Navigant Research Blog

Even My Grandma Has a Smart Home!

— January 25, 2018

There are all kinds of barriers to smart home adoption. People ask me all the time, “what do you use your Alexa for?” Unconvinced by existing value propositions, many consumers figure they need not bother with smart technology.

Smart Home Imperfections

Admittedly, for all the promise about how smart these products are and how they will change our lives, often they are not that smart and they fail to meet expectations. The countless times I have asked my Echo device a simple question, only to have Alexa respond with “Sorry, I don’t know that,” drives even the earliest of adopters to the brink. And that’s not even going into the issues surrounding installation, troubleshooting, interoperability, and cost. It makes many wonder, why all the fuss?

Smart Features Offer Ease

Despite all the reasons people find not to adopt smart home products, I have found a convincing case for even the biggest skeptic. I recently discovered my grandma has a smart home.

My grandma is no early tech adopter—she is 80 and her favorite hobby is quilting—and yet, she has a Google Home, a Nest Cam, three Philips Hue light bulbs, several ConnectSense smart outlets, and an iPad or iPhone to control them all, which is a more robust smart home ecosystem compared to what most people have—including me. Every evening when it starts to get dark, she uses her smartphone to turn on lamps, instead of having to bend over and switch them on. When she retires for the evening, she asks Google Assistant to turn her Hue bulbs on, instead of having to fumble around in the dark for a light switch. She doesn’t even notice the Nest Cam perched on her mantel, but it gives my family members piece of mind as they can check on her using their smartphones from wherever they are.

Gifting Smart Tech

There are, of course, a few caveats. My grandma hasn’t purchased any of these products herself. They have all been gifts from family members, which is important for vendors to keep in mind when targeting consumers. When a device malfunctions, she calls upon her children and grandchildren for troubleshooting, which usually involves walking her through an app over the phone or simply restarting a device. Though this works most of the time, smart home tech vendors need to provide maintenance and support to consumers.

My grandma also hasn’t installed any of these devices herself, though they have been plug-and-play enough for younger generations in the family, and many companies are increasingly offering installation services. To top it off, her smart plugs are integrated with Apple HomeKit, but they aren’t integrated with Google Assistant, meaning she can’t control them through voice activation—which highlights a common interoperability problem for most consumers.

If Grandma Can Do It, Anybody Can

While the smart home market has its challenges, there are emerging use cases that are convincing more consumers to embrace the technology. Smart home tech should not be used only by early adopters and younger generations, it should be used by everyone. If my grandma can use smart home products and services, then anyone can, and there is hope for the smart home market yet.

 

Health and Well-Being and IoT in Buildings Provide Congruent Goals

— January 25, 2018

Last year, I attended Greenbuild International Conference and wrote about the focus on occupant health and well-being transforming the commercial buildings market. It was a theme throughout the conference, and seems one that is only now progressing in 2018.

In February, I’ll be attending Strategies in Light in Long Beach, California. While the conference has many education tracks around lighting, one that stands out to me is “Lighting for Health and Well-being.” The other areas that stand out are sessions surrounding the Internet of Things (IoT) and lighting, from creating value to data and analytics to communication protocols and interoperability issues. Navigant Research discussed these themes and the overall market for lighting and IoT in its recent report, IoT for Lighting.

Adding Value in IoT

There is a lot of buzz around IoT, but it is still not clearly defined and the value proposition is often unclear. With more connected devices more data is available, but what is being done with the data? A clear value proposition is needed.

One of the key parts of Navigant Research’s definition of IoT lighting is adding value beyond illumination. Lighting can be seen as the entry point for IoT solutions within commercial buildings due to the granularity of lighting fixtures compared with data points in other building automation systems within a building. Because of this, lighting manufacturers, technology firms, and startups alike are working to create solutions to add value beyond illumination.

The Value of Health and Well-Being

Like IoT and lighting, there are various definitions of what it means to create a healthy building. Definitions include different aspects based on building materials, sustainability, and energy use. Emerging as a theme for healthy buildings are factors like occupant health and productivity. An occupant’s health and productivity are harder to quantify than energy savings. This can be a barrier for building owners and managers and companies looking to prioritize occupant health and well-being, even though there is a growing interest in doing so. While energy savings help to justify the cost of a lighting upgrade, with the growth of LEDs that is no longer something by which companies can differentiate themselves. Some companies believe human-centric lighting—lighting that can improve occupant’s well-being and productivity—is primed to overtake energy savings as a key differentiator in lighting design for buildings.

Competing or Complementary Goals?

Although these lighting education concentrations at Strategies in Light are separate education tracks, I believe they provide more of a complementary focus for the lighting market than a competing one. Increased connected devices through IoT allow for further data collection and analytics that can be used to help quantify the value of occupant comfort and health in conjunction with increased productivity or retail revenue. Providing increased occupant health and comfort can provide additional value and help create a clear value proposition for IoT solutions in buildings.

I’m looking forward to attending sessions in both areas at Strategies in Light and hopefully solidify my views of their complementary aspects. For more information on healthy buildings and the role of lighting, keep an eye out for the upcoming Navigant Research report, Lighting for Healthy Buildings.

 

CES 2018: The Year of Behind-the-Scenes Innovation

— January 23, 2018

A year ago at CES, the event belonged to Amazon’s Alexa, with vendors touting Alexa integrations and displaying Echo devices prominently at their respective booths. At CES 2018, however, a single showstopper failed to materialize—unless one includes the power outage at the Las Vegas Convention Center, which was the biggest surprise (and I was there). In lieu of one standout product, I noted several key trends, including the ever-popular artificial intelligence (AI), a growing number of home healthcare offerings, an aggressive push from Google, and an expanding presence of French startups.

Everybody Is Doing AI

This year, much of the innovation is taking place in the backend software of smart products: the AI world. Nearly every company I spoke with flaunted the use of deep learning and AI. While the term AI was used loosely to describe algorithms and machine learning, this behind-the-scenes technology is progressing, which enables more advanced functionality for smart products. There are new and better algorithms, such as those used in Philips’ Hue Sync, which enables multiple connected lights to respond in sync to movies, video games, and music in real time. Advancements in machine learning are enabling digital assistants to recognize the voices of individual people and understand conversational context.

Home Healthcare Edges its Way into the Spotlight

Home healthcare continues to edge its way into more connected products, and this was underscored as I made my way around the crowded show floors. Offerings varied from elderly care solutions, to products for promoting better sleep, to services for people to better connect with their doctors. While propositions such as security, energy, and convenience are largely driving smart home adoption, healthcare solutions can provide enhanced value on a more personal or familial level. Health-focused products can help users better track their own health or the health of loved ones, and can help prevent unexpected illnesses and diseases.

Google Starts Taking CES and the Smart Home Seriously

Google’s presence was everywhere at CES 2018. The search giant’s messaging took over the Monorail, the Aria hotel’s display featured “Hey, Google” ads, and a giant Google gumball-style machine dispensed Homes and Minis to lucky CES attendees. Amazon took a lighter approach by booking ballrooms dedicated to business meetings with various Amazon business groups, including Alexa. This increased presence not only shows that these two companies are taking their engagement in the smart home market more seriously, but it also highlights the absence of Apple. Apple is being left behind in the smart home space, especially with the delay of its HomePod speaker and a continuous lack of traction with HomeKit.

The French Are Innovating

France’s efforts to become the startup capital of Europe were made obvious at CES by the sheer number of French startups present during CES 2018. From companies demonstrating software for making bathroom mirrors smart to Li-Fi-based IoT platform providers, the French are innovating and becoming a hotbed of opportunity for stakeholders across smart industries.

A World in Transition

Though CES 2018 did not have one major theme like that of past shows, the trends I observed fell in line with the progression of digitization that Navigant Research is seeing. Companies are transitioning from deploying hardware devices to enhancing their existing solutions through data and backend software. Large tech incumbents are recognizing the power of the smart home and investing heavily. New value propositions for this tech are emerging and providing more convincing use cases for consumers; new markets are growing from this opportunity. To learn more about these trends, see Navigant Research’s white paper on IoT and the Future of Networked Energy.

 

Look to Islands to Teach Us More about IoT

— January 16, 2018

Islands play an important role in the energy sector, and in other sectors. The Hawaiian Islands, for instance, have been a test bed for new technologies at scale, such as rooftop solar and energy storage systems, led by the Hawaiian Electric Company. The concept of islanding, where a distributed energy resource continues to provide power to a location that goes off the grid, has gained stature through the deployment of microgrids. And in the Internet of Things (IoT) realm, both Spain’s Balearic Islands and New Zealand have recently entered the picture as laboratories for IoT technologies.

Case Study: Balearic Islands

Officials in the Balearic Islands are promoting a system involving half a million sensors that will blanket the islands as part of a broad IoT project. The plans call for 50 IoT antennas that can support at least 50,000 sensors. The underlying network infrastructure is based on the emerging LoRa technology, a low power wireless standard for wide area networks that is well-suited for IoT applications.

Several applications for this IoT network are under discussion, from helping tourists identify uncrowded beaches to helping the elderly avoid getting lost. One of the pilot projects uses the network to monitor the availability of some 1,200 parking spaces in a lot at the Balearic Technology Innovation Park.

The Balearic experiment has attracted the attention of Google, which has supplied the local government with its own IoT platform. The online search giant has also brought in its partner Beeva, a Spanish consultancy, to help steer another pilot project that aims to optimize the use of boat moorings in the city of Pollença’s harbor.

Case Study: New Zealand

In New Zealand, similar efforts are underway in that island nation. Telecom carrier Spark is building its own LoRa IoT network, with plans to cover 70% of the population by the middle of 2018. Officials there envision the new network will support connectivity for traffic lights, waterways, and machinery. And they expect to provide such services at lower costs compared to existing infrastructure.

Will these new, island-tested IoT networks prove to be trend-setters? Perhaps. But there are competing IoT network technologies, of course—such as 5G, which has many people in the energy and automotive sectors excited about what it offers (see Navigant Research’s 5G and the Internet of Energy report for some details). No matter how these IoT networks turn out, it pays to keep an eye on the latest advances so one does not get stuck on a technology island.

 

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