Navigant Research Blog

The Future of Energy: Open or Closed?

— January 20, 2015

Among technology giants, two predominant business models dictate the way in which consumers connect (and interact) with the broader Internet and the way in which innovation unfolds: open and closed.  This tug-of-war between open versus closed has been going on ever since the Internet first started to hit the mainstream.  As described by GigaOM, “It’s a battle that has been at the heart of the technology industry for most of its modern history.”

Open models seek to facilitate universal access and maximize creativity, but potentially breed chaos, error, and design catered to the lowest common denominator.  Closed systems limit the number of participants and exert more control over the flow of information, but can make it easier to roll out dynamic products while minimizing the potential for error.  In more specific terms, it’s a battle between the Google, Android, and Adobe business models and those of Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft.  Each carries with it specific advantages and disadvantages.

Advent of the Cloud

Although still in its infancy, in the emerging Energy Cloud, the battleground is divided similarly, with advocates of open and closed models both beginning to stake claims.

The Energy Cloud – the end result of an evolutionary shift away from a financial and engineering model that relies on large centralized power plants owned by utilities to one that is more diverse, in terms of sources of generation and ownership of assets, and enables the integration of new, distributed energy resources in addition to traditional generation – provides a rich ecosystem for breeding innovation as energy becomes increasingly democratized.  As depicted in the graphic below, the hallmark of the Energy Cloud is a shift away from one-way power flows to bidirectional flows in which consumers become both consumers and producers of power:

The Energy Cloud

(Source: Navigant Research)

Lessons from the Revolution

There are many lessons from the Internet revolution that can be applied to the Energy Cloud.  Open and closed Energy Cloud models alike must balance the need for access, reliability, safety, and ultimately, innovation.

The question comes down to this: will the Energy Cloud take the form of a walled garden, as CompuServe and America Online attempted in the early days of the Internet and Facebook is doing today, or will it remain an open landscape?  Or, perhaps of more relevance to stakeholders, which model best serves the goal of fostering a thriving, ubiquitous Energy Cloud?

Likely, both open and closed models will play key roles, as the Energy Cloud will serve multiple objectives simultaneously.  According to an essay on the topic from PricewaterhouseCoopers, innovation is almost never an either/or choice.  As most companies have discovered, their innovation goals involve a complex mix of closed and open models that is uniquely tailored to their specific innovation objectives.

Customers and Providers

For the incumbent utility, for example, objectives remain focused on preserving market share and maintaining safety and reliability while also growing profitability.  For the consumer, access to inexpensive and reliable power around the clock and choice in how and by whom their energy is produced remain key objectives.  Some stakeholders will seek to maximize either one of these positions, while others will seek to bridge the two.

In either case, the emergence of the Energy Cloud will require a rethinking of standards, protocols, and relationships among stakeholders.  With a slew of innovative technologies gaining market share – solar PV, distributed storage, home energy management systems – the integration of these assets into an efficient and resilient system remains among the greatest challenges ahead for all Energy Cloud stakeholders, and will likely be where the greatest emphasis on innovation will occur.

 

India’s Faulty Grid Presents A Transmission Opportunity

— January 12, 2015

Many of us here in the United States have little appreciation for the tremendous size and opportunity for electric transmission and distribution system technologies in the Asia Pacific region.  To use Geoffrey Moore’s analogies regarding how technology markets develop, there are the 500-pound gorillas, two or three followers, and a number of other wannabes.

Taking that metaphor to the regional market level, the Asia Pacific market has two significant gorilla countries, India and China, some followers like Japan, Australia, and Indonesia, and then the other wannabe countries.  Electric transmission technology vendors have an opportunity-rich environment across the region, but the sheer scale of the opportunities and the sophisticated plans in India and China present the biggest gorillas.  To illustrate this point, I’ll focus on India, where the national transmission planning process is most transparent.

The 1.2 Billion

India currently has a population of 1,264,360,000 people, representing 17.5% of the world’s population, or 386 people per km2, of which only an estimated 30% have electricity.  The country’s landmass is approximately 3,287,263.00 km2, which is about half the size of the United States.  India currently has over 220 gigawatts (GW) of generation capacity, a number that is expected to grow to 425 GW in 2022, with the addition of up to 66,000 kilometers of transmission lines and 90 new substations.  Most of the current electric transmission system in India is in the 135 kilovolt (kV) to 450 kV range, and it has significant reliability issues due to weather, introduction of intermittent renewables, and aging infrastructure.

The fascinating point here is that Power Grid India, the national transmission system operator, is now building out a high-voltage transmission superhighway that will serve as the backbone for India’s rapidly expanding transmission and distribution grid.  This plan is exceptional because of the use of extra-high-voltage 800 kV high-voltage direct current (HVDC) and 765 kV high-voltage alternating current (HVAC) systems – on a scale seen nowhere on the globe except in China.  The following graphic shows the overall configuration.

Planned HVTSs under Implementation, India

(Source: Power Grid Corp.  of India Ltd.)

The Way Forward

Adding to the tremendous scale, India is specifying and using the latest technologies, including state-of-the-art flexible AC transmission system (FACTS) devices such as static VAR compensators (SVCs) and static synchronous compensator (STATCOMs) that are still controversial in some regions in North America, such as PJM, as well as synchrophasor and wide area situational awareness (SWASA) technologies and solutions to better manage the transmission grid in real-time.  These technologies and markets are discussed in a series of Navigant Research reports from 2014, including Flexible AC Transmission Systems and High Voltage Transmission Systems.

India recently deployed over 1,300 phasor measurement units (PMUs), giving the country one of the largest current PMU deployments in the world, showing leadership in advancing these new and powerful technologies.

For the big three electric transmission technology companies, ABB, GE/Alstom, and Siemens, as well as the other technology companies like Schneider, S&C, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, and other new entrants, the rapid expansion of India’s transmission system represents a tremendous revenue opportunity.  For the population of India, it represents electrification on a large scale a much more reliable and resilient power grid – and a path to a much higher standard of living.

 

Utilities Poised to Join Enterprise Cloud Migration

— January 8, 2015

According to a study released by Infosys in November, more than 80% of large organizations are either using or planning to use cloud-based, mission-critical applications over the next 2 years.  Here at Navigant Research, we believe that trend is now extending to electric power utilities, as described in our white paper, Smart Grid: Ten Trends to Watch for 2015 and Beyond, also released in November.

Infosys and Forrester Consulting surveyed more than 300 technology managers and business decision-makers from the United States, Australia, and Europe.  Key findings included:

  • 77% of respondents are either using or planning to use Internet as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), or software as a service (SaaS) for a wide range of business applications.
  • 66% of enterprises agree that they should prioritize developing a comprehensive cloud strategy for their IT infrastructure.
  • 70% of businesses want to work with a cloud implementation provider that offers a single point of accountability.
  • 66% of companies are either concerned or very concerned about the complexity involved in managing and governing a hybrid cloud environment.
  • 83% of the cloud adopters surveyed are struggling to consolidate their cloud services – from IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS and from public and private clouds.

The survey also found that agility – rather than cost savings – is now the dominant driver for cloud adoption.  The full report can be found here.

Smart Grid in the Cloud

In Navigant Research’s white paper, we observed that smart grid as a service (SGaaS) is now moving from hype cycle to real world product, driven by the growing complexity of smart grid applications, a dearth of qualified IT professionals at all but the largest utilities, and increasing understanding on the part of utility execs that they may benefit by sticking to their knitting (i.e., keeping the lights on).  Itron, General Electric, ABB, and AT&T have all moved decisively into the SGaaS space over the last 18 months.

From a vendor perspective, the SGaaS model is appealing because it generates recurring revenue, which can help smooth out the ups and downs of direct sales.  Navigant Research expects that the market for managed utility services will grow from $1.7 billion in 2014 to $11.7 billion in 2023.  (For additional analysis and detailed forecasts for the SGaaS market, see Navigant Research’s report, Smart Grid as a Service.)

Annual SGaaS Revenue by Category, World Markets: 2014-2023

(Source: Navigant Research)

 

New Transmission Replaces Retiring Coal Plants

— December 23, 2014

In my drive across the country last summer, two unexpected features of the landscape stood out.  First, driving across Nevada and Utah, the silhouette of coal power plants frequently loomed on the horizon.  Second, the sweeping vistas almost anyplace across the western half of the United States now almost always include electric transmission towers and power lines. The recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP) will certainly change that landscape, as aging coal generation plants are retired and dismantled. Driving between Green River and Provo, Utah, I passed through a beautiful canyon and within a few hundred yards of the Price Canyon coal-fired plant, which is scheduled for retirement due to age, EPA compliance regulations, and a constrained location.

If the EPA plan is implemented as currently written, there will be an increase in transmission planning and spending as the transmission grid is reconfigured to address coal generation plant retirements and new transmission capacity is required to deliver wind and solar resources to utilities in other parts of the country.

Out of the West

In previous Navigant Research blogs, I have discussed the development of a north-south transmission highway between the northern Midwest wind farms and the population centers in Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas.  However, coal plant retirements across the lower Midwest, East Coast, and southeastern U.S. will have a serious impact on electric reliability across those regions, according to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Forward-thinking electric transmission companies are anticipating this and are now building new west-to-east transmission to deliver wind power from the High Plains to population centers in the Midwest and Southeast that will be hit hard by the retirements.

In November, the Rock Island Clean Line LLC filed petitions with the Iowa Utilities Board to obtain new electric transmission line franchises.  Rock Island plans to construct, maintain, and operate an electric transmission line across 16 Iowa counties.  The project is an approximately 500-mile overhead, high-voltage direct current (DC) transmission line that will deliver 3,500 MW of wind energy generation from northwest Iowa to cities in Illinois and other eastern states.

When you look at the distribution of existing coal-fired generation plans across the United States, it’s easy to imagine where additional new transmission lines will be needed. The map below shows the distribution of the coal generation fleet across the United States.

Coal Power Plant Locations and Size, United States: September 2014

(Source: Energy Velocity Maps)

Perhaps another transmission superhighway, using ultra-high-voltage alternating current and high-voltage DC transmission lines to move energy from the High Plains to the Midwest and Southeast, will take shape in the coming years.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Electric Vehicles, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Smart Grid Practice, Smart Transportation Practice, Smart Transportation Program, Utility Innovations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Utility Innovations","path":"\/tag\/utility-innovations","date":"1\/26\/2015"}