Navigant Research Blog

Bristol Claims Top Spot as UK Cities Step Up Innovation Programmes

— November 3, 2017

The UK Smart Cities Index 2017, commissioned by Huawei, provides a timely review of the progress of smart cities in the UK and offers insights for urban innovation projects around the world. Bristol gains the top spot in the new index, a reflection of the city’s continued investment in programmes such as Bristol Is Open and the growing integration between innovation projects with the city’s operations. The city exemplifies the way smart city concepts are gradually being embedded at the heart of city policy. While Bristol edges ahead of London this year, the UK capital is also showing a strong commitment to driving smart city innovation, notably with the recent appointment of a new Chief Digital Officer. Following the two Leaders is a strong group of Contenders led by Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Milton Keynes, Glasgow, and Nottingham.

Innovation Highlights

The scope of work being done across the UK is highlighted in the report in a series of Innovation Awards that showcase leadership in 10 areas. The first five awards focus on specific areas of city services:

Transportation: Many UK cities are looking at technologies to reduce congestion and transport-related emissions, and Milton Keynes stands out for its range of projects and its close alignment with the city’s broader strategy for growth. Its initiatives include mobility apps, EV and automated vehicles, and a new citywide intelligent traffic light management system.

Health: Supporting aging populations and reducing health inequalities, notably in terms of differences in life expectation between communities, are high priorities. Leeds is a leader among UK cities in exploring the possibilities of more integrated approaches to health and social care, the role of technologies in supporting people throughout their lives, and the importance of data in improving health outcomes.

Energy: As Navigant Research has highlighted, energy is an increasingly important issue for many cities in the UK and elsewhere. Not only is energy policy a key element in any broader sustainability target, it is also closely connected to transport, housing, and health policies. Among several cities driving new energy programmes, Nottingham gains the Innovation Award for its city-owned energy company, foundational energy projects, and new community energy schemes exploring the use of solar and storage solutions.

Education: One of the significant trends identified in the study is the closer relationship developing between local government and the university sector. Among the cities working in new ways with their universities to drive smart city projects are Bristol, Cambridge, and Oxford. But the Innovation Award goes to Newcastle for the role the University of Newcastle has taken in the establishment of Newcastle City Futures and in directing and supporting a range of digital programmes in the city—as well as the establishment of the Science Central facility.

Public Safety: As most UK cities have already deployed extensive closed-circuit TV systems, the focus is now on coordination and the better use of video analysis and other forms of analytics. Glasgow has led the way in the creation of a new city operations centre, the showcase development from its smart city demonstrator award.

Cities are exploring the potential for new technologies in each of these service areas, they also realise the need to join up these programmes through more holistic approaches and the development of common platforms. In my next blog, I will look at the cities leading the way in these areas.

 

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