Navigant Research Blog

Challenges of Partnerships and Acquisitions in the IoT Lighting Market

— April 10, 2018

The commercial lighting market has new and expanded technology solution offerings that are helping to address customer pain points through new use cases. Lighting manufacturers and technology companies providing Internet of Things (IoT) solutions are focusing on optimizing space utilization, enhancing retail customers’ shopping experience, asset tracking to improve operational efficiencies, and providing energy management and visualization features to analyze building system data. Vendors have expanded their offerings through internal growth and acquisitions. As the industry is undergoing continual change and advancement, it is expected there will be challenges to overcome for vendors competing in this shifting landscape.

Interoperability and Partnership and Acquisition Integration

Interoperability is a leading challenge faced by the lighting industry. Many systems are proprietary or are a modified version of standards, which creates the same issues as a proprietary system. There are groups working to address this issue, which can provide customers with more options and eliminate the need to select all components from the same vendor.

The IoT lighting market has seen an increased number of acquisitions and partnerships as companies look to expand their solution portfolios and provide a customized solution to the customer. Partnerships and acquisitions require integrating different systems and components, which can be complicated when devices aren’t interoperable. And while the growing number of partnerships within this market have helped alleviate issues surrounding interoperability, problems remain when some components of a system use open communication standards but some devices are not interoperable at the communication level.

Partnerships and Acquisitions That Provide Value

With the growing number of partnerships and acquisitions, it can seem like companies make these moves for the sake of publicity. Partnerships must be strategic to expand the capabilities of a company’s offering. For a company to provide a complete IoT lighting solution portfolio without partnerships is difficult—likely impossible. It is best to allow each company to focus on its own area of expertise, not only to provide an improved offering to its clients, but also to increase business for the companies involved in the partnership. The IoT lighting market is in its infancy, and partnerships are still forming  as companies realize areas within their offerings may need complementing and expanding. There is even more potential to provide customers with customized solutions to address their pain points when partnerships form between multiple companies, as opposed to a siloed system where a company has multiple individual partnerships.

In some cases, a vendor may choose to expand its offerings through an acquisition rather than a partnership or internal growth. Again, there can be challenges with interoperability of new products and solutions. Caution is needed in acquisition integration, and acquiring a company and not integrating them fully can also prove a challenge. If an acquired company remains segregated from the new parent company, it begs the question of why that company was acquired instead of partnered with. Is there a benefit in one method of expansion over another? Currently, companies are showing success in both forms of go-to-market strategies, and it isn’t clear which provides greater success. As the market matures, one avenue of increased solution offerings may become preferred. In the current state of the market, it is apparent that both partnerships and acquisitions provide substantial value—but must be entered upon with caution.

 

Telcos Aggressively Expanding Smart City Services

— December 7, 2017

Among the essential building blocks for the smart cities market are communication networks that connect the sensors, controllers, cameras, and other hardware infrastructure capturing valuable data from the city environment. The need for urban connectivity is creating new opportunities for the telcos responsible for providing public wired or wireless communication services to government, consumers, and businesses. Telcos are increasingly making strategic acquisitions and extending their footprint into solutions and services for smart cities and Internet of Thing (IoT) application areas. Whether through established technology such as 3G/4G or potential disruptors like 5G and narrowband-IoT (NB-IoT), cellular providers are aiming to become the leading suppliers of connectivity for smart cities.

Significant Acquisitions and Service Offerings in North America

In recent years, a number of telcos have made bold expansions into the smart cities market. Verizon, for example, has been working to expand its presence in that industry. It made a major move to extend its footprint with the acquisition of smart street lighting and sensor network provider Sensity Systems in late 2016. Verizon is supporting a wide range of smart city applications, including transportation, public safety, city management, and smart buildings.

AT&T has also significantly increased its visibility in the market since its initial smart cities launch in 2015—notably through its role in the Atlanta and San Diego IoT platform deployment projects. It is supplying Bluetooth and Wi-Fi for short-range connectivity, plus fiber and LTE for backhaul to the cloud.

In early 2017, AT&T obtained exclusive rights to distribute the sensor nodes from Current powered by GE through a reseller agreement in the US and Mexico. AT&T will be the commercial lead on future smart cities projects, with Current as its technology provider.

Significant Global Acquisitions and Offerings

Telefónica, the Spanish-based global telecom provider, has also been targeting smart city opportunities. It was lead commercial partner in the SmartSantander project, which involved deployment of over 20,000 devices in Santander and the surrounding area (including sensors, repeaters, gateways, etc.).

French carrier and service provider Orange is leveraging its expertise in 4G, fiber, LoRa, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth to install a network of connected sensors for Romania’s Alba Lulia Smart City 2018 project. Telefónica and Orange Group are key players in the development of FIWARE standards—an open source initiative that aims to establish a standard for smart cities based on the FIWARE platform.

Most recently, Telestra, an Australian telecom company, acquired fleet management systems provider MTData and created a partnership with Melbourne-based Smart Parking. The company has already won contracts to install Smart Parking’s sensors in five Australian council regions.

Telco Expansion Challenges Non-Cellular Connectivity Providers

The aggressive telco expansion into the smart cities market should serve as a warning shot to other providers of urban connectivity such as RF mesh and Wi-Fi players. These providers should quickly move to protect market share by emphasizing their relative advantages over cellular (e.g., private networks, lower operating costs) and developing more vertical solution partnerships and connectivity capabilities.

While most cities are likely to have multiple providers and types of connectivity for different use cases, cellular providers are making a clear push to capture the high bandwidth segment of the smart city communication networks value chain. There is evidence that resistance to public cellular is declining in the utility sector. With the deployment of new cellular technologies such as NB-IoT and 5G on the horizon, the same is likely true for cities.

 

Dell, Others Make Bold Moves in IoT Market

— November 10, 2017

Dell made a splash in the Internet of Things (IoT) market recently, announcing a $1 billion investment over 3 years to set up a new IoT division of the company and to fund new IoT-specific products, labs, and a partner program. The goal is to prod customers into speeding up the deployment of its IoT projects. This move follows a quiet 2-year period during which Dell honed its strategy. Dell’s new IoT division will be helmed by Ray O’Farrell, executive vice president and CTO at VMware.

Dell Is Not Alone

Others are also pushing hard to drive IoT adoption across multiple sectors, including energy, mining, manufacturing, and smart cities, to name but a few. Some of the other recent IoT-related moves include:

  • Apple and General Electric (GE) announced a partnership in mid-October to produce “powerful industrial apps designed to bring predictive data and analytics from Predix, GE’s industrial IoT platform, to iPhone and iPad.” The companies also released a new Predix software development kit for iOS, which developers can use to make their own industrial IoT apps.
  • Germany’s Dialog Semiconductor announced its plans to acquire California-based Silego Technology for as much as $306 million in a move to help Dialog fortify its position in the IoT market.
  • Also in Germany, business software provider Software AG recently said it would form a new IoT cloud unit in January 2018. It also set up a new strategic alliance with a group of manufacturers that will focus on new industrial applications for IoT and Germany’s Industrie 4.0 digitization initiative.
  • In Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, the vice president of the United Arab Emirates and ruler of Dubai, launched an IoT strategy aimed at preserving the emirate’s digital wealth and setting the foundation for a smart lifestyle transformation process for its people.

More of these of investments and strategic moves related to IoT are expected as competition heats up among vendors trying to seize early market momentum and as the trend moves well beyond the hype phase. This should be good news for those companies seeking to leverage IoT technologies for their business processes. Customers should derive benefits as IoT solutions vendors invest more in their products, channeling engineering horsepower into solving complex industrial problems. For a window into what the industrial IoT market could look like over the next decade, see Navigant Research’s report, Industrial Internet of Things.

 

Sunrun: The Large Solar Provider Dilemma

— September 19, 2017

On August 24, Sunrun—the last of the large independent US solar providers—announced an agreement with Comcast, a leading cable provider in the country. The two companies plan to launch a strategic partnership to offer Sunrun’s services to Comcast’s clients.

Sunrun was founded in 2007 and found success innovating new ways to finance residential solar installations such as solar leases and power purchase agreements (PPAs). It created the solar as a service (SOaaS) business model, which became the foundation for the growth of the sector between 2010 and 2015. Until 2014, it seemed that solar leases and PPAs—grouped as third-party ownership in California’s Interconnection Applications Data Set—were going to be the winning business model in the SOaaS industry. These leases allowed large players to both increase the market size and displace local installers.

Changing Solar Market

In 2015, the market share of solar leases and PPAs in California—which itself represents around 60% of the US market—plunged to under 50% from 75% in 2013. Data for 1H 2017 shows third-party ownership at close to 30%.

Third-Party Ownership Market Share, California: 2005-1H 2017

(Sources: Navigant Research; California Distributed Generation Statistics)

The collapse of third-party ownership has weakened large solar providers compared to local installers. Large solar providers relied on their access to cheaper capital backed by significant margins in their leases to run large business development teams and finance the installations. As residential solar customers moved into cash or loan buys, local installers became competitive again, reducing the profit margin per installation in the industry. This left large solar providers like Sunrun with high customer acquisition costs relative to profit per installation.

Under these circumstances, it is not surprising that Sunrun is looking for new and cheaper ways to attract customers. Even if this partnership with Comcast costs Sunrun its independent status, it may be worthwhile if the strategy is successful.

What Is in It for Comcast?

Comcast has shown interest in the energy sector in the past, and its Xfinity Home service includes a smart thermostat as one of the offerings. However, scaling it into a full-fledged energy solution would be costly, as Comcast would need to build a new team from the ground.

For Comcast, this partnership offers a relatively cheap entry into the solar and energy markets in which it can rely on its core skills (customer acquisition and management) without having to invest significantly in a new product. If successful, Comcast can push a more aggressive strategy into the energy sector either through Sunrun or with its own product.

Benefits and Potential

Customers of Comcast and Sunrun could also benefit from this partnership. The companies can put together a convincing solution for home automation by tapping on their offerings on the two main services around home automation—security and energy.

The success of this partnership will depend of Comcast’s ability to cross-sell energy services to its current customer base. Comcast operates in a market with limited competition and high barriers to entry, which is different from the solar market. The sales process of solar is also different from that of cable. Solar is a long-term investment (even leases and PPAs require long-term contracts). Therefore, customers take long before making a final decision and, in some cases, it will require home visits before the deal is closed. This means that Comcast cannot simply add solar to its bundles. It will have to invest in training its sales force if it wants to sell solar services effectively. It won’t be easy, but if Comcast succeeds, it may signal a new era for energy.

 

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