Navigant Research Blog

Stop and Smell the Market Indicators

— May 17, 2018

Last month, Philips Lighting revealed its new Philips GreenPower LED toplighting with a light spectrum optimized for cut rose cultivation. The toplighting technology allows growers to increase light levels year-round without increasing heat, which allows for increased yield production. However, the rose market has advanced in recent years to the point that growers are now more concerned with quality of production. Addressing those concerns along with energy efficiency needs, Philips collaborated with research institutes to provide growers with a toplighting spectrum that improves the quality of the roses and is 40% more energy efficient compared to high pressure sodium lighting. While the technology is important for horticulturalists and agriculture research globally, why would a lighting manufacturing giant like Philips focus on grow solutions for roses? The answer is twofold.

The Wall Street of Flowers

The Netherlands is the trade capital of the global rose market and home to the world’s largest flower market, Royal FloraHolland. Every day, 30 million plants and flowers from all over the world are auctioned at Royal FloraHolland, with operations covering over 14 million square feet—equivalent to 243 football fields. Almost half the world’s flowers and plants pass through one of the 11 cooperatively-run regional flower auctions, with buyers and sellers bidding on trading floors just like a typical stock exchange in financial markets. The sheer scale of this market alone gives reason to why manufacturers would want to specialize in lighting solutions for rose cultivation. Yet bidding wars at Royal FloraHolland are just the beginning.

More Competition, More Opportunities

Developing countries in Africa are starting to take up a larger share of the European market for cut flowers and foliage. The CBI Ministry of Foreign Affairs reports that major suppliers Kenya, Ecuador, Ethiopia, and Colombia have seen a 20%-60% growth in exports of flowers and foliage to Europe. Producers in these regions are strengthening their position in global production and trade, mainly due to favorable growing circumstances, rising demand for competitively priced flowers in Europe, and improved transportation. To remain competitive, European growers are looking to advanced lighting solutions for delivering quality, reliability, and consistency in supply. This is why major lighting manufacturers like Philips and OSRAM have noticed and are taking stock in this burgeoning market. Companies may want to tap into this blossoming market as investment opportunities and demand for unique lighting solutions continue to grow out of this competitive space.

For more details, a recent report from Navigant Research, LED Lighting for Horticultural Applications, examines the global market potential for horticultural lighting.

 

The Evolving Smart Home

— February 6, 2018

The growth of the Internet of Things is continually expanding the number of connected devices in our homes, offices, retail stores, and healthcare facilities, to name a few. According to Navigant Research’s recent report, The Smart Home, global smart home platform revenue is expected to increase from $4.2 billion in 2017 to $39.5 billion in 2026. This significant increase in revenue makes it clear the smart home is here to stay. With the smart home on the rise, what is the real added value these solutions offer to consumers?

Do Smart Solutions Provide Enough Value?

When you think of the smart home, it’s not uncommon to first picture Amazon’s Alexa-enabled voice activated devices, which allow users to play music, listen to the news, receive weather updates, and control compatible devices like a Philips Hue smart bulb all through voice. While devices like smart bulbs do provide additional benefits outside of voice control—such as dimming, color changing, and reducing energy use—how much additional value are these solutions really providing? Philips Lighting recently announced new software features that will sync Philips Hue lighting with gaming, movie, and music content. While this update does include additional features, how much value is this really adding? Is it helping to carry the smart home market forward? Is voice control, dimming, syncing with video games and movies, and energy savings enough? I would argue no. The added convenience of voice control and color-changing or dimming features through devices like smart bulbs do not provide enough of an advantage over more traditional products, like LEDs, for many consumers to justify paying the additional costs. The concept of voice control and changing the color of lighting through a mobile app are novel ideas that provide enough of a wow factor to intrigue consumers, but these features are not enough to carry the momentum of the smart home into the future.

Security as a Value Proposition for the Smart Home

Smart home vendors realize the need to provide additional value propositions for their products to appeal to the mass market and increase adoption of smart solutions. One of the top key trends expected in 2018 by Consumer Reports for the smart home industry is security. To be sure, this is not the only trend of the smart home this year; others range from additional connected devices to increased artificial intelligence to home healthcare, covered in a recent Navigant Research blog. Many of the trends anticipated for 2018 are about providing additional value to consumers for smart home solutions.

The desire for security is a universally shared need and one the smart home market can capitalize on. A recent example of this is Ring, a smart video doorbell company, acquiring Mr Beams, an LED lighting company offering indoor and outdoor LED fixtures. As a result of Ring’s first acquisition, the company launched a line of outdoor security lights. The new line includes pathway lights, step lights, and spotlights that will work jointly with Ring’s security cameras and doorbells. This acquisition not only highlights the growing significance of security as a use case driving progress in the smart home market, but also the importance of providing additional value to smart home products. Lighting integrated with security systems are a natural fit that can better highlight the value of smart home solutions for consumers than features like voice activation and remote control, and more logical partnerships will emerge. Security is just one example of a use case that can transform the smart home from providing additional convenience and a novelty features to a becoming a necessity for consumers.

 

Health and Well-Being and IoT in Buildings Provide Congruent Goals

— January 25, 2018

Last year, I attended Greenbuild International Conference and wrote about the focus on occupant health and well-being transforming the commercial buildings market. It was a theme throughout the conference, and seems one that is only now progressing in 2018.

In February, I’ll be attending Strategies in Light in Long Beach, California. While the conference has many education tracks around lighting, one that stands out to me is “Lighting for Health and Well-being.” The other areas that stand out are sessions surrounding the Internet of Things (IoT) and lighting, from creating value to data and analytics to communication protocols and interoperability issues. Navigant Research discussed these themes and the overall market for lighting and IoT in its recent report, IoT for Lighting.

Adding Value in IoT

There is a lot of buzz around IoT, but it is still not clearly defined and the value proposition is often unclear. With more connected devices more data is available, but what is being done with the data? A clear value proposition is needed.

One of the key parts of Navigant Research’s definition of IoT lighting is adding value beyond illumination. Lighting can be seen as the entry point for IoT solutions within commercial buildings due to the granularity of lighting fixtures compared with data points in other building automation systems within a building. Because of this, lighting manufacturers, technology firms, and startups alike are working to create solutions to add value beyond illumination.

The Value of Health and Well-Being

Like IoT and lighting, there are various definitions of what it means to create a healthy building. Definitions include different aspects based on building materials, sustainability, and energy use. Emerging as a theme for healthy buildings are factors like occupant health and productivity. An occupant’s health and productivity are harder to quantify than energy savings. This can be a barrier for building owners and managers and companies looking to prioritize occupant health and well-being, even though there is a growing interest in doing so. While energy savings help to justify the cost of a lighting upgrade, with the growth of LEDs that is no longer something by which companies can differentiate themselves. Some companies believe human-centric lighting—lighting that can improve occupant’s well-being and productivity—is primed to overtake energy savings as a key differentiator in lighting design for buildings.

Competing or Complementary Goals?

Although these lighting education concentrations at Strategies in Light are separate education tracks, I believe they provide more of a complementary focus for the lighting market than a competing one. Increased connected devices through IoT allow for further data collection and analytics that can be used to help quantify the value of occupant comfort and health in conjunction with increased productivity or retail revenue. Providing increased occupant health and comfort can provide additional value and help create a clear value proposition for IoT solutions in buildings.

I’m looking forward to attending sessions in both areas at Strategies in Light and hopefully solidify my views of their complementary aspects. For more information on healthy buildings and the role of lighting, keep an eye out for the upcoming Navigant Research report, Lighting for Healthy Buildings.

 

Focus on Occupant Health and Well-Being Is Transforming the Commercial Buildings Market

— October 25, 2017

There has been growing interest and demand for occupant health and well-being in commercial buildings. Historically, occupant health policy was more limited and focused on preventing accidents and exposure to hazardous materials. In recent years, there has been a shift from the minimal safety requirements to improved health, increased productivity and performance, and enhanced occupant comfort.

Occupant health and well-being is a notable theme. The focus of the Greenbuild International Conference and Expo this November is human health. Educational sessions covering this area range from The Wellness/Energy Nexus – a Case for Effective Design (WELL Specific) to From Lab to Workplace: Research Advancing Health & Wellbeing.

Based on the human health educational track at the conference, it is clear that conference organizers and speakers alike view this as an essential building trend. It is a trend observed at Navigant Research and discussed as a driver in the upcoming report IoT for Lighting. I’m looking forward to attending Greenbuild to further explore this trend and learn about efforts to promote health and well-being through lighting and building technologies.

Motivation for Human Health in Buildings

A report from the US Green Building Council’s (USGBC) 2013 Summit on Green Building & Human Health is titled Health is a Human Right. Green Building Can Help. While much in the development of green buildings and occupant health and well-being has progressed since 2013, the notion that health is a human right has not.

The trend to focus on human health and well-being within buildings can largely be attributed to attracting and maintaining talent in office workplaces, incentivizing students or shoppers to build environments that focus on their health. Many green building features, such as energy efficient lighting paired with more sophisticated controls, provide motivation via energy savings in addition to improving the health of building occupants. Beyond lighting, occupant health and well-being can be prioritized through improved indoor air quality, thermal comfort, and sound quality.

Promotion of WELL-Being through Standards and Certifications

Founded in 2013, the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI) is a public benefit organization driving the promotion of health and well-being in buildings. The WELL Building Standard, launched in 2014, is based on medical research that analyzes the connection between environmental health, behavioral factors, health outcomes, and demographic risk factors that affect health with the built environment. The WELL Standard covers seven core concepts (air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind) to create a flexible building standard.

Currently, there are pilot programs in progress across various areas, including multi-family residential buildings, education facilities, retail buildings, restaurants, and commercial kitchens. The aim of the pilot programs is to test and refine how WELL can best apply to different building and space types. The standard continues to evolve based on new evidence, and to incorporate new technologies. A WELL certification is a declaration of that building’s commitment to the prioritization of its inhabitants.

Certifications Setting an Example

The USGBC has incorporated the Integrative Process for Health Promotion in the LEED certification for new construction. Participants can earn credit by beginning in the pre-design phase to “achieve synergies that promote health across disciplines and building systems.” They can also work with a public health partner to help determine how to promote health and accomplish related sustainability goals.

While the USGBC and IWBI are not required across buildings and are voluntary certifications, the significance they place on human health in buildings is helping to promote these values and drive increased focus on these trends. These organizations can provide tools and resources for building owners and managers and can help drive the adoption of building elements focused on the health and well-being of building occupants.

 

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