Navigant Research Blog

Street Lights Add EV Charging

— December 11, 2014

Sometimes a solution forms at the intersection of two challenges that may not seem, at first glance, to have anything in common.  For example, cities are perpetually seeking ways to increase revenue, and many owners of electric vehicles (EVs) want access to ubiquitous charging infrastructure.

Enter the new concept of retrofitting street lights with money-saving LEDs and EV charging ports.  City managers are moving toward central control of street lights by adding a control node, which enables them to reduce cost and integrate the lights with other systems, as my colleague Jesse Foote recently wrote.  With smart street lighting technology (as covered in Navigant Research’s report, Smart Street Lighting) in place, EV charging capabilities can also be added to street lights, creating a new revenue stream for municipalities.

A Light and a Charge

Among the first pilots of this combination are occurring in the cities of Munich in Germany, Aix-en-Provence in France, and Brasov in Romania.  BMW has two such lights at its headquarters in Munich and will add a series of enhanced lights in the city next year.  A consortium called Telewatt, led by lighting manufacturer Citelum, is similarly installing LED street lights with EV charging in Aix-en-Provence.  In Romania, local company Flashnet has integrated its inteliLIGHT management platform with an EV charger.

Motorists can pay for the EV charging using a mobile phone app.  Cities that have regulations allowing them to provide EV charging services can gain revenue to help balance the books.  They can also balance the additional power demand of EVs within their overall power management system.  Placing a Level 1 or Level 2 charging outlet on a light pole reduces the installation cost of bringing power to the curb, which otherwise can be several times greater than the cost of the equipment.  Cities that install these systems will help drive demand for EVs, which has the added benefit of increasing urban air quality.

This is another example of the integration of seemingly disparate city services into a smart city.  As detailed by Navigant Research’s Smart Cities Research Service, the move toward integrating power, water, transportation, waste, and building management will yield considerable savings while improving the quality of urban life for city dwellers.

 

Using Applications to Empower Smart Cities

— December 9, 2014

In late November, the crowdsourced smartphone app Waze released a stunning visualization that showed the traffic flowing through New York City on a recent September day.  Resembling blood flow though a body, cars move through the arteries and veins of city streets and highways, slowed by both collisions and general congestion.  Waze collects data via smartphone owners that allow their location (and speed and direction) to be captured and aggregated, providing real-time information on traffic in a city.  When using Waze, drivers can be alerted to new incidents like accidents and police on the road, and the app can even suggest new routes for a faster ride.

Crowdsourcing apps like Waze, ridesharing apps like Ridejoy, and home control apps like Nest may also be a boon to some of the smart city initiatives being developed and planned worldwide.  Numerous cities in the world are adapting IT for their infrastructure and streamlining operations for their departments.  Navigant Research’s report Navigant Research Leaderboard Report: Smart City Suppliers identifies the promising companies that have demonstrated advanced approaches and penetration in this sector.  Most smart city initiatives begin with public transportation and traffic monitoring, as they are critical services for citizens, and promote commerce as well.

Short on Cash

There’s a basic challenge for cities that want to pursue programs like these, though: limited municipal funding.  In the first world, or in a few examples in the developing world, cities have signed multimillion-dollar contracts, paying large IT and equipment companies for equipment and consulting services for smart city initiatives.  These large price tags limit the adoption of (large) smart city programs in the developing world and in smaller cities and towns.  Crowdsource apps could provide a solution.

If the data from crowdsourced apps like Waze could be shared with municipal agencies, data limitations would virtually disappear.  Instead of paying millions for a full service solution, a city could hire a cadre of data analysts to examine the trends in traffic, identify collision hot spots, and use the aggregated data for long-term traffic planning, supplanting expensive traffic studies.  One example of an interesting use of this kind of data is New York University’s (NYU’s) visualization of taxi rides in New York City.

Taxi Confidential

Using data from the Taxi and Limousine Commission, NYU researchers created a rich queryable database where taxi demand is revealed visually, and the impact of major disruptive events like Hurricanes Sandy and Irene on taxi rides can be understood (namely, that few taxis ventured into the power-less regions of lower Manhattan).  MIT has, in turn, developed an interactive website using the taxi data to demonstrate the value of ridesharing.   The academic insight has yet to be used for city policy, but as the analysis improves, such applications will surely follow.

Certainly, there are obstacles with this approach.  The first is privacy.  Aggregated urban mobility data can be anonymized.  Yet, the idea of governments gaining access to individual citizens’ whereabouts, regardless of the source of the data, may make a fair number of people uncomfortable.  Open questions prevail: Could mobility data be used for forensic purposes?  Since Waze is owned by Google, what other information could be associated and shared?  These questions and many others will have to be addressed through real deployment.  As has been seen through companies like Uber, which is now causing taxi medallion prices to fall, disruptive technologies can shake up the status quo.  City governments have not traditionally been the locus of innovation, but the smartphone in your pocket may change that in the near future.

 

South Korea Draws an Ambitious Roadmap for Smart Grids and Smart Cities

— November 12, 2014

South Korea has ambitions to be a world leader in smart grid technology.  The smart grid test bed on Jeju Island has been the proving ground for the technologies, partnerships, and business models required to achieve this goal.  Led by Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO), South Korea’s national power company, the Jeju Island demonstration project involved a wide range of South Korean and international partners.  The project ran from December 2009 until May 2013, had a total budget of around $240 million, and included two substations, four distribution lines, and 6,000 households.  The sub-projects included power grid upgrades, demand response, electric vehicles (EVs), renewable power integration, and new energy market models.

In this regard, Jeju Island mirrors many other smart grid pilots around the world looking at the integration of multiple technologies and new business models, particularly island community smart grid projects such those in Hawaii and Bornholm.

From Islands to Cities

South Korea is different in that the government has now laid out plans to move beyond its initial demonstration project into a wider series of trials and eventually a national rollout of smart grid technologies.  The next phase will involve a series of eight smart grid/smart community projects, to be run between 2015 and 2017.  More impressively, KEPCO has laid out plans to extend these projects into a series of municipal-scale smart grids by 2020.  The final stage of this grand scheme will see smart grid technologies deployed across the whole country by 2030.

The total budget for the pilot projects is $876 million, around $400 million of which will come from central and local governments and the rest from the private sector.  KEPCO alone is investing $155 million.  The government expects the private sector to take the lead in further development from 2018 onward.  As well as smart meters, an EV charging infrastructure, and energy storage, KEPCO is piloting a smart grid station that will provide sophisticated energy management and grid integration for commercial buildings, beginning with up to 220 KEPCO buildings.  It sees these smart grid stations as building blocks for community energy management systems and city-scale energy management.

Big City Vision

These are ambitious plans, and some of the South Korean experts I spoke with at Korea Smart Grid Week were skeptical about the ability of the government, KEPCO, and other stakeholders to meet the proposed timescales.  However, even if those timescales prove challenging, the vision and the roadmap are impressive.  I don’t know of any other country that has laid out a plan of this magnitude that would see smart grid technologies deployed across all of its major cities by 2020.  Such an achievement really would mark South Korea out as a world leader in both smart grid and smart city infrastructure.

 

Cities Are Making the Energy Cloud a Reality

— October 12, 2014

The possibilities for procuring and distributing clean, low-cost electricity offer challenges to cities and utilities – but also opportunities to forge new relationships and lay the foundations for cities that are clean and efficient in their energy use.

I’ve written previously about the close relationship between smart cities and smart grids.  Early projects have largely been driven by utility programs for the piloting and demonstration of smart grid technologies and to gather intelligence on consumer and business responses to energy management programs.

The challenge is to integrate the lessons learned from these projects into broader smart city programs.  Cities have played a role in these pilots but have largely been supporters of utility-driven technology programs.  This is changing as cities develop more extensive energy management strategies of their own.  Boston, for example, is working closely with its local utilities (National Grid and NSTAR) to reduce its $50 million-plus energy costs and meet the goal set in 2007 to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 25% by 2020 and 80% by 2050.   The city is targeting energy consumption across residential and commercial properties.  Other initiatives include the introduction of an energy management system for Boston’s public buildings and the deployment of LED street lighting.

New Collaborations

Minneapolis is going further.  The city is using the renegotiation of its franchise relationship with its utilities (which governs their access and use of city resources such as roadways and buildings) to establish a new form of collaboration that it believes can be a model for the rest of the United States.  The proposed Clean Energy Partnership between Minneapolis and its electricity and gas suppliers, Xcel Energy and CenterPoint Energy, will create a new body focused on helping the city meets its climate action goals of reducing GHG emissions 15% by 2015 and 30% by 2025 based on a 2006 baseline.

The increasing focus of city leaders on energy efficiency, reduced GHG emissions, and the development of a more resilient infrastructure requires close partnership with utilities.   Cities like Boston and Minneapolis are pushing their utilities to help them meet their commitments, but the cities themselves are also taking a more active role.  The Greater London Authority (GLA), for example, has become the first local government authority in the United Kingdom to be licensed as a “junior” energy supplier.  This enables London to buy power from small generators and sell it to other public bodies at an attractive rate.   The city expects to be buying and selling power by early 2015, and it hopes to reduce energy costs for London while also boosting the local renewable energy industry.

A Vision Emerges

The emerging energy vision for smart cities integrates large- and small-scale energy initiatives: from improvements in national infrastructure through citywide increases in efficiency to expanded local energy generation.  Cities will thus become clusters of smart energy communities that can exploit the benefits of the new energy systems, such as distributed generation, dynamic load management, and active market participation.

This synergy presents an excellent example of the opportunities and challenges presented to utilities by the emergence of the energy cloud.  Utilities need to see cities as more than demonstration sites for technology.  Cities are ideal partners for developing the new relationships and the new services core to that energy cloud vision.

These issues are explored further in a new Navigant Research white paper, Smart Cities and the Energy Cloud.  I will also be discussing these developments in my presentation on Smart Cities at Korea Smart Grid Week in October and at European Utility Week in November.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Electric Vehicles, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Smart Grid Practice, Smart Transportation Practice, Smart Transportation Program, Utility Innovations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Smart Cities","path":"\/tag\/smart-cities","date":"12\/21\/2014"}