Navigant Research Blog

In Profit Crunch, Oil Firms Look to Big Data

— June 5, 2015

New_Picture_webAs the price of crude continues to fall and the availability of places for oil companies to store oil shrinks, oil and gas companies are looking for ways to reduce costs and preserve profits. Operational efficiency is a familiar path—one that leads to layoffs, up to 75,000 coming at companies big and small as reported by Continental Resources. At the same time, some companies are looking inward to big data as a way to make operations and exploration more efficient. We’ve written about the large potential for big data to make buildings, for example, more efficient. And it’s clear that the value of big data lies in its context.

In the case of oil and gas, it is important to keep in mind how diverse this industry is. The use of data in oil exploration and production is wholly different from its employment in oil refining, distribution, and marketing.

Down the Stream

According to the panel members of a recent Cleantech Forum panel on the digitization of the Oil and Gas industry, there’s scant consensus on data models and formats in single business units, let alone across an entire company or the industry. The spread of digitization is not universal, either. This presents a clear challenge to the industry–data analytics are only useful when the data is consistently collected and, well, analyzed. But it also presents an opportunity. Any company that can figure out how to collect, integrate, and analyze data across the oil and gas stream—from wellhead to gas pump—will be able to unlock the potential of both operational efficiency and optimization. Those gains in efficiency will save money and help the companies achieve their sustainability goals.

A few companies are already testing that promise. WellAware is looking to bring IoT Oil and Gas by providing customers a view into production, conveyance, and processing of petroleum products. The Texas-based firm deploys sensors and gathers data from existing monitors to provide visualizations and analytics on system performance. To compete with OSISoft, an incumbent in oil and gas data collection and historian services, WellAware will provide hardware and advanced analytics—two offerings that OSISoft either does not offer or outsources.

Human Input

A different approach, one based on large time series data analysis, is offered by Mtelligence Corporation and MapR, a provider of the powerful open-source Hadoop solution. Called Mtell Reservoir, the solution will focus on real-time and historical sensor data analysis to provide system managers operational insight. Given the large volume of data gathered in a drilling operation and the time it takes to load and analyze data, an in-stream solution will have great value.

These big data solutions are poised to give oil and gas operators greater intelligence and insight into operations. However, they don’t close the loop on operations, removing the need for people making decisions. This is due in part to the complex nature of drilling through multifaceted substrates and processing materials of varying quality. Production technologies like directional drilling and fracking have changed the oil and gas business and are in part responsible for the current low oil prices. Data analytics may help to stem the profit losses in the near term.

 

Oil-Gas Price Swings Slow New Energy Investment

— February 18, 2015

As I wrote in this blog in 2012 and in 2013, rising volatility in the oil-to-gas ratio points to a substantial shift in market dynamics for clean energy. Even if short-lived, this shift will have substantial implications for investment in new energy technologies.

In recent years, as the price of oil climbed to over $100 a barrel, the oil-to-gas ratio—which compares the price of a barrel of crude oil to that of a million Btu (mmBtu) of natural gas—spiked to as high as 52:1 in a single month from a relative constant of around 10:1. While this apparent equilibrium had held steady since the mid-1980s, the widening gap between the price of oil and that of gas seemed to represent a new reality, with natural gas prices holding below $3 per mmBtu (Henry Hub).

In the last several months, as oil prices have slid to less than $50 per barrel, that ratio has come crashing back down to Earth. At a current 13:1, the oil-to-gas ratio is once again nearing historic levels—and again reshuffling the deck for a cleantech industry yearning for macroeconomic certainty.

Ratio of Crude Oil to Natural Gas: 1990-2015

Oil-Gas

(Source: Navigant Research)

While the boom in shale oil and gas recovery (among other factors) has ushered in an apparent return to historical equilibrium, experts are divided on what the future holds. Some argue that the recent spike in the oil-to-gas ratio was a short-term anomaly and that forces will continue to act to bring prices back into their long run equilibrium. Others question whether a stable long-term relationship between crude oil prices and natural gas prices even existed in the first place.

While the jury is still out on the putative correlation between oil and gas prices, we can expect continued volatility in the oil-to-gas ratio. This creates a challenging environment for new energy technologies going head-to-head with existing infrastructure.

The Incumbent Edge

Volatility dampens growth in new energy technologies in several ways. First, it cools investors’ appetite for clean energy ventures, due to the potential risk that seemingly profitable investments one day may turn out to be unprofitable due to changing fuel costs. Building natural gas infrastructure may look attractive in 2012 if you’re in the United States, for example, but not so wise when the price of a barrel of crude oil drops by more than 50% in 2014. This is an issue of asset stranding.

Second, it lowers customers’ tolerance for risk. As noted in our recently published report, Combined Heat and Power for Commercial Buildings, the impact of price swings are most acutely felt by consumers looking to hedge with one fuel against the other. When oil prices accelerated past $100, consumers of heating oil and gasoline, for example, began looking to natural gas alternatives. These decisions can be straightforward when price signals are stable, but actual (or even perceived) volatility favors a wait-and-see approach.

The Underminer

Third, it undermines the role of incentives and other mechanisms for stimulating the deployment of new energy technologies. Still more expensive than incumbent technology in most cases, clean energy has enjoyed incentives that put emerging energy technologies on an even playing field with fossil fuels. Fuel price volatility can make it especially challenging to establish reasonable incentive levels for the long term.

While Navigant Research’s forecasts for distributed generation technologies like solar PV (see our Global Distributed Generation Deployment Forecast report) and energy storage (see our Community, Residential, and Commercial Energy Storage report) in the United States remain strong despite lower energy prices, volatility is likely to mostly benefit the status quo.

 

With Cheap Oil Flowing, U.S. Looks to Next Energy Revolution

— January 26, 2015

With oil prices continuing to languish and Saudi Arabia moving through a royal succession upon the death of King Abdullah, the idea that the “OPEC era is over” has gained credence among government officials and industry analysts. “Did the United States kill OPEC?” asks New York Times economics reporter Eduardo Porter. The answer, he argues, is essentially yes: “The Nixon administration and Congress laid the foundation of an industrial policy that over the span of four decades developed the technologies needed to unleash American shale oil and natural gas onto world markets,” thus loosening OPEC’s grip.

The reality is a bit more complicated than that: OPEC still produces nearly 40% of the world’s oil; the United States produces less than 18%. And oil at $50 a barrel could actually increase OPEC’s power as producers of unconventional reserves, which are more costly to produce, are driven from the market. Like the coal industry, OPEC is not going anywhere anytime soon.

The Big Opportunity

The shale revolution does, however, offer some other welcome knock-on effects, if policymakers are alert and astute enough to take advantage of them.  “Cheaper oil and gas will contribute an estimated $2,000 per American household this year, and $74 billion to state and federal governments coffers,” note Ted Nordhaus and Michael Shellenberger of the Breakthrough Institute, a San Francisco-based energy and climate think tank. The Breakthrough Institute has done extensive research on the role of public-private partnerships in the development of the seismic and drilling technology advances that underlie the shale revolution. Should the government choose to take advantage of it, this windfall could fund a multi-decade R&D program for renewable energy similar to the one that led to the shale boom.

“We can afford to spend a tiny fraction of the benefits of the bounty that cheap oil and gas have brought so that our children and grandchildren can similarly benefit from cheap and clean energy in the future,” declare Nordhaus and Shellenberger.

The Gas Tax Solution

That’s an inspiring concept. The execution is likely to be messy, though. Any such spending would probably need congressional support, or at least consent – and the U.S. Senate only last week finally reached agreement that “climate change is real and not a hoax.” That’s a long way from dedicating billions to develop alternative energy sources.

One suggestion put forth by clean energy activists is an increase in the U.S. gas tax. A few cents extra per gallon (on gas that’s about half the price it was a year ago) could help fund a massive crash program to develop inexpensive, clean energy technology (not to mention shore up the failing U.S. Highway Trust Fund).

But raising the gas tax is like the National Popular Vote – a terrific idea that’s unlikely to happen in our lifetimes. Even though polls consistently indicate that consumers are willing to spend slightly more for the energy they consume in order to limit climate change, actually slapping extra taxes on motorists at the pump is unlikely to be a winning move in Washington – which explains why President Obama left it out of his call for a “bipartisan infrastructure plan” in his State of the Union address.

 

With Gas Prices Low, EV Drivers Adjust to Timely Price Info

— January 22, 2015

While the falling price of gasoline is welcome news for many drivers, it undercuts the financial argument for driving a plug-in electric vehicle (PEV).  On a per-mile basis, electricity in the United States is between 20% to 35% of the cost of driving a gasoline-powered car, depending on the utility rates and gas taxes.  Avoiding paying $50 or more for a weekly fill-up on gas compared to around $40 per month for charging an EV gives EV drivers financial satisfaction.

Gas has dipped below $2 in some states, and U.S. sales of plug-in hybrids have simultaneously slumped, falling 26% in November 2014 versus a year ago, according to HybridCars.com.  However, EV economics can be further improved by charging off-peak, and recent studies show that not only are significant savings possible, but also that consumers will adjust their charging to take advantage of the lower rates.

Time to Charge

A recent demonstration that provided EV owners with timely information about the cost of electricity and grid health indicates that the cost of charging can be reduced by up to 60% through smart charging.  Customers in the study had access to hourly utility rates through a connection to the Siemens energy cloud, and charging power levels were alternated based on the needs of the grid.  The study was performed by Duke Energy and Siemens and delivered charging information to mobile phones, tablets, and computers, enabling EV drivers to schedule charging based on the anticipated costs given the varying rates at different times of the day.

Siemens delivered electricity rate information via its computing cloud using the OpenADR demand response protocol, which enables energy-consuming devices (including charging stations) to respond to grid conditions.  The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has established many standards for communications between charging stations and EVs; others, including the CEA-2045 modular communications interface standard, enable communications between charging stations with smart meters and home networking devices.

A Bad Connection

Meanwhile, in December, the U.S. Department of Energy published a report summarizing six projects related to EV charging that were funded in 2009 as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  Entitled Evaluating Electric Vehicle Charging Impacts and Customer Charging Behaviors, the report states that when provided with discounted overnight rates for EV charging, consumers will adapt their charging habits.  “Customers took advantage of time-based rates to save on overnight residential charging” when they were able to pre-program charging, according to the report.  Convenience in managing charging is viewed as essential to minimize the cost of EV charging.

The report also points out that work needs to continue on connecting EV chargers with smart grid devices.  The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), which was one of the six utilities managing the projects, found that charging equipment “successfully connected to SMUD meters about 50% of the time for several reasons, including poor ZigBee radio signal quality (often range related), problems with power supply circuits in the EVSE [electric vehicle supply equipment] communications module packet loss recovery, and environmental interference.”

Simplifying and reducing the cost of EV charging is critical to convincing more consumers to opt for EVs over conventional vehicles –  especially when prices at the pump are low.

 

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