Navigant Research Blog

Automation Gives Manufacturers an Energy Boost

— October 17, 2014

According to the U.S. Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index, a measure developed by financial research firm Markit, manufacturing activity in the United States in September reached its highest point in more than 4 years.  Factory employment, though still well below pre-2008 levels, reached its highest level since March 2012.

U.S. manufacturers are getting a boost from low energy costs, driven primarily by the bonanza of low-cost natural gas (and, to a lesser extent, by distributed renewables, often onsite at plants).  But what’s going on inside U.S. plants is equally important.  Increased energy efficiency, enabled by a revolution in process automation technology, is also helping U.S. manufacturers compete with manufacturers that enjoy low-cost labor in developing countries, particularly China.

Excess No Longer Success

Since peaking around 1999, the primary energy use in the U.S. manufacturing sector has declined steadily, according to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, from about 35 quadrillion BTUs annually to less than 31 quads.  Energy intensity – the BTUs used per dollar value of shipments – has declined even more dramatically.

The shift is coming as a shock to old-line factory managers unused to calculating energy as a key metric of efficiency and productivity.  “No one ever got fired for purchasing a pump or a machine that’s too big for the job,” said Fred Discenzo, manager of R&D at Rockwell Automation, at a recent energy management conference in Akron, Ohio.  In manufacturing, “excess capacity has always been the safe option.”

Rockwell is among an emerging segment of technology vendors that is trying to change that, through what it calls “the connected enterprise.”  What that means is connecting the factory floor to the C-suite with far greater visibility and immediacy than before.  Another name for this change might be “extreme granularity.”  In the near future, energy use will be measured not at the factory or line or machine level, but at the individual process level, per unit of production: how much energy did it take to make this widget or valve or bag of ice, and where in the process can that energy use be optimized?

The Next Revolution

Advances in factory-floor networks, wireless sensors, virtualization, and monitoring equipment are enabling these improvements in manufacturing efficiency, energy conservation, and quality control.  These twinned revolutions – cleaner, cheaper, more distributed energy coming into the plant and sophisticated automation technology reducing energy intensity inside the plant – will result in changes that have far-reaching implications for the manufacturing sector, and for the economy.  “The new era of manufacturing will be marked by highly agile, networked enterprises that use information and analytics as skillfully as they employ talent and machinery to deliver products and services to diverse global markets,” concluded a 2012 McKinsey study entitled Manufacturing the Future.

At 32% of total energy consumption, industry uses more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy.  Manufacturers that adapt to the new realities of energy, by changing the ways in which they source and use electricity, will be more competitive on the global stage – and could help usher in the new economic upswing that politicians and analysts have been dreaming of for years.

 

Cities Are Making the Energy Cloud a Reality

— October 12, 2014

The possibilities for procuring and distributing clean, low-cost electricity offer challenges to cities and utilities – but also opportunities to forge new relationships and lay the foundations for cities that are clean and efficient in their energy use.

I’ve written previously about the close relationship between smart cities and smart grids.  Early projects have largely been driven by utility programs for the piloting and demonstration of smart grid technologies and to gather intelligence on consumer and business responses to energy management programs.

The challenge is to integrate the lessons learned from these projects into broader smart city programs.  Cities have played a role in these pilots but have largely been supporters of utility-driven technology programs.  This is changing as cities develop more extensive energy management strategies of their own.  Boston, for example, is working closely with its local utilities (National Grid and NSTAR) to reduce its $50 million-plus energy costs and meet the goal set in 2007 to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 25% by 2020 and 80% by 2050.   The city is targeting energy consumption across residential and commercial properties.  Other initiatives include the introduction of an energy management system for Boston’s public buildings and the deployment of LED street lighting.

New Collaborations

Minneapolis is going further.  The city is using the renegotiation of its franchise relationship with its utilities (which governs their access and use of city resources such as roadways and buildings) to establish a new form of collaboration that it believes can be a model for the rest of the United States.  The proposed Clean Energy Partnership between Minneapolis and its electricity and gas suppliers, Xcel Energy and CenterPoint Energy, will create a new body focused on helping the city meets its climate action goals of reducing GHG emissions 15% by 2015 and 30% by 2025 based on a 2006 baseline.

The increasing focus of city leaders on energy efficiency, reduced GHG emissions, and the development of a more resilient infrastructure requires close partnership with utilities.   Cities like Boston and Minneapolis are pushing their utilities to help them meet their commitments, but the cities themselves are also taking a more active role.  The Greater London Authority (GLA), for example, has become the first local government authority in the United Kingdom to be licensed as a “junior” energy supplier.  This enables London to buy power from small generators and sell it to other public bodies at an attractive rate.   The city expects to be buying and selling power by early 2015, and it hopes to reduce energy costs for London while also boosting the local renewable energy industry.

A Vision Emerges

The emerging energy vision for smart cities integrates large- and small-scale energy initiatives: from improvements in national infrastructure through citywide increases in efficiency to expanded local energy generation.  Cities will thus become clusters of smart energy communities that can exploit the benefits of the new energy systems, such as distributed generation, dynamic load management, and active market participation.

This synergy presents an excellent example of the opportunities and challenges presented to utilities by the emergence of the energy cloud.  Utilities need to see cities as more than demonstration sites for technology.  Cities are ideal partners for developing the new relationships and the new services core to that energy cloud vision.

These issues are explored further in a new Navigant Research white paper, Smart Cities and the Energy Cloud.  I will also be discussing these developments in my presentation on Smart Cities at Korea Smart Grid Week in October and at European Utility Week in November.

 

Building Automation Shifts to Integrated Controls

— October 12, 2014

Building automation system (BAS) controls have long acted as a cash cow for vendors.  Historically, they were built on closed, proprietary communications protocols, virtually guaranteeing steady revenue from future maintenance and upgrades.  Now, though, customers are migrating to control systems with open protocols, such as BACnet and LonWorks, to gain greater flexibility and interoperability.  The emergence of these standards is changing the landscape of building controls.

The shift to open protocols largely benefits building owners (and has unsurprisingly been driven by the demand of building owners).  Competition is increased, as all vendors are on equal footing, which drives down prices.  Naturally, controls vendors are now exploring alternatives to gain a competitive advantage and regain steady revenue.  One emerging strategy is integrating more intelligence and more controls into HVAC equipment.  Even though more vendors can compete with open systems, the more intelligence that is shipped with HVAC equipment, the less there is available for controls companies to install, thereby protecting revenue from the increased competition.

Rapid Adaptation

Johnson Controls seems to be adapting to the changing environment rapidly.  The company made two important announcements in September.  First, it is reorganizing its building efficiency business to separate the North America branch from the global products business.  This will enable the company to focus on high-margin HVAC product lines, notably air distribution and ventilation solutions and variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems.  The second announcement signaled plans to divest Johnson Controls’ Global Workplace Solutions business.

As I noted after Johnson Controls’ acquisition of Air Distribution Technologies, the move was not about products but about controls.  Johnson Controls’ joint venture with Hitachi to provide VRF systems follows the same strategy.  VRF systems represent lower potential revenue for controls suppliers because controls are typically provided by the equipment manufacturer.  Moreover, because VRF systems use refrigerant as the heat transfer medium instead of air, the need for complex air-side control of supply air temperature and humidity is obviated.  By shifting its focus to HVAC products, Johnson Controls is ensuring that its controls stay relevant.

 

The NFL Tackles Energy Efficiency

— October 12, 2014

On September 14, the San Francisco 49ers played the first game at their new home, Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California.  Though it has its detractors, the new stadium is one of the most energy efficient sports venues in the world.  The 49ers partnered with clean energy leader NRG Energy to install a 375 kW solar power system across the stadium.  The installation will generate enough electricity annually to offset the power consumed during all home games.

In addition to onsite power generation, the stadium has installed low-flow water fixtures in all bathrooms, and water is reclaimed whenever possible to be reused for irrigation and other purposes.  A 27,000 SF green roof provides extra insulation and reduces the demand for heating and cooling.  Whenever possible, the builders used recycled and reclaimed materials during construction.  All of these features have led to Levi’s Stadium being the first U.S. professional football stadium to achieve LEED Gold certification.

Efficient Competition

Unfortunately for San Francisco fans, the 49ers lost their opening home game to another team that has made a commitment to sustainability.  The Chicago Bears completed a full renovation of the iconic Soldier Field in 2003, making it a goal to improve performance and efficiency while also reducing the stadium’s carbon footprint.  These efforts also earned recognition from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) in the form of a LEED – Existing Building Certification.  Although Soldier Field does not have any onsite renewable power generation, it does boast many energy saving features, such as LED lighting with a networked control system and a green roof on the parking structure.

Given their very high energy usage, many other stadiums around the world have implemented efficiency features.  The most popular are efficient lighting/control systems and low-flow water fixtures.  More capital-intensive projects to install renewable power generation on stadiums are also becoming common.  Lincoln Financial Field, home of the Philadelphia Eagles, has the ability to generate 3,000 kW of renewable electricity onsite, the most of any stadium.  Eleven thousand solar panels have been installed, along with 14 eye-catching vertical axis wind turbines, which are intended to be a visual representation of the team’s commitment to sustainability.  FedEx Field outside of Washington, D.C. and MetLife Stadium in New Jersey boast 2,000 kW and 314 kW of generating capacity, respectively.

Power Houses

Two other highly efficient stadiums belong to two of the league’s top teams.  The Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots are both powerhouse teams, likely to meet in this season’s Super Bowl in Arizona.  Seattle’s CenturyLink Field produces 830,000 kWh annually with an onsite solar installation.  The Patriots’ home field in Foxborough, Massachusetts also features solar power generation, a 525 kW array installed by NRG Energy.  One of the distinctive features of this stadium is an integrated building energy management system that optimizes HVAC, lighting, and other systems.

Sports teams have a unique ability to influence their home communities in positive ways; their visible commitments to sustainability tend to have ripple effects throughout the community.  Energy efficient stadiums support local green businesses that are able to put their expertise on display in large-scale projects.  Saving energy and money and helping fans understand the impacts of their actions is a win for everyone.

 

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