Navigant Research Blog

EPA Looks to Make EV Charging More Energy Efficient

— July 24, 2015

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants to reduce the energy consumption of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) by developing its first ENERGY STAR specification for this category of products. As we know, electric vehicle (EV) chargers are idle for the majority of the day, and the specification will address the amount of power consumed while not in use.

The ENERGY STAR program will initially focus on alternating current (AC) (Level 1 and 2) charging, but the EPA is also looking at direct current (DC) charging.

According to the EPA document:

“Emerging EVSE could include features such as the ability to receive DC power from PV panels or local storage; provide DC power to other devices in a building via USB, Ethernet, or other power transmission medium; supply AC power to a building or specific appliances; coordinate power distribution with other entities in the building; include electricity storage internal to the EVSE; and enabling transmission of power from a vehicle to a home.”

Enabling DC chargers to share the incoming power via USB, AC power, Ethernet, or other media is an interesting way of getting more value out of available power. DC chargers are only used in short bursts for fast charging, so finding ways to smartly manage them as a building resource makes sense. Building in a power converter enables the charger to integrate into other stationary devices, such as using DC power from a solar panel locally instead of sending it back to the grid where its value is often less. I haven’t seen any DC chargers that can do this today, so it will be interesting to see how manufacturers develop products with these capabilities.

Paying to Park

Car Charging is looking at increasing the utility of EV chargers through a different approach. The company is assessing a fee of $0.08  per minute to EV owners who leave their vehicles plugged in but not charging for longer than 15 minutes after the charging session ends, according to PluginCars.com. The 15-minute grace period seems sensible, as many customers receive automated alerts when charging is completed. The fee is a considerable incentive for people to be conscientious about moving their cars after a completed charge, which makes them available for other (revenue-generating) charging sessions, which is critical for EVSE to become profitable.

At the EV Roadmap Conference starting July 29 in Portland, Oregon, I’ll be moderating a panel where several industry luminaries will be discussing the latest innovations in smart EV charging. Stop by and check it out, or leave a comment here with questions for the panel.

 

New Efforts Address EV Affordability

— June 29, 2015

Power_Paddle_webThrough the first 5 months of 2015, according to data from Hybridcars.com, plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales are down in the United States by 4% from 2014. This is due, in part, to the current price of gasoline being lower than the 2014 price by $0.89 cents per gallon (per the U.S. Energy Information Administration), as well as the drop off in sales of the Chevrolet Volt in anticipation of the updated model coming out soon. In fact, if the year-over-year Volt sales are ignored, the rest of the industry is actually slightly ahead of last year’s pace.

The higher upfront cost of PEVs is clearly one of the major hurdles to greater electric vehicle (EV) sales, along with greater consumer awareness of their benefits in reduced fuel cost, performance, and drivability. The higher price tag precludes many prospective buyers from considering a PEV, although several models are below the current average new car transaction price of $33,363, according to Edmunds.com.

Making PEVs more affordable would bring in EV buyers from a broader audience, as data from a recent Navigant Research survey of consumers in the United States indicates that the interest in PEVs is not limited to high-income families. Of the survey respondents who reported having an income between $25,000 and $50,000 annually, 15% said that they preferred their next vehicle purchase to be a PEV, which was higher than those with income of $50,000 to $150,000 annually (9%).

Incentives and Research

California is trying to make PEVs more appealing to lower-income families in areas where air quality is a concern. New programs for people living in the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District or South Coast Air Quality Management District provided incentives of up to $9,500 on a PEV purchase depending on the individual’s income level. While it won’t prompt a spike in nationwide sales, a successful program could encourage other regions to similarly target getting more PEVs into lower-income households.

The European Commission is also targeting lowering the cost of PEVs through three research projects. As reported by Automotive Fleet, the 3Ccar project is focusing on reducing the cost of the electronic components, which, along with the battery pack, are the primary contributors to the additional cost of PEVs. Greater volumes of PEV sales will lead to more competition in electronics, which will lower the cost and result in more sales.

Utilities are stepping up by creating programs to make EVs cheaper to operate and to make recharging easier. On June 8, the Edison Electric Institute signed a memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that will make utilities more active participants in reducing the cost of electric transportation and to build on the DOE’s goal of making EVs as affordable as a gasoline car by 2022. Greater utility involvement is critical to reducing EVs’ operational costs as well as providing the baseline charging infrastructure for consumer confidence that EVs can be recharged wherever drivers need to go in urban areas.

 

How Incentives Are Driving EV Markets in California and Oregon

— June 22, 2015

In a recent study conducted by Navigant Research, 1,002 consumers in the United States were asked their opinions on electric vehicle (EV) ownership, its advantages, and its disadvantages. The survey revealed some not-so-surprising results of incentives and how they affect EV purchases, including how consumer opinions on tax credits and charging infrastructure are influencing the decision on whether to purchase electric cars.

In Oregon, where 23.5% of participants responded that the biggest impediment to purchasing an EV was the premium price, the only incentive offered is a credit of $750 on the purchase of a battery electric vehicle (BEV). The percentage was lower in California, which offers $2,500 in rebates for each battery-powered vehicle and allows EVs to travel in HOV lanes for free. Of those surveyed, 6.5% of California residents responded that the premium price was the reason they would be less likely to purchase an EV.

Range anxiety appears to be much more of a factor in California, with 19.6% of respondents saying it is their primary reason for not purchasing an EV. In Oregon, the number is 11.8%. While there are 2,114 charging stations in California and only 402 in Oregon, the number of charging stations per capita in California is .000055, whereas it’s .0001 in Oregon. This means that there are twice as many publicly available charging stations for each person in Oregon.

As far as the number of EVs in each state, the ratio is even worse. According to Navigant Research’s Electric Vehicle Geographic Forecasts report, in 2015, 106,550 light duty plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are expected to be sold in California while only 4,872 are expected to be sold in Oregon. If California’s infrastructure for EVs does not keep up with growing EV sales, the ratio will get worse. However, three major California utilities (Pacific Gas& Electric, San Diego Gas & Electric, and Southern California Edison) have petitioned to install thousands of EV chargers.

What It Boils Down To

California and Oregon are fairly similar geographically: both are located on the Pacific coast, with temperate areas along the shoreline, and hotter weather east of the mountain ranges. However, the opinions and market influences for EV purchases are very different in both states. California consumers are disadvantaged in infrastructure, with a lower number of public EV chargers both per capita and per EV purchased. Oregonians receive a lesser financial incentive to purchase an EV, with only around one-third the state incentive as Californians receive. However, when it comes to actual purchases, Californians are still coming out ahead. In the light duty EV market, one car is projected to be purchased for every 364 people in California. In Oregon, the ratio is 815 people per PEV. So, when it comes to incentivizing EV purchases, it seems like offering strong financial incentives and HOV access takes precedence.

 

California’s Investments Pay Off in PEVs

— June 3, 2015

Analysis of the penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) per capita reveals that, to the surprise of no one, California is far ahead of the rest of the United States. Based on data from Navigant Research’s recently published Electric Vehicle Geographic Forecasts report, 7 of the 20 areas with the most PEVs on the road in 2015 are in the state.

As show in the below table, California’s seven metropolitan statistical areas are near the top of the list for PEVs sold per 100,000 residents. California’s route to success has included substantial investments in PEVs and EV charging infrastructure through incentives, project grants from the California Energy Commission and other state institutions, and by providing PEV access to HOV lanes. However, the coveted HOV stickers are nearly gone, so it would not be surprising if PEV sales in the Golden State slow unless new stickers are made available.

PEVs on the Road per 100,000 Residents

John blog table, june 2(Sources: Navigant Research, U.S. Census Bureau)

The regions on this list have many things in common that make owning a PEV favorable, including demographics like age and higher average incomes that lean toward PEV ownership. All of the states wherein these regions lie have some form of incentive for buying or driving an EV or for purchasing a charging station, often in the form of tax credits or the ability to drive in HOV lanes. Also, nearly all of the areas on the list were recipients of charging infrastructure funded by the Department of Energy’s EV Project and ChargePoint America projects, which deployed thousands of Level 1-2 and direct current (DC) fast charging stations between 2010 and 2013. The exceptions that were able to also create demand in PEVs are Honolulu, Denver, and Miami, although each area has received some federal funding for EV programs.

Investments in public EV charging infrastructure by federal or state agencies (or increasingly utilities) have resulted in greater PEV awareness by the general public, as well as increased PEV sales as potential buyers feel greater confidence knowing that they can charge at familiar spots around town. Conversely, states without investments in EV charging infrastructure have seen much less PEV penetration.

 

 

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