Navigant Research Blog

Automated Driving at 2018 CES Is All About Business Models

— January 11, 2018

Ten years to the day after my very first ride in the automated Chevrolet Tahoe that won the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge, I was in Las Vegas yet again for the 2018 International CES. In the very same parking lot where I took my first driverless ride, I climbed into the backseat of a BMW 5 series sedan sporting the logos of Aptiv and Lyft for an automated round trip from the Las Vegas Convention Center to Caesar’s Palace. As has been the case for most of the past decade, automated driving is the main automotive topic at CES, but now it’s more about the business models than the core technology.

For the second year in a row, General Motors (GM), the company that started the automated driving land rush at CES, is not here even in an official capacity. Supplier Aptive and several of the automakers that did return to Vegas have turned their attention to how they are going to transform their business models in the coming years as we make the shift away from buying and driving our own vehicles. Aptiv is just one of several companies—along with Waymo, Ford, GM, and Jaguar Land Rover—that have partnerships with Lyft to deploy automated vehicles.

The Hunt for New Revenue Streams

However, ride-hailing isn’t going to be the only application for automated vehicles in the coming decade. Automakers are keenly aware of the reality that shared, automated mobility will likely mean that there will be far fewer vehicles in the coming decades. With reduced revenues from sales, they are looking to services to generate new revenue streams. Given that, automakers need to maximize the utilization of these vehicles because the number of people in need of rides is hardly consistent during the course of the day.

While many surveys have asked consumers if they want to buy automated vehicles in recent years, it’s really the wrong question. For the most part, consumers will be unlikely to have the opportunity to purchase these vehicles. Instead, they will be owned and operated by manufacturers and other providers and made available on-demand.

Platforms Evolve, Targeting New Applications

The architecture of the vehicle will change from the traditional cars and SUVs we know today to something more flexible that can accommodate everything from passengers to pizzas to packages. Toyota unveiled a concept at CES 2018 called the e-Palette specifically targeted at these multimodal applications. It will be built in three sizes to accommodate different use cases.

Along with the vehicle, Toyota announced the e-Palette alliance to leverage the company’s Mobility Services Platform. Initial partners include Amazon, Didi, Pizza Hut, Mazda, and Uber to work on developing the vehicle, applications, and verification activities.

Ford CEO Jim Hackett also announced several business model initiatives to accompany the bespoke automated vehicle the company is launching in 2021. With its partner Autonomic, Ford is developing a transportation operating system cloud platform that will be available to cities to provide a range of non-competitive services like payments, authentication, and coordination.

On top of that, Ford’s transportation as a service platform will handle the logistics and deployment optimization for partners that want to utilize Ford’s vehicles. A pilot of the system will be launched this year in a city yet to be named along with Dominos, Lyft, and Postmates.

The business of mobility is changing, and the industry is trying out a range of solutions in the hopes of making both itself and the cities it operates in sustainable.

 

Preludes to Premium Mobility Services

— May 22, 2017

Moving toward a world where individual vehicle ownership gives way to automated mobility services, automakers and service providers run the risk that their differentiated products will become commodities. In an industry that already runs relatively thin margins on top of high capital costs, the thought of becoming a commodity is a nightmare scenario. That is why companies like Ford and General Motors (GM) are experimenting with models that could feature different price points and margins.

Differentiation Necessary

If you use one of today’s basic ride-hailing services, it doesn’t matter if you use Lyft, Uber, Gett, or one of the numerous small services that operate regionally. Using luxury tiers like Uber Black gets users a premium vehicle, but otherwise the service is essentially the same and the prices are usually close. In order to charge a premium price that can generate the profits needed to sustain a business, companies will have to find ways to differentiate.

In a world where the car you ride in becomes random, the overall customer experience of the service will become crucial. That may include being able to specify what type of vehicle you want, guaranteed shorter wait times, access to added services like picking up the dry cleaning or groceries, and more.

In January 2017, GM’s Cadillac division launched Book, a service that enables customers to pay a flat monthly fee and get access to any of the vehicles in the brand’s model lineup. A subscriber may opt to spend the week commuting in an XT5 crossover, switch to an ATS-V performance coupe for a weekend jaunt in the country, or get an Escalade for a family road trip. Cadillac takes care of insurance, detailing, and maintenance.

At the New York Auto Show in April 2017, Lincoln announced its Chauffeur service. As the name implies, Lincoln provides its customers with access to a professional driver when owners cannot or don’t want to drive—such as on a special date night or to pick up the kids from an event. Lincoln screens the drivers and they arrive at the customer’s location on request to drive the customer’s car. Lincoln Chauffeur debuted in Miami and is now expanding to San Diego.

An Automated Future

Hypothetically, 5 to 10 years from now when both of these brands (and others) are offering a range of automated vehicles, it’s easy to imagine a scenario where services evolve to take advantage of that automation. The Cadillac of your choice appears at your doorstep on demand; for certain models like the high performance V series, GM can offer the option for the customer to drive if they choose while others may be automated only. Similarly, Lincoln Chauffeur could be utilized with automation for vehicles that customers buy, lease, or subscribe to on a weekly, monthly, or annual basis. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has also articulated a vision where his customers could make their vehicles available for short-term rentals when not being used.

These and other varieties of services will mean dramatic changes for the automotive retail business, as well the automakers and customers. The choice of whether to lease or buy gets expanded into additional types of payment plans, including by the mile, hour, month, and more. The possibilities will be limitless for affluent customers. For example, a customer may not need to decide what color car they want in their garage; they can order one coordinated to their outfit for the evening. No doubt there will be many more experiments from automakers over the next several years as they seek to navigate their way through a changing transportation landscape.

 

Autonomous Ride-Hailing May Hail the New Era of the Minivan

— December 22, 2016

CarsharingIt’s been more than 3 decades since Hal Sperlich and Lee Iacocca redefined the family hauler with the introduction of the minivan. Over the subsequent 20 years, the minivan segment grew to become one of the largest in the US market before being overtaken by SUVs and beginning a long and steady decline. However, as we move into the era of autonomous mobility services, we may also see a resurgence of what had been derided as the “soccer mom-mobile.”

While the minivan market isn’t as big as it once was in total sales volume, as these vehicles have gained useful amenities, they have become quite profitable. Starting in 2016, the companies that have stuck by this body style have begun introducing redesigned vans, including the 2017 Chrysler Pacifica and the 2018 Honda Odyssey that will debut at January’s North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

Vans On Demand

When Google decided it was time to expand its development fleet of self-driving cars, it struck a deal with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) to purchase 100 Pacifica plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEVs) and equip them with its autonomous sensing and control systems. With the self-driving car project now spun out of the X research lab as a separate company called Waymo, it has also announced an agreement with Honda to discuss collaboration on development and possibly commercialization of autonomous technologies. In Navigant Research’s 2015 Autonomous Vehicle OEM Leaderboard Report, Honda was ranked eighth among 18 companies evaluated, so working with Waymo could provide a boost relative to the market leaders.

Since auto industry veteran John Krafcik came on board as CEO of what is now Waymo in October 2015, the program has apparently shifted its focus from developing complete cars to working with existing carmakers to supply its systems as well as potentially building mobility service platforms. As the shape of future mobility services continues to evolve, these platforms are likely to include a broad range of vehicle types to support different needs. One- or two-person pods may be adequate to provide first/last mile transportation in dense urban areas, while something more akin to a minivan can support families or larger groups traveling on a variety of routes that don’t have sufficient density to make mass transit viable.

Ford-owned San Francisco-based startup Chariot is already providing hybrid on-demand services in San Francisco and Austin, Texas with human-driven vans. As autonomous vans become available, they could be deployed in the same way. For these types of transportation services, the easier ingress/egress of a van would be much more practical than climbing up into an SUV.

Growing Trend

Volkswagen will also be joining in on the autonomous van trend at January’s Detroit show. The embattled German automaker will be unveiling a new battery electric micro-bus concept based on the same new modular electric platform that underpins the I.D. concept shown at this year’s Frankfurt Motor Show. FCA will be participating in the 2017 International CES in Las Vegas for the first time and will reportedly show a battery electric version of the Pacifica.

FCA’s program with Waymo only extended as far integrating autonomous hardware into the minivan and does not include system development. However, as one of the companies in the back half of the pack in the Leaderboard rankings, FCA would also be a good candidate to adopt a production autonomous package from Waymo or one of the larger Tier One suppliers such as Delphi or Continental. We’ll probably be seeing a lot more self-driving minivans in the coming decade.

 

Early Chevrolet Bolts in the Lyft Fleet Could Be Great Marketing Move

— August 16, 2016

Electric Vehicle 2For several months now, pre-production Chevrolet Bolt EVs have been rolling off General Motors’ (GM’s) Orion, Michigan assembly line, and the car is now only about 2 months from being ready for paying customers. However, many of the early Bolts won’t actually be going to retail customers. Instead, they will be offered up to Lyft drivers through the Express Drive rental program.

A Different Model

Given the way Tesla managed to rack up more than 373,000 pre-orders for its Model 3 at $1,000 each, one might wonder why GM isn’t taking a similar approach with the first affordable 200-mile electric car. Unlike the Silicon Valley upstart, GM cannot sell cars directly to consumers but must instead go through its franchised dealer network, so a similar pre-order process would be vastly more complicated, if not impossible.

Even if GM could execute such a program, it’s not at all clear it would work. Tesla and its CEO Elon Musk have built up a remarkable brand in less than a decade, and many of the pre-orders are coming from consumers that want to buy into that brand, just as they buy into Apple when they choose an iPhone over a comparable Android or Windows phone. For many very valid reasons, GM still isn’t taken seriously by many people when it comes to selling EVs, despite the positive reviews garnered by the Chevrolet Volt and Spark EVs.

GM does have a significant time advantage over Tesla and other automakers with the Bolt, and it appears to want to use that wisely with a different sort of marketing approach. Since modern plug-in EVs (PEVs) began hitting the streets 6 years ago, word of mouth and first-hand experience have proven to be very effective means of winning customers. When people actually experience a PEV, they are much more inclined to purchase one.

First-Hand Experience

Getting people to ride in Bolts with Lyft drivers has the potential to provide positive first-hand exposure without having to go to a dealer first. When a customer goes into a showroom having already decided they want to buy a Bolt, they are much more likely to get one. Unfortunately, up until now, many traditional car dealers have tended to steer customers away from EVs and toward more profitable vehicles that they understand better like utility vehicles and trucks. That’s exactly why Tesla insists on selling direct to consumers through company-owned stores, which is not an option for GM or other incumbent OEMs.

If GM can sell consumers on the Bolt before they ever get to the dealership, they may have a much better chance of early success. The mandates to sell zero-emissions vehicles in California and other states will start to ramp up significantly from 2018 onward and the competition will be getting much tougher with the debut of the Model 3; the next-generation Nissan LEAF; and 200-mile EVs from Ford, Hyundai, and others expected.

Navigant Research’s Electric Vehicle Market Forecasts projects global PEV sales of approximately 2.9 million in 2024 with 462,000 in the United States. Through the first 7 months of 2016, Americans have purchased almost 78,500 PEVs, an increase of 20% over the same period in 2015. While Tesla’s financial stability remains very much in question in the coming years as it rapidly scales its production volumes, the company has demonstrated that it is a force to be reckoned with among consumers. GM and the other incumbent OEMs will have to get creative with ideas like the Bolt/Lyft rental program if they are going to both comply with regulatory mandates and maintain or grow their overall sales.

 

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