Navigant Research Blog

Outage Management Technology Looks to an Integrated Future

— December 30, 2014

First deployed in the 1970s, outage management systems (OMSs) were originally designed to incorporate outage notifications from external sources to create a map view of the outage and generate an optimized power restoration plan.  Today, with smart grids revolutionizing power delivery through telecommunications and automation, OMSs have evolved into something much more sophisticated.  However, it’s also become less and less clear what an OMS actually is.

Conventional OMSs understand the outage, determine the correct course of action to take, and issue switching orders for the control room operator and/or distribution management or supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system.  Though these systems can be linked, each one typically maintains a separate database, meaning that no system holds a complete understanding of the network state or restoration process.  Now, vendors are combining outage management with distribution management and SCADA, creating what is often called an advanced distribution management system (ADMS).  Incorporating a single system map and database, ADMSs can manage the engineering grid with the restoration process in real time, resulting in faster, more informed action to restore power.

Real-Time Resilience

On the communications side, new OMSs may integrate real-time, two-way information from the customer call center, the interactive voice response (IVR) system, smart meters, mobile crews, and even social media.  This enables the system to update itself immediately upon the reception of outside information and exchange pertinent notifications and updates with mobile crews and customers.  Again, OMSs have traditionally not managed these different communications media; they’ve only exchanged limited information with them.  Now, due to proliferating open standards, the pace of this exchange has increased, and new platforms, such as social media, are increasingly involved.

Analytics solutions represent another game-changer for OMSs and grid resiliency/reliability efforts.  Analytics technology combines notifications, voltage readings, and outside sources, such as weather, to inform preventive maintenance efforts, increase the accuracy of damage assessment, and improve the efficiency of the restoration plan.  Analytics systems can be integrated into a combined DMS/OMS/SCADA, ADMS, or purchased as a separate overlay to enhance systems.

All Together Now

Navigant Research expects growth for standalone OMSs to decline as more utilities adopt ADMS strategies, but market demand for improved reliability and lowering outage costs will continue to drive adoption of products and services to support advanced outage management — analytics, customer engagement tools, and distribution automation. As Navigant Research’s report, Outage Management Systems, makes clear, these systems certainly aren’t what they used to be.  Not only are they more dynamic, reliable, and flexible, but they’re also used by utilities in new ways that require traditionally siloed departments that manage engineering, operations, and communications to work closely together.

Not all utilities will adopt a full ADMS solution from a single vendor—it’s likely that many will configure systems in a more integrated fashion and will move toward a combined management philosophy, where outage management is one application within a platform that manages operations, engineering, and even customer engagement during events.


New Transmission Replaces Retiring Coal Plants

— December 23, 2014

In my drive across the country last summer, two unexpected features of the landscape stood out.  First, driving across Nevada and Utah, the silhouette of coal power plants frequently loomed on the horizon.  Second, the sweeping vistas almost anyplace across the western half of the United States now almost always include electric transmission towers and power lines. The recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP) will certainly change that landscape, as aging coal generation plants are retired and dismantled. Driving between Green River and Provo, Utah, I passed through a beautiful canyon and within a few hundred yards of the Price Canyon coal-fired plant, which is scheduled for retirement due to age, EPA compliance regulations, and a constrained location.

If the EPA plan is implemented as currently written, there will be an increase in transmission planning and spending as the transmission grid is reconfigured to address coal generation plant retirements and new transmission capacity is required to deliver wind and solar resources to utilities in other parts of the country.

Out of the West

In previous Navigant Research blogs, I have discussed the development of a north-south transmission highway between the northern Midwest wind farms and the population centers in Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas.  However, coal plant retirements across the lower Midwest, East Coast, and southeastern U.S. will have a serious impact on electric reliability across those regions, according to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Forward-thinking electric transmission companies are anticipating this and are now building new west-to-east transmission to deliver wind power from the High Plains to population centers in the Midwest and Southeast that will be hit hard by the retirements.

In November, the Rock Island Clean Line LLC filed petitions with the Iowa Utilities Board to obtain new electric transmission line franchises.  Rock Island plans to construct, maintain, and operate an electric transmission line across 16 Iowa counties.  The project is an approximately 500-mile overhead, high-voltage direct current (DC) transmission line that will deliver 3,500 MW of wind energy generation from northwest Iowa to cities in Illinois and other eastern states.

When you look at the distribution of existing coal-fired generation plans across the United States, it’s easy to imagine where additional new transmission lines will be needed. The map below shows the distribution of the coal generation fleet across the United States.

Coal Power Plant Locations and Size, United States: September 2014

(Source: Energy Velocity Maps)

Perhaps another transmission superhighway, using ultra-high-voltage alternating current and high-voltage DC transmission lines to move energy from the High Plains to the Midwest and Southeast, will take shape in the coming years.


Will Coal Plant Retirements and Fracking Threaten Electric Reliability?

— December 17, 2014

The implications of the rapid retirement of much of the U.S. coal generation fleet are just coming to light, and transmission operators and generation utilities are actively discussing and planning on contingencies that could cause a real threat to reliability and availability in many regions across the nation.  (The issues around retiring and decommissioning coal plants were discussed in Navigant Research’s research brief, Coal Plant Decommissioning.)  Compounding the threat of coal generation plant retirements is a short-term shortage of coal in many regions of the nation.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced its proposed Clean Power Plan (CPP) rule in June 2014.  It’s expected that the final rule will be announced in June 2015.  The CPP targets CO2 emissions by existing fossil-fueled electric generation and sets targeted reductions for each state.  The plan, as currently proposed, mandates 30% reductions in carbon emissions by 2030 from 2005 levels.

The proposed plan also gives each state flexibility to develop its own approach as to how it will meet the targets, including retiring problematic coal and other fossil fuel generation, adding renewables, such as wind or solar generation, or increasing levels of demand response and energy efficiency programs, which the recent EPA mandates may accelerate.

Time to Plan

Most people do not understand the issues that will arise in the Midwest and the southeastern United States as a result of coal generation plant retirements.  The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) discusses the implications at length in a recent paper on the impact of generation plant retirements based on the CPP.  NERC concludes the paper by suggesting that states immediately start operational and planning scenario studies, addressing resource adequacy, transmission adequacy, dynamic stability, and  economic and reliability impacts.  This must be done to demonstrate reliability and to ensure that plans of action are technically achievable within the stated time requirements.  “States that largely rely on fossil-fuel resources might need to make significant changes to their power systems to meet the EPA’s target for carbon reductions while maintaining system reliability,” the NERC authors conclude.

Supplies Down

In the near term, another related reliability threat is looming: the availability of coal to fuel the generation plants operating today.  Having formed a new trade group called the Western Coal Traffic League, Midwestern utilities are frustrated because their normal coal supplies from western U.S. coal producers have kept utilities from rebuilding stockpiles burned during last year’s cold winter. Compounding the effect, record harvests, economic growth, and growing oil shipments from the country’s booming oil fracking industry in in the upper Midwest are constraining the rail system.

The effective implementation of the CPP, along with tight supplies of coal, will make for an interesting winter in many parts of the United States.


CPower Reemerges as a Demand Response Player

— December 15, 2014

In October, I wrote about the announcement that Comverge and Constellation would combine their commercial and industrial demand response (DR) businesses into a standalone entity.  The questions were: What would the new company be called?  Would they take one of the existing names?  Combine the two names?  Come up with something new?  Instead, they brought back a familiar brand: CPower, the name of the DR provider that Constellation bought 4 years ago.

But this is not your mother’s CPower, according to Chris Cantone,  the company’s senior vice president of sales and marketing.  The C in CPower carries multiple meanings aside from the lingering brand recognition: the combination of Comverge and Constellation, customer engagement, and curtailment services.  “The market has been excited about the announcement, and our channel partners have been waiting for an independent DR provider,” Cantone told me in a phone interview.  The company is still in a little bit of stealth mode as the behind-the-scenes business combination unfurls, but expect a media splash in the near future.

Divide and Succeed

What value does this new structure bring to the parties involved? Cantone says that the future of DR will entail greater technical requirements, which were hard to fulfill under a larger organization like Constellation.  CPower can be more strategic and proactive on its own, while maintaining a preferred provider relationship with Constellation for its customers.  From Comverge’s perspective, there was a lack of synergy between its utility-focused residential business and its market-focused commercial and industrial business, so it made sense to split them up and allow them to build to their own strengths.

So was Constellation’s purchase of the original CPower 4 years ago a mistake?  No, asserts Cantone.  It was an invaluable experience for the old CPower DR experts to get immersed in the energy markets and learn how DR fits into the bigger picture on the wholesale side with generation and the retail side with customers’ energy procurement strategies.   Additionally, the 2011 deal was the move that set in motion the trend of larger energy entities investing in the DR realm, as Johnson Controls bought Energy Connect, Siemens bought Site Controls, Schneider bought Energy Pool (in Europe), and NRG bought Energy Curtailment Specialists.  Will those combinations survive?  Cantone thinks they will have to deal with the same issues that Constellation did, and we will have to see who can find internal solutions and who sets DR free.

The Real Threat

Regarding business strategy, the initial intent is to focus on the existing markets in the United States, like PJM, ERCOT, NYISO, ISO-NE, and California.  An expansion into utility programs could be the next growth step, followed by selective entry into the burgeoning international arena.

I contacted executives at EnerNOC to get their take on what looks to be their strongest competition, but they declined to comment .  In the meantime, EnerNOC and CPower may find common ground to combat the potential disruption from the court drama over FERC 745 to remove DR from the wholesale markets, which could affect them more than any amount of friendly competition could.


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