Navigant Research Blog

Smart Cities: It’s All Relative

— July 29, 2015

Cities around the world are increasingly adopting technologies to improve the quality of life in the modern city, where traffic congestion, air pollution, and a lack of mobility are often the norm. Many smart city technologies are also being developed to deal with specific issues in energy distribution, energy and water management, transportation optimization, and public safety and security. Navigant Research defines a smart city as the integration of technology into a strategic approach to sustainability, citizen well-being, and economic development.

Currently, the level of smart city technology integration varies greatly by region. What is considered to be one of the leading smart cities in Brazil, for example, may be far behind some of the leading cities in Denmark. To illustrate this, let’s compare Curitiba, Brazil with Copenhagen, Denmark.

Apples to Oranges

Curitiba has one of the most advanced recycling programs in Brazil, yet the city recycles just 20% of its waste.  In Copenhagen, 57% of total waste was recycled in 2009. Additionally, incineration centers are converting waste to energy by using steam from the water that is heated in the incinerator ovens. Roughly 80% of this steam energy is being used in the municipal heating system, and 20% is being fed back into the electricity grid. While Curitiba deserves significant praise for pioneering a very successful bus rapid transit (BRT) system, the city is still struggling with congestion and has just recently made initial plans for subway system infrastructure. Conversely, Copenhagen Metro began operation in 2002 (22 stations, nine of which are underground), and a driverless light metro supplements the larger S-train rapid transit system. Back in Brazil, Curitiba has the highest rate of public transport use in Brazil (45% of journeys), while in Copenhagen, it is estimated that 50% of all citizens commute by bicycle every day.

Beyond specific projects, broader climate action goals between these two cities are also quite different. Copenhagen aims to become the first carbon-neutral city in the world by 2025. The city has established targets in energy efficiency, renewable energy, and green building standards (all new buildings must be carbon neutral by 2020). Navigant Research has been unable to identify any city-level sustainability or climate action plans in Curitiba.

GDP Considerations

This comparative analysis by no means intends to detract from the tremendous achievements and progress in sustainability that Curitiba has attained. Instead, it seeks to illustrate the regional nature and context of what constitutes a leading smart city. With a gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of roughly $60,000 in Copenhagen, a much larger volume of resources is available for smart city development than in Curitiba, where GDP per capita is estimated to be $13,000.

The global smart city technology market is forecast to be worth more than $27.5 billion annually by 2023, according to Navigant Research’s Smart Cities report. Cumulative global investment in smart city technologies over the decade is expected to be $174.4 billion.

Annual Smart City Technology Revenue by Region, World Markets: 2014-2023

Smart Cities Revenue

(Source: Navigant Research)

 

Several U.S. Parking Garages Become Certified Green Garages

— July 16, 2015

The Green Parking Council’s (GPC’s) Green Garage Certification is the only global rating system that defines and recognizes sustainable practices in parking structure management, programming, design, and technology.  This certification, which was launched in June 2014, assesses nearly 50 elements of parking facility sustainability, including operations that maximize performance while minimizing waste; programs encouraging alternative modes of transportation and community involvement; and efficient and sustainable technology and structure design.

The certification was initiated partly in response to the decision by the U.S. Green Building Council in 2012 that it would no longer certify parking structures under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. Going forward, the Green Garage Certification will be administered globally by Green Business Certification, Inc., which is the same certification body that oversees the U.S. Green Building Council’s global LEED green building rating system.

On July 1, 2015, the GPC announced the first seven parking facilities in the United States to achieve Green Garage Certification.

Garages with Green Garage Certifications: July 2015

Garages(Source: Green Parking Council)

While details haven’t been released on what each parking garage offers in particular, sustainable garages often integrate technologies and strategies such as energy-efficient lighting and ventilation systems, guidance systems that assist drivers in finding an available space more quickly, idle-reduction technologies, electric vehicle charging stations, tire inflation stations, fire suppression systems, carsharing programs, bicycle parking, and storm water management practices.

The GPC’s Green Garage Certification is an important development for the parking industry. LEED certification for buildings has gained tremendous popularity over the past few years, and the certification from the GPC could have the same result on the parking industry that LEED has had on buildings. According to the U.S. Green Building Council, over 16,000 LEED for New Construction and Major Renovation projects have been certified by the agency since 2000. These certification programs encourage businesses and government agencies to participate in energy efficiency by providing the organizations with clear goals and standards to work toward, in addition to sustainable marketing opportunities. For more information on advanced smart parking systems, see Navigant Research’s latest report, Smart Parking Systems, on the evolving market.

 

Japan’s METI Supporting Smart City Projects

— July 2, 2015

According to Navigant Research, a smart city is characterized by the integration of technology into a strategic approach to sustainability, citizen well-being, and economic development. While there may be various definitions of a smart city, in many cases, smart cities are desired in order to cope with the growing urban population, achieve sustainability goals, and maintain economic competitiveness through innovation and technology development. In addition, city resilience—the ability to recover from catastrophic events—has become increasingly important in the context of climate change.

In Japan, smart city projects are being led by the central government and local governments, as well as by the private sector. However, due to the centralized political model and events requiring national response, such as the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, large-scale smart city projects are usually initiated by the central government through the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). After the 2011 earthquake and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, Japan had a distinct motive to promote smart cities as means to reconstruct affected urban areas.

Subsidized Projects

There have been two waves of smart city projects subsidized by the METI under its Science, Technology and Innovation budget. The first wave of projects is the Test Projects for Next-Generation Energy and Social System. In 2010, METI solicited local governments for smart city project applications. In April 2010, four cities were selected—Yokohama, Toyota City, Keihanna, and Kitakyushu—to receive METI subsidies that amount to ¥126.5 million. Initially, the pilot cities focused on improving the quality of life and showcasing innovative technologies. However, after the 2011 earthquake, there was a paradigm shift to work toward reducing energy consumption and improving energy efficiency.

These four cities have become the first successful operational pilots in Japan. Some areas of success include demand response programs, which reduced consumption during peak period by 20% in Kitakyushu; home energy management (HEM) programs in which 1,500 homes in Yokohama had HEM systems installed in 2013; vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology; and smart metering. Details on these projects and updates can be found on the Japan Smart City Portal.

In 2012, METI pursued a second wave of subsidized smart city projects to reconstruct cities affected by the earthquake to become more resilient. In 2012, 10 cities were selected for the Projects for Promoting Introduction of Smart Communities program with a budget of ¥8.06 billion. Also, because of the widespread shutdown of the nation’s nuclear power plants post-Fukushima, Japan has been decidedly promoting renewable energy resources to meet its demand. In 2012, the country introduced a feed-in tariff system, as well. While the second wave of smart city projects is still in the planning stage, thanks to the earlier success in the four pilot cities, Japan is getting closer to realizing its aspiration to create the Japanese model of smart cities to export.

 

Bristol, U.K. Plans To Be Open, Programmable City

— May 20, 2015

The City of Bristol’s selection as the European Green Capital 2015 is an example of the increasingly visible role that U.K. cities are taking in the evolution of smart city ideas and solutions.  The title may be largely symbolic, but it is one that many European cities covet as a validation of their innovation in sustainable living and development.  As with all such awards, there is plenty of skepticism as to how far the realities match the rhetoric, but the scope and ambition of the city’s program are impressive. Bristol has been keen to build on the award and use it to add significant momentum to an already impressive list of projects cutting across the energy, transportation, building, and technology sectors.

A good example of Bristol’s ambition is the recently launched Bristol is Open, a joint venture between the city council and the University of Bristol to develop an open, high-speed network that will foster innovation across multiple city applications. The project has funding support from the U.K.’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport and Innovate UK, and is also building on the supercomputing capabilities of the University of Bristol.

Experimentation as a Service

A core element of the project is a City Operating System (CityOS), developed by the University’s High Performance Networks research group. The CItyOS will manage the machine-to-machine communications across the city using a software defined network (SDN)  approach to improve manageability, integration, and accessibility.  The network is being developed according to OpenDaylight standards as part of the project’s commitment to openness, which extends to procurement and data management, as well as hardware and software.  All the data generated will be anonymized and made public through the city’s open data portal. The project team will also proactively share its findings with other cities, technology companies, universities, and citizens. The network will be used by technology companies, research organizations and small and medium-sized enterprises to develop and experiment with new solutions in urban mobility, energy efficiency, environmental monitoring, and health. The team has defined its approach as City Experimentation as a Service.

The project will make use of three networks: a 30-GB  fiber optic network, a series of Wi-Fi wireless networks along the Brunel Mile area of the city, and a radio frequency mesh network based on city lampposts.  The aim is to eventually expand the networks beyond the city center into the wider city region, creating an open, programmable region covering one million people. Among the partners already signed up for the project is Silver Spring Networks, which is providing the  mesh network technology to connect the city’s streetlights and to provide a platform for other applications, such as traffic monitoring, air quality control, and safety cameras.

Creating the Digital City

The Bristol project is an example of how  the Internet of Things (IoT) and smart city concepts are coming out of the labs and small-scale pilots and onto the streets of major cities.  Other examples include an extended smart street lighting network in Copenhagen and Barcelona’s plan to develop a multi-application Urban Platform.

If successful, the Bristol model could be a showcase for how network infrastructure and a CityOS can provide a shared capability for access and innovation.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Electric Vehicles, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Smart Grid Practice, Smart Transportation Practice, Smart Transportation Program, Utility Innovations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Smart Cities","path":"\/tag\/smart-cities","date":"8\/31\/2015"}