Navigant Research Blog

In Bangladesh, Solar Boom Benefits All

— August 18, 2014

More solar PV systems are installed in Bangladesh than in Germany and the United States combined.  At the end of 2013, Bangladesh had an estimated 2.9 million solar PV systems installed compared to 1.4 million in Germany and 445,000 in the United States.

This is despite the fact that Bangladesh is one of the poorest countries on the planet, with per-capita income of less than $3,000 per year.  In Bangladesh, solar home systems (SHSs) range from 10W to 200W.  Approximately 50% of all systems sold in Bangladesh are between 20W and 30W – roughly 1% of the capacity of a medium-sized residential system in the United States, but enough to power a few compact fluorescent or LED lights, charge a cell phone, or power a radio.  At an average cost of about $230 for a 20W SHS in Bangladesh, an upfront cash payment is out of reach for people who make less than $9 per day.  But thanks to the success of micro-credit programs that made Mohamad Yunus and Grameen Bank household names, SHSs are affordable to all.

Home Systems Multiply

Grameen Shakti, based in Dhaka, is the solar power arm of the Grameen Bank and is the leading SHS installer in Bangladesh, with an estimated 1.3 million installations to date.  These installations represent more than 30 MW of installed capacity.   The model relies on an extensive network of sales agents who can reach remote areas, low interest loans, and numerous grants that provide seed funding.  Grameen Shakti provides free operation and maintenance services for 3 years after installation, with low-cost service options thereafter.

With a strong emphasis on grassroots education, Grameen Shakti has contributed to the industry’s high visibility in Bangladesh, where there are now around 40 providers of SHSs.   The company sells approximately 1000 SHSs per day and is targeting 2 million SHS sales by the end of 2016.

The government of Bangladesh – whose low-lying topography makes it especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change – has set a target of generating 5% of its power from renewable energy sources by 2015 and 10% by 2020.  The pipeline of projects started small, but is now growing considerably.  The country has approximately 10 GW installed capacity, with only 75% of that power actually available at any given time due to grid reliability issues.  That relates to roughly 136 kWh available per capita each year – one of the lowest rates in the world.  Compare that to an average household consumption of 1000 kWh per month here in Portland, Oregon.

Changing the Model

Rahimafrooz Renewable Energy Ltd. (RREL) represents the growing number of hybrid companies with a foot in the SHS market and many others, including agriculture, healthcare, education, telecommunications, rural street lighting, and marketplaces, as well as government and private institutions.  RREL has installed 300 solar water and irrigation pumps, 2 MW of solar rooftop solutions, and more than 100 solar-powered telecom base stations in Bangladesh.

Meanwhile, the company’s not-for-profit venture, Rural Services Foundation (RSF), has disseminated nearly 426,000 SHSs under the Infrastructure Development Co. Ltd. (IDCOL) program, representing more than an estimated 12 MW at the end of 2013.  This makes it the second-largest SHS installer in Bangladesh, behind Grameen Shakti.

As I’ve covered previously in blogs and Navigant Research’s report, Solar PV Consumer Products, countries such as Bangladesh, Kenya, Tanzania, and others are challenging traditional Western perceptions of developing countries and approaches for tackling poverty.   Investors have also taken notice.  Solar’s very favorable current market forces (low cost) and unique advantages in economic development (health benefits and cost savings) can be leveraged to enable the continued expansion of solar PV to even the most remote regions – and the poorest countries.

 

Preparing for the Worst, Cities Seek Resilience

— August 7, 2014

The Rockefeller Foundation is asking cities to apply for the latest phase of its 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge.  This challenge aims to enable 100 cities to better address the shocks and stresses of the 21st century.  The selected cities receive support from the Rockefeller Foundation to create and implement resilience plans and to hire chief resilience officers (CROs) to oversee strategies.  Thirty-two cities – including, for example, Bangkok, New Orleans, Durban, Mexico City, and Rotterdam – were selected in the first phase of the competition.  San Francisco appointed the first CRO in April 2014.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 2014 report on the impacts of global climate change highlights the particular vulnerability of urban infrastructures.  The impact of climate change on cities can take many forms – including increased temperature, drought, and storms – but the most direct threat comes from rising sea levels.  Approximately 360 million urban residents live in coastal areas less than 10 meters above sea level.  China alone has more than 78 million people living in vulnerable, low elevation cities.  Miami, New York City, and Tokyo are also among the top 20 cities at the highest risk of coastal flooding, along with Asian megacities such as Mumbai, Shanghai, Bangkok, and Dhaka.   The 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan and Hurricane Sandy off the East Coast of the United States in 2012 demonstrated how even the most advanced cities can be devastated by extreme events.

After the Flood

The threat to American cities is further emphasized in the Third National Climate Assessment from the U.S.  Global Change Research ProgramMiami, in particular, is developing into a test case for the impact of the climate changes on U.S. cities and the ability of civic and business leaders to collaborate in response.

Resilience can be characterized as the ability of cities and communities to bounce back from catastrophic events, as well as respond to more gradual changes that threaten well-being or economic stability.  Resilience is not just a question of identifying and acting on specific climate change impacts; it also requires an assessment of each city’s complex and interconnected infrastructure and institutional systems.   New York, for example, initiated a major study of the how the city’s infrastructure and services can be better designed to cope with events like Hurricane Sandy – including more resilient, distributed energy grids and new approaches to land use policy in flood-prone areas.

Urban Sensitivities

Resilience is also a driver for new technology adoption.  The Sensing City project in Christchurch, New Zealand is an interesting test case for how smart city technologies can support resilience planning.  Christchurch was devastated by an earthquake in 2011 that left 185 people dead; the rebuilding project is estimated to eventually cost around NZ$40 billion ($35 million) in total.  The aim of Sensing City is to use sensor technologies and data analytics, including smartphones and sensors embedded in new construction, to lay the foundation for a healthier, more sustainable, and more resilient city.

Coping with the threats and uncertainties of the 21st century will require a deeper understanding of the normal operations of a city and its vulnerabilities.  That’s why resilience is becoming one of the key attributes of any smart city and a significant driver for the smart city market.

 

European Grids Look to RF Mesh Networks

— July 23, 2014

Communications networks for smart grids have evolved very differently in Europe than they have in North America, with power line communications (PLC) and cellular technology the leading forms of communications thus far for smart meter connectivity across the pond.  Here in the United States, the availability of unlicensed (free) spectrum in the 900 MHz band has led to the leadership of proprietary radio frequency (RF) mesh solutions, such as those provided by Itron, Silver Spring Networks, Elster, Tantalus, Landis+Gyr, and others.

The European Commission, however, has taken steps in recent months to bring 48 European nations into alignment on spectrum policy across the continent.  Specifically for smart meters and smart grid applications (and other machine-to-machine [M2M] applications), the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) announced in February a framework whereby 5.6 MHz of spectrum, from 870 MHz to 875.6 MHz, will be set aside for unlicensed M2M uses, including smart meters and grids.  Details can be found in CEPT’s Electronic Communications Committee (ECC) Report 189.

Indoor Reading

CEPT cited several reasons for supporting interoperability, including the creation of economies of scale and cost reduction, reduction in the risk of cross-border interference, and greater flexibility.  The choice of sub-1 GHz spectrum, where propagation characteristics are stronger than at higher bands, makes the spectrum suitable for reading meters that may be placed indoors, even in basements — a common practice in European nations.

Ofcom, the United Kingdom’s telecommunications regulatory body, this year made amendments to its Wireless Telegraphy Act that allow for commercial operations on a license-exempt basis at 870 MHz to 876 MHz as of June 27, 2014; similar action is likely across the 48 nations that participate in CEPT.

This is good news for vendors, like those named above, but also for utilities across Europe seeking more flexibility in their smart meter and grid deployments.  RF mesh solutions are often less expensive than PLC for near area networks, though that varies widely depending upon the structure of the grid in the region as well as the topography.  Nonetheless, some smart meter/communications solutions providers have struggled financially over the past couple of years after ramp-up for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding created a spike in demand that has since fallen rather sharply.

Room to Grow

Europe is poised to be the next big growth area for smart metering, thanks to the European Union’s (EU’s) 20-20-20 initiative, which a majority of European nations support.  Navigant Research estimates that current penetration of smart meters across Europe is just 15%, compared with more than 40% in North America.  While several nations have made significant progress in deployment (Italy, Scandinavia), Germany isn’t yet on board with the 20-20-20 initiative, and the United Kingdom and France are just getting rolling.  In Eastern Europe, there has been minimal activity to date, particularly in Russia, home to nearly 100 million meters.  For details on Navigant Research’s global smart meter forecast, look for our report Smart Meters, slated for publication later this year.

The Market for Smart Meters, Europe: 2013-2023

(Source: Navigant Research)

Smart meter shipments in North America are expected to total 121 million between 2014 and 2023; that total is forecast to be 221 million in Europe.  That’s more than $18 billion in anticipated revenue for smart meters — a market that surely every smart meter vendor will watch.

 

In the Islands, Renewable Energy Scales Up Rapidly

— July 22, 2014

Renewable energy project developers are touring islands these days, salivating at the opportunity to displace diesel-powered electricity systems that can cost as much as $1/kWh with significantly lower-cost clean power.  Prominent examples include Iceland, where, according to the country’s National Energy Authority, roughly 84% of primary energy use comes from indigenous renewable energy sources (the majority from geothermal); Hawaii, where energy costs are 10% of the state’s GDP and where the state government has set a goal of reaching 70% clean energy by 2030; and Scotland (part of a larger island), with a goal of 100% renewable energy by 2020.  Several smaller, equally interesting island electrification initiatives present great opportunities for companies looking for renewable energy deployment opportunities that are truly cost-effective for customers and developers.

These opportunities include:

  • In Equatorial Guinea, a 5 MW solar microgrid planned for Annobon, an island with 5,000 inhabitants off the west coast of Africa, is intended to supply 100% of the power for residential needs.  The project is funded by the national government with power produced at a rate 30% cheaper than diesel, the current primary fuel source.  It is scheduled for completion in 2015 and is being installed through a partnership between Princeton Power Systems, GE Power & Water, and MAECI Solar.
  • The Danish island of Samsø is the first net zero carbon island, where 34 MW of wind power generate more electricity than is consumed on the island.  Fossil fuels are still utilized, so  Samsø is not truly a 100% renewable energy island as often reported.  The project was conceived and designed as part of a 10-year process begun in 1997, following the Kyoto climate meeting in Japan.
  • The island of Tokelau, an atoll in the South Pacific, is home to 1,500 inhabitants and produces up to 150% of its electrical needs with solar PV, coconut biofuels-powered generators, and battery storage – displacing 2,000 barrels of diesel per year and $1 million in fuel costs.
  • El Hierro, the westernmost of Spain’s Canary Islands, is home to 10,000 residents.  With an innovative combination of wind power and pumped hydro acting in tandem, the island is projected to generate up to 3 times its basic energy needs.  Excess power will be used to desalinate water at the island’s three desalination plants, delivering 3 million gallons of fresh water per day.
  • The Clinton Global Initiative has a specific Diesel Replacement Program for islands, focused on deploying renewable energy projects and strategies tailored to the unique needs of its 20 island government partners.  The objective is not only to create cost-effective solutions to reduce carbon, but also to help many of these island nations reduce the often enormous debt that results from relying on imported diesel fuel for electricity.

There are many more opportunities, including Crete, Madeira, Bonaire, La Reunion, the U.S Virgin Islands, and the Philippines (7,127 islands) – which last summer set a 100% renewable energy target within 10 years.

Not all of these projects, particularly the more sophisticated ones, have gone smoothly.  The logistical challenges of island construction add to the overall cost of the projects.  The risk of extreme tropical weather events is always present, including the risk of actually being underwater if sea levels rise as anticipated.  Thus far, financing for many of these projects has come from public-private partnerships, and as I’ve written previously, the coming avalanche of adaptation funding means those avenues are expected to be around for the foreseeable future.  But given the strong economic arguments for residential systems, resorts, agriculture, and other energy-intensive applications that often rely on diesel power for electricity, onsite distributed projects often pencil out without public assistance.

 

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