vendors that blend execution expertise across all EaaS solutions with financing tools to guarantee cost savings through a single point of sale will be best positioned.

To date, with customer-sited distributed energy resources, too much emphasis has been placed on trying to figure out where to sell technology outside of a focus on solving customer problems. For turnkey EaaS vendors, market growth will not necessarily be led on a technology-first basis. For at-scale revenue generation, these vendors should start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. Navigant Research anticipates that vendors that place a keen eye on how to bring turnkey, customer-focused EaaS solutions into the market through a trusted, single point of contact with a financed savings guarantee will be at a competitive advantage.

 

New Analytics Solutions Give Consumers More Energy Choice

— July 13, 2017

Residential consumers are becoming increasingly aware of their energy consumption and are interested in how they can reduce their use, save money on energy bills, and become more environmentally conscious. More and more customers are receiving home energy reports, which detail energy consumed and compare usage to that of neighbors. Opower (Oracle) achieved more than 11 TWh of energy reduction across 100 utility partners with these types of reports. Consumers are also logging into mobile apps that disaggregate devices to help them make smarter choices about where to target energy saving efforts.

Despite increasing efforts and awareness about energy, many consumers still do not know where their energy actually comes from. Most people may have a vague sense of their country’s energy mix and imports, such as the US energy mix depicted in the figure below, or that the UK imports 60% of its electricity-generating fuel. However, when a consumer flips a light switch, turns on their TV, or adjusts their thermostat, the energy that powers those actions is coming from whatever power plant is turned on to meet that incremental demand. This means the energy your light bulb is using could be drawing power from a coal plant, a natural gas facility, or a solar panel.

US Energy Mix: 2016

(Source: US Energy Information Administration)

New Technology Helps Track Generation Sources

In the past, there hasn’t been a method for determining the generation source that is meeting demand in real time. However, a non-profit called WattTime has developed a data analytics software that solves this problem. The software, which was the brainchild of a hackathon event in 2013, detects where the electricity powering the grid is coming from and the actual emissions impacts of people and companies using electricity. Not only does it detect this information, but it can also automatically power devices when energy sources are the cleanest. It can be installed in any Internet-connected device, making it flexible and easy to implement. This tool empowers customers to have a choice in the type of energy they are using and how much they are emitting when they consume electricity. WattTime’s software is gaining traction, having partnered with companies like Microsoft, Energate, and most recently, the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). WattTime has joined RMI as a subsidiary organization to foster the transition to a cleaner, more decentralized grid.

Looking Forward to a Cleaner Energy Future

Data analytics solutions like these are empowering consumers to make smarter energy choices, facilitating the transition to a cleaner, more decentralized and optimized grid, and solving challenges associated with reducing carbon emissions. Currently, emissions are calculated based on average factors, not based on the actual emissions that are generated depending on the source providing the next kilowatt-hour of power. As countries and organizations around the world move forward with reducing greenhouse gases, real, data-based information on emissions can help consumers understand how their actions directly affect greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to the overall goal of a cleaner, greener world.

 

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